Raspberry Pi
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Raspberry Pi
A complete ARM GNU/Linux computer for $25.
(also covering Arduino and BeagleBone)
Curated by F. Thunus
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How To Create A Handheld Linux Terminal (V2)

Full Write-Up: http://n-o-d-e.net/post/141489192021/...Overview Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZc5g...This guide will show you how to create a handheld Linux terminal, using a Raspberry Pi 2, a bunch of off the shelf parts and simple hand tools. This is the second iteration of the terminal and has lots of new features, including a bigger touchscreen, double the battery capacity, accessible ethernet, and audio/video out. There are also tweaks to how the keyboard works, as well as new multitasking stuff in the software.----------------Subscribe http://bit.ly/1p0diNAMore at http://N-O-D-E.netFollow http://twitter.com/N_O_D_E_Merch/Support: http://N-O-D-E.net/shop/
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Best Arduino Robot Kit for Students

You can buy robot kit from below links:1. Makeblock Starter Robot Kithttp://amzn.to/1RcRpWn2. ArcBotics Hexy DIY Robot Kithttp://amzn.to/1RfQ8MV3.SunFounder Crawling Robot Kithttp://amzn.to/1U47dgq4.Sparki Arduino DIY Robothttp://amzn.to/1RcS2205.Crenova Robot Car Kithttp://amzn.to/1SeRqrN6.Robotics Shield Kithttp://amzn.to/1XJptcQFor More Details Visit:http://bit.ly/1SeRwQ9Please like and subsribe.I hope you can buy best robot kit from our information.Now, Go ahead and make your own robot.
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Arduino - Learning Kit

This video gives a run through of the learning kit that I use in this set of videos.The contents of this kit can be seen below:Arduino Uno board – or equivalentUSB cable to suit the Arduino boardMini BreadboardJumper cables – Mixture of: PLG to PLG, PLG to SKT, and SKT to SKTHC-SR04 Ultrasonic Range SensorInfrared Proximity SensorJY-MCU Bluetooth module (not mentioned in video)DC Motors x 2 - small 6 – 12 voltsServo Motor – Micro servo or any servo 4.8 – 6 voltsStepper Motor – small to medium 5 – 12 voltsL298N Dual Motor Controller ModuleAA Battery Holders – 6V, 9V, 12VSmall Components as follows:Transistors – 2N2222, 2N3904, 2N3906Diodes – 1N4001LEDs – Red, Green, YellowPush Button Switches – PCB Mount SPST 12VLDR – Light Dependent ResistorTMP36 – Analog Temperature SensorPiezo Buzzer – PCB mountablePotentiometer x 2 – Breadboard Trim Pot 10K ohmFlex SensorRelay - 5V DC SPDTResistors – 1.5, 4.7, 10, 47, 100, 220(lots), 330(lots), 470(lots), 680, 1k(lots), 2.2k, 3.3k, 4.7k, 10k, 22k, 33k, 47k, 100k, 330k, 1MCapacitors – Ceramic 10pf, 22pf, 100pf, 1nf, 10nf, 100nf, Electrolytic decoupling 25V - 1uf, 10uf, 100uf, 1000ufAlso mentioned in the video – Prototyping Shield and Data Logging Shield with RTC and SD Card slot
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K12 Ultra Slim 2.4GHz Portable Mini Wireless Keyboard with Large Size Touchpad Mouse High Quality

for best pricehttp://bit.ly/25kP7dJK12 Ultra Slim 2.4GHz Portable Mini Wireless Keyboard with Large Size Touchpad Mouse High Quality Stainless Steel Back Cover and Rechargable Li-ion Battery for PC,Laptop,Raspberry PI 2, MacOS,Linux, HTPC, IPTV, Google Android Smart TV Box ,XBMC,Windows 2000 XP Vista 7 8 10(k12)Features:Most Ultra-slim with stainless steelPortable and fashionableBuilt-in rechargeable lithium-ion battery, using USB cable for charging, environment friendlyTouchpad with multi-finger functionsA single finger click as left mouse function, two-finger click as the right mouse functionAuto sleep for saving battery, clicking on any key to activate. USB receiver is inserted back in the keyboard for convenience and protection Operations:Insert the USB receiver adapter from back cover of the keyboard into an available USB port.Turn on the keyboard and can be found automatically, then it is ready to put into use.Specification :-Receiver (dongle): Nano style-Connect port: with USB 2.0 above-RF mode: 2.4GHz GFSK-Transmission distance: up to 10 meters-Transmission power: less than +4db-Power supply: rechargeable 280mAh polymer lithium-ion battery-Charging voltage: 4.4 V-5.25V-Charging current: 300mA-Sleeping current: 19uA-Operation voltage: 3.3V-Weight: 320g-Size: 260*85*12mm
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arduino spectrum analyser and light organ

