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7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK
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Données médicales. Une mine d'or convoitée

Données médicales.  Une mine d'or convoitée | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Prescriptions, efficacité des médicaments, causes de décès, honoraires ou remboursements : la France dispose d'une des plus grandes, « voire de la plus grande base médico-administrative du monde », selon un rapport de 2013. Le gouvernement promet de davantage partager ces données : une manne précieuse pour les industriels.

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Avec l’#opendata, la santé connectée franchit un nouveau pas | E-media, the Econocom blog

Avec l’#opendata, la santé connectée franchit un nouveau pas | E-media, the Econocom blog | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

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Stanford launches its HealthKit- and Epic-connected MyHealth app

Stanford launches its HealthKit- and Epic-connected MyHealth app | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Many large hospitals in the U.S. are evaluating or developing pilot projects around Apple’s HealthKit platform. Stanford Health Care is among the first to actually offer a working app that exchanges data between the Epic patient record system and Apple’s platform.

SHC quietly announced Tuesday the release of its new iOS 8 MyHealth mobile app for patients (no Android app yet).

The app was developed in-house by Stanford Health Care (SHC) engineers, and connects directly with Epic’s electronic health records system, and with Apple’s HealthKit to collect data from consumer health data monitoring devices like Fitbit wearables, for example.

SHC says patients can use the app to view test results and medical bills, manage prescriptions, schedule appointments, and conducti video visits with Stanford physicians.

The app supports Stanford Health Care’s new ClickWell Care, a telemedicine service that connects patients with Stanford doctors online. ClickWell also provides patients with a customized wellness coaching program from a certified personal trainer, who monitors data from the patient’s home health devices.

“We provide care for some of the most technologically sophisticated patients in the country, whose lives revolve around innovation,” said Stanford Health Care CEO Amir Dan Rubin in a statement. “After carefully evaluating all of the available mobile technologies, we recognized that to meet the needs and expectations of our patients we had to develop our own solution that worked seamlessly with our existing electronic health record system,” Rubin added.

The MyHealth app also creates offers a secure messaging platform where patients can communicate directly with caregivers. Using HealthKit, the MyHealth app syncs automatically with whatever consumer wellness devices or clinical home care devices the patient might use. The data received from the devices is automatically added to the patient’s chart in Epic for their physician to review remotely.

“By integrating with companies like Withings, our physicians have access to meaningful patient data right in Epic, without having to ask the patient to come in for an appointment,” said SHC CIO Pravene Nath, MD, in a statement. “We believe this is the future of how care will be delivered for many types of chronic conditions.”

Stanford Health Care consists of a large university hospital, primary care offices throughout the Bay Area, and outpatient clinics in Redwood City and Palo Alto, California.


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How Pfizer Is Using Big Data To Power Patient Care

How Pfizer Is Using Big Data To Power Patient Care | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Not so long ago, nearly every encounter with a doctor started with a receptionist waving a clipboard and asking me to take a seat. When I got into my doctor’s office, we‘d discuss the results from the blood test I’d taken the week before, my history and what I remembered [...]

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"My Ruby card" : le carnet de santé numérique

"My Ruby card" : le carnet de santé numérique | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Info forme & santé : carnet santé, hospitalisation, - En cas d'urgence médicale, nous n'avons pas toujours à portée de main notre fameux Carnet de santé. Et si celui-ci était contenu sur une carte, comme une clé USB ?

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Les données de santé attirent les hackers

Les données de santé attirent les hackers | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Quelques semaines après le piratage informatique de l'un des plus gros assureurs des États-Unis, les spécialistes de cybersécurité prédisent une année 2015 particulièrement sensible.

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INSTRUCTION INTERMINISTÉRIELLE RELATIVE À LA PROTECTION DES SYSTÈMES D'INFORMATION SENSIBLES - ANSSI


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OpenClinica : l'open source de la recherche clinique

OpenClinica : l'open source de la recherche clinique | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

OpenClinica est une plateforme informatique gratuite pour la mise en place de la recherche clinique : Base de donnée sécurisée, construction des masques de saisie des informations, randomisation, allocation, suivie des patients, saisie sécurisée, ...