Arduino project: spectrum analyser and light organ, with microphoneusing FHT and octave frequency bandssee details at http://cassiopeia.hk/category/projects/sound clip: daft punk
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Primer proyecto Arduino Starter Kit (1 led en serie con dos botones) Arduino Starter kit project 1

#Electronica #Electronics #StarterKit #Ciencia #Science #Unboxing #Fritzing#Arduino #ArduinoUno #Starterkit #HaveFun #Science #Ciencia #Electronics #Electronica #Sensor #Actuator #Actuador #Circuit #Circuito #Transducers #Transductor #Current #Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCod-... #Instagram #Facebook #Twitter @elect_ciencia #Wordpress #Gmail electronica.ciencia@gmail.com
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RASPBERRY-PI USING CAYENNE

MONITOR TEMP AND SEND ALARM MESSAGE AND TURN ON ALARM LIGHT. This example would be if a freezer went above a temp say above freezing and light an alarm lamp and send email or text message.
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Raspberry Pi 3: Could a $35 Raspberry Pi replace your PC?

Raspberry Pi 3: When the Raspberry Pi appeared In 2012 few could have envisaged how popular it would be. In the years after its release the Raspberry Pi has become the most popular single-board computer on the market and spawned many imitators, but none with the rich community that has grown organically around the Raspberry Pi. For $35 could this be your next PC?
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Make a Mind-Controlled Arduino Robot, 1Ed

Make a Mind-Controlled Arduino Robot, 1Ed | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
DIY Make a Mind-Controlled Arduino Robot - Build a robot that responds to electrical activity in your brain — it’s easy and fun. If you’re familiar with Arduino and have basic mechanical building skills, this book will show you how to construct a robot that plays sounds, blinks lights and reacts to signals from an affordable electroencephalography (EEG) headband. Concentrate and the robot will move. Focus more and it will go faster. Let your mind wander and the robot will slow down. You’ll find complete instructions for building a simple robot chassis with servos, wheels, sensors, LEDs and a speaker. You also get the code to program the Arduino microcontroller to receive wireless signals from the EEG. Your robot will astound anyone who wears the EEG headband. This book will help you: Connect an inexpensive EEG device to Arduino Build a robot platform on wheels Calculate a percentage value from a potentiometer reading Mix colors with an RGB LED Play tones with a piezo speaker Write a program that makes the robot avoid boundaries Create simple movement routines
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BBC begins rolling out micro:bit computers to UK school kids

BBC begins rolling out micro:bit computers to UK school kids | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The BBC has begun delivering up to a million of its micro:bit mini computers to school children in the UK for free. Announced last year as part of the organization's Make it Digital initiative, the micro:bit is a pocket-sized programmable device aimed at encouraging young people to code. The micro:bit is similar to other micro computers like the Rasberry Pi or Arduino. It is based on ARM mbed hardware and features an LED display, buttons, a motion detector, a compass and sensors. It can also be connected to other devices, sensors and everyday objects. Users can program the micro:bit using online code editors or an accompanying smartphone app. There are also resources and tutorials available online to help teachers, parents and students learn about the device. The BBC suggests the device could be used to make simple games, smartwatches or fitness trackers, but more ambitious pre-launch projects have included sending one into space, using 1,009 prototypes to build a screen and creating racing cars. "The BBC micro:bit has seemingly limitless potential, especially when paired with other hardware, and we can't wait to see what students will do with it," says head of BBC Learning Sinead Rocks. "They've already come up with all kinds of ideas during testing and at events around the country – some ideas help solve some of life's daily challenges, some could have business potential, and others are just great fun." The BBC says the micro:bit is its most ambitious education project since the 1980s, when its BBC Micro computer helped to introduce UK schoolchildren to computing. The scheme was made possible through partnerships between the BBC and 31 other organizations, including ARM, Barclays, element14, Lancaster University, Microsoft, Nordic Semiconductor, NXP Semiconductors, Samsung, Technology Will Save Us and the Wellcome Trust. The BBC is planning distribute its micro:bit computers to schools across the UK and to home-schooled students over the next few weeks. It will also be possible to buy the micro:bit from a number of retailers. After the roll-out, the micro:bit hardware and much of its software is expected to be open-sourced. The video below provides an introduction to the BBC micro:bit. Source: BBC
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Adding a Database to the Raspberry Pi Zero