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Intelligent use and clinical benefits of electronic health records in rheumatoid arthritis, Expert Review of Clinical Immunology, Informa Healthcare

Intelligent use and clinical benefits of electronic health records in rheumatoid arthritis, Expert Review of Clinical Immunology, Informa Healthcare | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Intelligent use and clinical benefits of electronic health records in rheumatoid arthritis: Expert Review of C... http://t.co/FWrqCV7khJ

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Healthcare Mobile Apps, the Cloud, and HIPAA Compliance

Healthcare Mobile Apps, the Cloud, and HIPAA Compliance | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Healthcare Mobile Apps, the Cloud, and HIPAA Compliance
Author: Cristy Salinas   Posted: October 14th, 2014 ˑ Filled under: Cloud, Healthcare, Mobile ˑ  0 Comments

Healthcare Mobile Apps, the Cloud, and HIPAA Compliance | Eureka Software

This post provides general information about HIPAA compliance for software and hardware development. Although Eureka Software has experience in this field, please consult your legal/compliance team for specific information on how to meet HIPAA compliance requirements.

Google Fit, Apple Health Kit, and even the Affordable Care Act have companies scrambling to build healthcare-focused mobile apps and/or upgrade existing medical devices. However, the process of bringing a new product to market in the healthcare industry brings about a whole other set of challenges. Not only do you have to worry about a product’s design and functionality, but now there’s the issue of HIPAA compliance and whether your product meets the criteria for FDA regulation. If you’re interested in building a healthcare-focused mobile app or medical device, don’t let these things deter you from doing so. Instead, let’s go over a few things you’ll need to be aware of before you jump in with both feet.
What is HIPAA?

The Health Insurance Portability and Privacy Act, also known as HIPAA, was first signed into law in 1996. HIPAA was written with the intent to protect individuals from having their healthcare data used or disclosed to people or agencies that have no reason to see it. It has two basic goals:

1.) Standardize the electronic exchange of data between health care organizations, providers, and clearinghouses.
2.) Protect the security and confidentiality of protective health information.

There are four rules of HIPPA, but today we’ll focus on the HIPAA Security Rule.
What is PHI?

Protected Health Information (PHI) includes medical records, billing information, phone records, email communication with medical professionals, and anything else related to the diagnosis and treatment of an individual. Examples of non-PHI include steps on your pedometer, calories burned, or medical data without personally identifiable user information (PII).

When building a healthcare app or medical device with the intent to collect, store, and share PHI with doctors and hospitals, it is absolutely mandatory make sure you’re HIPAA-compliant (or else you’ll face some hefty fines). Additionally, if you’re planning on storing data in the cloud, you must take appropriate measures to ensure you’re properly securing the data and working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service, too.

Here are some steps you’ll need to take:
Determine if your mobile app or medical device must be HIPAA-compliant.

Are you collecting, sharing, or storing personally identifiable health data with anyone who provides treatment, payment and operations in healthcare (aka a covered entity)? If yes, then you must be HIPAA-compliant.
Determine if your mobile app or medical device must FDA-regulated.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates medical devices to ensure their safety and effectiveness. If you plan to market your product as a medical device, then it may be subject to the provisions of the Federal Food Drug & Cosmetic (FD&C) Act. Find out if your product meets the definition of a medical device as defined by section 201(h) (or a radiation-emitting product as defined in Section 531) on the FDA website. (Visit Is This Product a Medical Device? for more information.) You can also contact the FDA directly if you are unsure whether your mobile app is considered a “Mobile Medical App” and will need to be FDA-regulated. (See Mobile Medical Applications.)
Work with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider.

Storing data in the cloud is appealing to the healthcare industry because of the amount of data that needs to be stored and easily accessible yet remain secure. The cloud allows individuals and businesses to store large amounts of information in massive data centers around the globe, rather than on internal servers and software. That data can be accessed from anywhere, anytime. Depending on the amount of data (which in healthcare can be A LOT), it can be more cost-effective to store data in the cloud when you account for the costs of hardware, maintenance, staff, and energy when storing locally.

That being said, you need to make sure you’re working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider, like Amazon Web Services or Google Apps, though there are several others you can consider.
Get a signed Business Associate Agreement.