Adding a Database to the Raspberry Pi Zero | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
This morning, after someone added SQL Developer to a Raspberry Pi 3, Jeff Smith pinged me and the question was posed, as it often is, can you run Oracle database server on a Raspberry Pi, (RPI)? The answer is no, you can’t, as there are no binaries for the ARM processor platform that you can compile, so its nothing to do with power, (although it is low powered for a very good reason…) but really due to the processor type.  Hopefully that’ll stop those of you building out massive RPI clusters in hopes of creating their own home servers with these inexpensive computers. With this said, you can run a database, so to show how easy this is, I’ll show you how to install and work with an installation of SQLite on a Raspberry Pi Zero, the version that’s less than 1/2 the size of a credit card. Other people have a beer and take the evening off.  Me?  I have a beer and start installing stuff on single board computers… Install SQLite Installation is easy.  Ensure you have the latest update, so if you haven’t run your update in awhile, run that first from the command line.  Remember you must have root or sudo privileges to perform these tasks: $sudo apt-get update Once complete and you know you’re up to date, then simply get and install SQLite: $sudo apt-get install sqlite3 Create a Database Let’s create a database: $sqlite3 mydb.db This creates the database using the mydb.db file as the logical container for it. Note: If you need help at any time, you can type in .help or .show from the sqlite prompt and it will display information similar to man pages in linux.  It’s very helpful and user friendly. If you’re out there comparing features, about to complain about all the ways that SQLite is NOT Oracle, well, you can stop right here.  On the support page for SQLite is the quote: Small. Fast. Reliable.  Choose Any Three. SQLite isn’t trying to be Oracle, but if you need a database and you’d like to put one on a RPI, this is the one to use that is small, fast and reliable. Working with SQLite Of course there are some syntax differences and SQLite has most standard SQL syntax at it’s disposal. Remembering to type BEGIN for the implicit transactions and to COMMIT after each is commonly the biggest challenge.  This includes for data dictionary objects, (aka ddl). As this isn’t a full RDBMS client/server database, there aren’t any roles or privileges that reside outside of the OS level privileges to the database file.  This database works very well in the support of RPI projects and this is the goal of what I’m hoping to demonstrate here. So let’s start by just creating a table and adding a few rows. begin; create table tbl1(col1_id text, date_c1 date, time_c1 time, range_1 numeric); commit; Now you can insert rows into your new table: begin: insert into tbl1 values('user1', date('now'), time('now'), 12); insert into tbl1 values('user2', date('now'), time('now'), 7); insert into tbl1 values('user3', date('now'), time('now'), 20); commit; You can then select from your new table and the row(s) will be returned, separated by the pipe symbol: select * from tbl1 where col1_id='user2'; user2|2016-03-22|00:12:237   So there you have it.  Database software installed-  check.  Database created- check.  Object created and rows added- check.  Table queried- check.  All done in less than five minutes. If you’d like to learn more, you can check out SQLite’s home page.
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WeKast is a HDMI & VGA Wireless Display Dongle for Business Presentations (Crowdfunding)

WeKast is a HDMI & VGA Wireless Display Dongle for Business Presentations (Crowdfunding) | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
You have already many options to mirror your mobile device’s screen to a big TV or projector with Chromecast, Miracast adapters, or EZCast dongles. However, if you want to connect it to a projector with a VGA connect you’ll need a separate HDMI to VGA adapter, and some devices may require Internet access, which you may or may not have during your presentations. WeKast dongle have been designed to simplify the process of setting up your presentation on any premises with HDMI and VGA output, and no requirement for WiFi connectivity. Simply copy your presentation on your smartphone, connect the dongle, and you’re ready to get started using WeKast app on your Android or iOS smartphone. WeKast hardware specifications: CPU – 1.6GHz processor System Memory – 1GB RAM Connectivity – 802.11 b/f/n with WPA2 enterprise security Video Output – Female HDMI and female VGA ports USB – 1x micro USB port for charging Battery – 1,200 mAh good for a 3-hour presentation. The app and dongle currently  supports ppt and pptx file, but other file formats such as pdf, doc, xls are also being worked on. Audio and video embedded in the presentation will work, and animations too, although with some limitations for the latter. A full mirroring option is also planned. You can watch the video to show how it works, and what problem WeKast aims to solve. The company wants to raise $50,000 via a Kickstarter campaign to fund production. The product costs is quite higher than competing wireless display solutions, with the pledges for WeKast starting at $89 (early bird), while the retail price should be $149. Shipping adds $10 to $15, and delivery is scheduled for January 2017. Beside the crowdfunding campaign, you can also visit WeKast website for details.
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[Arduino Tutorials] LED Blink PIN2,3,4,5,6 @acma