Just because you’re working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider doesn’t mean you’re covered. Any vendor or subcontractor who has access to PHI is considered a Business Associate, and therefore must sign a Business Associate Agreement. That includes your cloud storage service provider.
Secure sensitive data.

Developers should take appropriate safeguards to ensure that PHI is secure and cannot be accessed by unauthorized individuals. People lose their smartphones and iPads or don’t enable passcodes at all, so it’s even more important to make sure the app or medical device is HIPAA-compliant. Things like data encryption, unique user authentication, strong passwords, and mobile wipe options are just a few requirements. See InformationWeek’s article about developers and HIPAA compliance for additional information.

Finally, there is no official certification process to ensure that you’re in compliance with HIPAA’s Security Rule. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website states:

    “The purpose of the Security Rule is to adopt national standards for safeguards to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of electronic protected health information (e-PHI) that is collected, maintained, used or transmitted by a covered entity. Compliance is different for each organization and no single strategy will serve all covered entities.” (HHS.gov)

That means that it is up to the organization to implement its own strategy and follow the requirements, or else face those hefty fines.

So that’s an overview of HIPAA compliance. Have you gone through this process? What obstacles did you face? Are you interested in building a mobile app or medical device but concerned about the regulations? Leave a comment below, or send us an email with your questions.

Further Reading:
HIPAA Compliance Developers Guide | Github
- See more at: http://www.eurekasoft.com/blog/2014/10/14/healthcare-mobile-apps-cloud-hipaa-compliance/#sthash.8iZYbXfR.dpuf

Healthcare Mobile Apps, the Cloud, and HIPAA ComplianceAuthor: Cristy Salinas   Posted: October 14th, 2014 ˑ Filled under: Cloud, Healthcare, Mobile ˑ  0 Comments


This post provides general information about HIPAA compliance for software and hardware development. Although Eureka Software has experience in this field, please consult your legal/compliance team for specific information on how to meet HIPAA compliance requirements.

Google Fit, Apple Health Kit, and even the Affordable Care Act have companies scrambling to build healthcare-focused mobile apps and/or upgrade existing medical devices. However, the process of bringing a new product to market in the healthcare industry brings about a whole other set of challenges. Not only do you have to worry about a product’s design and functionality, but now there’s the issue of HIPAA compliance and whether your product meets the criteria for FDA regulation. If you’re interested in building a healthcare-focused mobile app or medical device, don’t let these things deter you from doing so. Instead, let’s go over a few things you’ll need to be aware of before you jump in with both feet.

What is HIPAA?

The Health Insurance Portability and Privacy Act, also known as HIPAA, was first signed into law in 1996. HIPAA was written with the intent to protect individuals from having their healthcare data used or disclosed to people or agencies that have no reason to see it. It has two basic goals:

1.) Standardize the electronic exchange of data between health care organizations, providers, and clearinghouses.
2.) Protect the security and confidentiality of protective health information.

There are four rules of HIPPA, but today we’ll focus on the HIPAA Security Rule.

What is PHI?

Protected Health Information (PHI) includes medical records, billing information, phone records, email communication with medical professionals, and anything else related to the diagnosis and treatment of an individual. Examples of non-PHI include steps on your pedometer, calories burned, or medical data without personally identifiable user information (PII).

When building a healthcare app or medical device with the intent to collect, store, and share PHI with doctors and hospitals, it is absolutely mandatory make sure you’re HIPAA-compliant (or else you’ll face some hefty fines). Additionally, if you’re planning on storing data in the cloud, you must take appropriate measures to ensure you’re properly securing the data and working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service, too.

Here are some steps you’ll need to take:

Determine if your mobile app or medical device must be HIPAA-compliant.

Are you collecting, sharing, or storing personally identifiable health data with anyone who provides treatment, payment and operations in healthcare (aka a covered entity)? If yes, then you must be HIPAA-compliant.