//Title: Lab1-7//Arthor: acma//Version: 1.0 23-03-2016//Description: Blink LED on pin 2,3,4,5,6https://codebender.cc/sketch:270477
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Beginner Guide to Programming Arduino Uno - Blink! #01

The first part of my series of arduino uno programming. I will be explaining how to write the blink program and fundamental of arduino ide programming constructionThe blink programm gives fundamental understanding of arduino functions and is recommended to understand it fully.I hope you enjoy the video and remember to subscribe !
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CNC machined Raspberry Pi/7" Display Enclosure

Machining a custom enclosure for a Pi and an Adafruit 7" HDMI display. This is my first project using Fusion360 for CAD/CAM work, and I'm really happy with the results. I machined the two halves of the enclosure out of 3/4" thick HDPE sheet. I wasn't particularly aggressive with the machining parameters since this was a first test of the toolchain, but I'm sold on adaptive clearing so far!This is a project I did for my hackerspace (www.makeitlabs.com), as part of our RFID access control system.
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Primer proyecto Arduino Starter Kit (1 led en serie con dos botones) Arduino Starter kit project 1

#Electronica #Electronics #StarterKit #Ciencia #Science #Unboxing #Fritzing#Arduino #ArduinoUno #Starterkit #HaveFun #Science #Ciencia #Electronics #Electronica #Sensor #Actuator #Actuador #Circuit #Circuito #Transducers #Transductor #Current #Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCod-... #Instagram #Facebook #Twitter @elect_ciencia #Wordpress #Gmail electronica.ciencia@gmail.com
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Stockfish vs Fruit on Raspberry Pi 2

Stockfish vs Fruit on Raspberry Pi 2, using ssh with X forwarding to display it on my iMac
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5 Fun, Easy Projects You Can Try With a $35 Raspberry Pi

Anyone can afford a $35 Raspberry Pi, but what do you do with this blank slate of computing to get started? We have 5 easy, useful ideas that anyone can pull off.SUBSCRIBE FOR THE LATEST VIDEOShttp://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...VISIT DIGITAL TRENDS http://www.digitaltrends.com/CHECK OUT OUR LATEST PODCASThttp://www.digitaltrends.com/podcasts/https://www.facebook.com/digitaltrend...https://twitter.com/digitaltrendshttps://plus.google.com/+digitaltrend...
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Arcade Bar Top Flat Pack Assembly (Mame / Raspberry Pi)

Assembly video for Arcade Bar Top Flat Pack Kit from Arcadeflatpack.co.uk. To purchase see Arcade_Flat_Pack on Ebay.
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DIY MintDuino - Building an Arduino-Compatible Breadboard Microcontroller

DIY MintDuino - Building an Arduino-Compatible Breadboard Microcontroller | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Build your own MintDuino microcontroller on a breadboard and master your next MintDuino project.
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Make a Raspberry Pi-Controlled Robot

Make a Raspberry Pi-Controlled Robot | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Master the basics of robotics with your RaspberryPi - learn to build a capable personal robot (then text it your commands!)
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TWC9: SQL on Linux, Microsoft Joins Eclipse Foundation, UWP Porting Guides for Android/iOS, Dogs and Cats living together and more... (Channel 9)