Determine if your mobile app or medical device must FDA-regulated.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates medical devices to ensure their safety and effectiveness. If you plan to market your product as a medical device, then it may be subject to the provisions of the Federal Food Drug & Cosmetic (FD&C) Act. Find out if your product meets the definition of a medical device as defined by section 201(h) (or a radiation-emitting product as defined in Section 531) on the FDA website. (Visit Is This Product a Medical Device? for more information.) You can also contact the FDA directly if you are unsure whether your mobile app is considered a “Mobile Medical App” and will need to be FDA-regulated. (See Mobile Medical Applications.)

Work with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider.

Storing data in the cloud is appealing to the healthcare industry because of the amount of data that needs to be stored and easily accessible yet remain secure. The cloud allows individuals and businesses to store large amounts of information in massive data centers around the globe, rather than on internal servers and software. That data can be accessed from anywhere, anytime. Depending on the amount of data (which in healthcare can be A LOT), it can be more cost-effective to store data in the cloud when you account for the costs of hardware, maintenance, staff, and energy when storing locally.

That being said, you need to make sure you’re working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider, like Amazon Web Services or Google Apps, though there are several others you can consider.

Get a signed Business Associate Agreement.

Just because you’re working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider doesn’t mean you’re covered. Any vendor or subcontractor who has access to PHI is considered a Business Associate, and therefore must sign a Business Associate Agreement. That includes your cloud storage service provider.

Secure sensitive data.

Developers should take appropriate safeguards to ensure that PHI is secure and cannot be accessed by unauthorized individuals. People lose their smartphones and iPads or don’t enable passcodes at all, so it’s even more important to make sure the app or medical device is HIPAA-compliant. Things like data encryption, unique user authentication, strong passwords, and mobile wipe options are just a few requirements. See InformationWeek’s article about developers and HIPAA compliance for additional information.

Finally, there is no official certification process to ensure that you’re in compliance with HIPAA’s Security Rule. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website states:

“The purpose of the Security Rule is to adopt national standards for safeguards to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of electronic protected health information (e-PHI) that is collected, maintained, used or transmitted by a covered entity. Compliance is different for each organization and no single strategy will serve all covered entities.” (HHS.gov)

That means that it is up to the organization to implement its own strategy and follow the requirements, or else face those hefty fines.

So that’s an overview of HIPAA compliance. Have you gone through this process? What obstacles did you face? Are you interested in building a mobile app or medical device but concerned about the regulations? Leave a comment below, or send us an email with your questions.

Further Reading:
HIPAA Compliance Developers Guide | Github

- See more at: http://www.eurekasoft.com/blog/2014/10/14/healthcare-mobile-apps-cloud-hipaa-compliance/#sthash.8iZYbXfR.dpufHealthcareMobile Apps, the Cloud, and HIPAA ComplianceAuthor: Cristy Salinas   Posted: October 14th, 2014 ˑ Filled under: Cloud, Healthcare, Mobile ˑ  0 Comments


This post provides general information about HIPAA compliance for software and hardware development. Although Eureka Software has experience in this field, please consult your legal/compliance team for specific information on how to meet HIPAA compliance requirements.

Google Fit, Apple Health Kit, and even the Affordable Care Act have companies scrambling to build healthcare-focused mobile apps and/or upgrade existing medical devices. However, the process of bringing a new product to market in the healthcare industry brings about a whole other set of challenges. Not only do you have to worry about a product’s design and functionality, but now there’s the issue of HIPAA compliance and whether your product meets the criteria for FDA regulation. If you’re interested in building a healthcare-focused mobile app or medical device, don’t let these things deter you from doing so. Instead, let’s go over a few things you’ll need to be aware of before you jump in with both feet.

What is HIPAA?

The Health Insurance Portability and Privacy Act, also known as HIPAA, was first signed into law in 1996. HIPAA was written with the intent to protect individuals from having their healthcare data used or disclosed to people or agencies that have no reason to see it. It has two basic goals:

1.) Standardize the electronic exchange of data between health care organizations, providers, and clearinghouses.
2.) Protect the security and confidentiality of protective health information.

There are four rules of HIPPA, but today we’ll focus on the HIPAA Security Rule.

What is PHI?

Protected Health Information (PHI) includes medical records, billing information, phone records, email communication with medical professionals, and anything else related to the diagnosis and treatment of an individual. Examples of non-PHI include steps on your pedometer, calories burned, or medical data without personally identifiable user information (PII).