TWC9: SQL on Linux, Microsoft Joins Eclipse Foundation, UWP Porting Guides for Android/iOS, Dogs and Cats living together and more... (Channel 9) | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
This week on Channel 9, guest hosts Robert Green and Scott Klein discuss the week's (cough... month's) top developer news, including; [01:18] Microsoft to acquire Xamarin and empower more developers to build apps on any device [Scott Guthrie] [02:33] Announcing Microsoft HoloLens Development Edition open for pre-order, shipping March 30 [03:57] Microsoft joins the Eclipse Foundation and brings more tools to the community [Shanku Niyogi] [05:48] A Letter from Chris Charla: ID@Xbox Updates and GDC [Chris Charla] [07:12] R Tools for Visual Studio released as public preview [Athima Chansanchai] [08:37] UWP porting guidance for Android and iOS developers [10:39] Windows App Studio February 2016 update – agenda layout, searching in apps, and other new features [12:36] Raspberry Pi 3 on sale now at $35 [14:31] Introducing first ever experiences for the Microsoft HoloLens Development Edition [15:36] The Importance of the LED Moment - I DID THAT [Scott Hanselman] [17:05] Building Visual Studio Code on a Raspberry Pi 3 [Scott Hanselman] [18:15] Project AIX: Using Minecraft to build more intelligent technology [20:10] Participate in Pegasus II: Real-time Internet of Things experiment from the edge of space [Matt Long], The Pegasus Mission, Pegasus II Mission on Twitter, Pegasus II flight notifications  [20:54] Porting MSBuild to .NET Core [Daniel Plaisted] [22:02] Roslyn Succinctly, my new eBook [Alessandro Del Sole] [23:48] Leveraging Native UI in Apache Cordova Apps Using Project Ace [Wael Kdouh] Picks of the Week! Robert's Pick of the Week:[24:41] React Native Tools Scott's Pick of the Week:[25:24] Announcing SQL Server on Linux [Scott Guthrie] Please leave a comment or email us at twc9@microsoft.com.
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Micro:bit Computer - A Valuable Tool For Future Bitcoin Developers - Bitcoinist.net

Micro:bit Computer - A Valuable Tool For Future Bitcoin Developers - Bitcoinist.net | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Micro:bit Computer – A Valuable Tool For Future Bitcoin Developers After several delays, the BBC has started sending out free Micro:bit computers to students all over the United Kingdom. A total of one million of these tiny devices will be making their way to various schools, in the hopes of getting teachers and students more excited about the IT sector in general. Such a hands-on experience at a young age could benefit future Bitcoin development as well, even though these boards are just a stepping stone to potentially achieve greatness. Also read: Blockchain Technology in Europe: Theory and Practice Learning To Code With The BBC Micro:bit Getting children excited about the concept of creating their own applications and becoming the future software developers of our nation will be a major struggle. Unfortunately, there seems to be a stigma about coding and developing software, as most people see this as a “job for nerds”. However, most of the tools and services we use on a daily basis rely on people coding the software solutions to make this possible. Moreover, there seems to be a significant discrepancy between the number of men and women in the coding industry, as this is a male-dominated industry for several years now. However, with the deployment of the BBC Micro:bit, things might change for the good in the coming years, as these free computers are designed to get people more excited about creating new software solutions, and learning how things work. Although it remains to be seen whether or not the Micro:bit computer by the BBC will become a success, the concept is quite unusual. Getting the device into the hands of one million students across the United Kingdom is a smart move, and there is a manual included in the package contents as well for both users and teachers to explore what this tiny computer can do. Once the device has been put into the hands of these students, there are plans to commercialize the BBC Micro:bit and sell it to consumers in other regions as well. However, those plans will probably not come to fruition before the end of the year, and no price range has been announced just yet. It is worth nothing the BBC Micro:bit computer came to be thanks to a collaborative effort by various players in the technology industry. Microsoft, Samsung, NXP, Nordic Semiconductor, and Lancaster University all worked together to create a device that will hopefully create future generations of coders and IT enthusiasts. Moreover, a total of 20 different companies is supporting this project, either on the hardware or software side. Not A Bitcoin Node Device By Any Means Although the Micro:bit slightly resembles the Raspberry Pi design, this mini computer is far less powerful, and not designed to run heavy-duty software such as a Bitcoin node. However, this device can be used to explore the boundaries of programming with blockchain technology, and potentially coming up with new use cases for the Internet of Things. The world needs more coders in general, and there is no denying blockchain technology will play a significant role in the systems and tools we will be using in the future. Distributing Micro:bit computers to students in the United Kingdom is a smart move by the BBC, and the Bitcoin ecosystem can only benefit from these efforts in the long run. What are your thoughts on the distribution of the BBC Micro:bit computer? Will it make a significant impact on students to get excited about coding? Let us know in the comments below! Source: Ars Technica Images courtesy of Micro:bit, Shutterstock BBC, bitcoin, Coding, developer, IT, Micro:bit, Raspberry Pi
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