When building a healthcare app or medical device with the intent to collect, store, and share PHI with doctors and hospitals, it is absolutely mandatory make sure you’re HIPAA-compliant (or else you’ll face some hefty fines). Additionally, if you’re planning on storing data in the cloud, you must take appropriate measures to ensure you’re properly securing the data and working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service, too.

Here are some steps you’ll need to take:

Determine if your mobile app or medical device must be HIPAA-compliant.

Are you collecting, sharing, or storing personally identifiable health data with anyone who provides treatment, payment and operations in healthcare (aka a covered entity)? If yes, then you must be HIPAA-compliant.

Determine if your mobile app or medical device must FDA-regulated.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates medical devices to ensure their safety and effectiveness. If you plan to market your product as a medical device, then it may be subject to the provisions of the Federal Food Drug & Cosmetic (FD&C) Act. Find out if your product meets the definition of a medical device as defined by section 201(h) (or a radiation-emitting product as defined in Section 531) on the FDA website. (Visit Is This Product a Medical Device? for more information.) You can also contact the FDA directly if you are unsure whether your mobile app is considered a “Mobile Medical App” and will need to be FDA-regulated. (See Mobile Medical Applications.)

Work with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider.

Storing data in the cloud is appealing to the healthcare industry because of the amount of data that needs to be stored and easily accessible yet remain secure. The cloud allows individuals and businesses to store large amounts of information in massive data centers around the globe, rather than on internal servers and software. That data can be accessed from anywhere, anytime. Depending on the amount of data (which in healthcare can be A LOT), it can be more cost-effective to store data in the cloud when you account for the costs of hardware, maintenance, staff, and energy when storing locally.

That being said, you need to make sure you’re working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider, like Amazon Web Services or Google Apps, though there are several others you can consider.

Get a signed Business Associate Agreement.

Just because you’re working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider doesn’t mean you’re covered. Any vendor or subcontractor who has access to PHI is considered a Business Associate, and therefore must sign a Business Associate Agreement. That includes your cloud storage service provider.

Secure sensitive data.

Developers should take appropriate safeguards to ensure that PHI is secure and cannot be accessed by unauthorized individuals. People lose their smartphones and iPads or don’t enable passcodes at all, so it’s even more important to make sure the app or medical device is HIPAA-compliant. Things like data encryption, unique user authentication, strong passwords, and mobile wipe options are just a few requirements. See InformationWeek’s article about developers and HIPAA compliance for additional information.

Finally, there is no official certification process to ensure that you’re in compliance with HIPAA’s Security Rule. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website states:

“The purpose of the Security Rule is to adopt national standards for safeguards to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of electronic protected health information (e-PHI) that is collected, maintained, used or transmitted by a covered entity. Compliance is different for each organization and no single strategy will serve all covered entities.” (HHS.gov)

That means that it is up to the organization to implement its own strategy and follow the requirements, or else face those hefty fines.

So that’s an overview of HIPAA compliance. Have you gone through this process? What obstacles did you face? Are you interested in building a mobile app or medical device but concerned about the regulations? Leave a comment below, or send us an email with your questions.

Further Reading:
HIPAA Compliance Developers Guide | Github

- See more at: http://www.eurekasoft.com/blog/2014/10/14/healthcare-mobile-apps-cloud-hipaa-compliance/#sthash.8iZYbXfR.dpufHealthcareMobile Apps, the Cloud, and HIPAA ComplianceAuthor: Cristy Salinas   Posted: October 14th, 2014 ˑ Filled under: Cloud, Healthcare, Mobile ˑ  0 Comments


This post provides general information about HIPAA compliance for software and hardware development. Although Eureka Software has experience in this field, please consult your legal/compliance team for specific information on how to meet HIPAA compliance requirements.

Google Fit, Apple Health Kit, and even the Affordable Care Act have companies scrambling to build healthcare-focused mobile apps and/or upgrade existing medical devices. However, the process of bringing a new product to market in the healthcare industry brings about a whole other set of challenges. Not only do you have to worry about a product’s design and functionality, but now there’s the issue of HIPAA compliance and whether your product meets the criteria for FDA regulation. If you’re interested in building a healthcare-focused mobile app or medical device, don’t let these things deter you from doing so. Instead, let’s go over a few things you’ll need to be aware of before you jump in with both feet.

What is HIPAA?

The Health Insurance Portability and Privacy Act, also known as HIPAA, was first signed into law in 1996. HIPAA was written with the intent to protect individuals from having their healthcare data used or disclosed to people or agencies that have no reason to see it. It has two basic goals:

1.) Standardize the electronic exchange of data between health care organizations, providers, and clearinghouses.
2.) Protect the security and confidentiality of protective health information.

There are four rules of HIPPA, but today we’ll focus on the HIPAA Security Rule.

What is PHI?

Protected Health Information (PHI) includes medical records, billing information, phone records, email communication with medical professionals, and anything else related to the diagnosis and treatment of an individual. Examples of non-PHI include steps on your pedometer, calories burned, or medical data without personally identifiable user information (PII).

When building a healthcare app or medical device with the intent to collect, store, and share PHI with doctors and hospitals, it is absolutely mandatory make sure you’re HIPAA-compliant (or else you’ll face some hefty fines). Additionally, if you’re planning on storing data in the cloud, you must take appropriate measures to ensure you’re properly securing the data and working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service, too.

Here are some steps you’ll need to take:

Determine if your mobile app or medical device must be HIPAA-compliant.

Are you collecting, sharing, or storing personally identifiable health data with anyone who provides treatment, payment and operations in healthcare (aka a covered entity)? If yes, then you must be HIPAA-compliant.

Determine if your mobile app or medical device must FDA-regulated.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates medical devices to ensure their safety and effectiveness. If you plan to market your product as a medical device, then it may be subject to the provisions of the Federal Food Drug & Cosmetic (FD&C) Act. Find out if your product meets the definition of a medical device as defined by section 201(h) (or a radiation-emitting product as defined in Section 531) on the FDA website. (Visit Is This Product a Medical Device? for more information.) You can also contact the FDA directly if you are unsure whether your mobile app is considered a “Mobile Medical App” and will need to be FDA-regulated. (See Mobile Medical Applications.)

Work with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider.

Storing data in the cloud is appealing to the healthcare industry because of the amount of data that needs to be stored and easily accessible yet remain secure. The cloud allows individuals and businesses to store large amounts of information in massive data centers around the globe, rather than on internal servers and software. That data can be accessed from anywhere, anytime. Depending on the amount of data (which in healthcare can be A LOT), it can be more cost-effective to store data in the cloud when you account for the costs of hardware, maintenance, staff, and energy when storing locally.

That being said, you need to make sure you’re working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider, like Amazon Web Services or Google Apps, though there are several others you can consider.

Get a signed Business Associate Agreement.

Just because you’re working with a HIPAA-compliant cloud storage service provider doesn’t mean you’re covered. Any vendor or subcontractor who has access to PHI is considered a Business Associate, and therefore must sign a Business Associate Agreement. That includes your cloud storage service provider.

Secure sensitive data.

Developers should take appropriate safeguards to ensure that PHI is secure and cannot be accessed by unauthorized individuals. People lose their smartphones and iPads or don’t enable passcodes at all, so it’s even more important to make sure the app or medical device is HIPAA-compliant. Things like data encryption, unique user authentication, strong passwords, and mobile wipe options are just a few requirements. See InformationWeek’s article about developers and HIPAA compliance for additional information.

Finally, there is no official certification process to ensure that you’re in compliance with HIPAA’s Security Rule. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website states:

“The purpose of the Security Rule is to adopt national standards for safeguards to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of electronic protected health information (e-PHI) that is collected, maintained, used or transmitted by a covered entity. Compliance is different for each organization and no single strategy will serve all covered entities.” (HHS.gov)

That means that it is up to the organization to implement its own strategy and follow the requirements, or else face those hefty fines.

So that’s an overview of HIPAA compliance. Have you gone through this process? What obstacles did you face? Are you interested in building a mobile app or medical device but concerned about the regulations? Leave a comment below, or send us an email with your questions.

Further Reading:
HIPAA Compliance Developers Guide | Github

- See more at: http://www.eurekasoft.com/blog/2014/10/14/healthcare-mobile-apps-cloud-hipaa-compliance/#sthash.8iZYbXfR.dpuf


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Colloque International | Big Data et Santé Publique | Vendredi 13 février 2015

Colloque International | Big Data et Santé Publique | Vendredi 13 février 2015
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More hospitals are trying Apple HealthKit than Google Fit

"Apple is moving its health care products into hospitals far faster than rivals Google and Samsung, claims a new report from Reuters. The news agency says that 14 of the 23 top hospitals it contacted were already trialling pilot programs with Apple’s HealthKit service to monitor chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Google and Samsung, meanwhile, were reportedly only beginning talks to secure partners for their own health-monitoring systems, Google Fit and S Health. Reuters added that doctors were especially "eager" to try Google Fit."


Via Technical Dr. Inc., VAB Traductions
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Les Européens font confiance aux hôpitaux pour prendre soin de leurs données... pas aux réseaux sociaux

Les Européens font confiance aux hôpitaux pour prendre soin de leurs données... pas aux réseaux sociaux | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Dans son dernier rapport annuel "State of Privacy 2015", l'américain Symantec montre que les Européens - et plus particulièrement les Français - font davantage confiance aux secteurs de la santé et de la banque pour conserver leurs données personnelles en toute sécurité. Les grands groupes techcologiques, la distribution, e-commerce compris, et les réseaux sociaux sont en revanche pointés du doigt comme des mauvais élèves. 56 % des Français s’inquiètent ainsi de la protection de leurs données (61% chez les 35-44 ans), alors que seulement un sur cinq déclare lire complètement les conditions d’utilisation des services en ligne.

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ACOs are making progress in using big data to improve care #bigdata

ACOs are making progress in using big data to improve care #bigdata | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Accountable care organizations across the country are in sharply different stages of aggregating and using patient data to improve quality of care and reduce costs.

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Lava Prasad Kafle's curator insight, February 25, 6:22 AM

@deerwalkinc ACOs are making progress in using big data to improve care #bigdata 

Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Santé, eSanté, mSanté, santé numérique, Quantified Self et télémédecine... Toute l'actualité sur la santé de demain (en français)
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Quelle éthique pour l'usage des "big data" en santé?

Quelle éthique pour l'usage des "big data" en santé? | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

L'avènement des "big data" dans le domaine de la santé pose des problèmes nouveaux aux professionnels de santé, tant dans le domaine médical que dans le domaine judiciaire et éthique.Tribune de Jérôme Béranger (PhD), chercheur/consultant senior en éthique des systèmes d'information en santé pour le cabiner Keosys; chercheur associé au Centre éthique international/ESA Management éthique.

Le développement des systèmes de communication dans nos organisations est sans doute aujourd'hui la cause première de l'accélération des échanges, des partages et par là, de la croissance de la complexité. Désormais, la société est devenue presque inconcevable sans l'utilisation d'appareils électroniques basés sur une technologie numérique addictive, véritables prothèses mémorielles, cognitives, communicationnelles et relationnelles telles que les ordinateurs, les réseaux sociaux, les devices mobiles, les objets et capteurs connectés, les tablettes, etc.



Source: http://www.ticsante.com/story.php?story=2235&mjeton=alWUytSXA2X2HQ2bvjmjnIC8OBc_MiHhfeTFYVPK5hL8oMSC7iGcRNTBIfcDv5a9uLhmnncMF4bG5Qu-8umFKw..#ixzz3SRzaA52V


Via sylvie Royant-Parola, Celine Sportisse
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sylvie Royant-Parola's curator insight, February 22, 12:57 AM

Effectivement la création d'un tiers de confiance régulateur éthico-qualitatif sera sans doute une solution acceptable.

Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Silver Economie & e-Autonomie en Ariège Pyrénées
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Marisol Touraine (Ministre de la Santé) : "Pourquoi nous ouvrons les bases de données de santé"

Marisol Touraine (Ministre de la Santé) : "Pourquoi nous ouvrons les bases de données de santé" | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Le projet de loi Santé qui sera bientôt discuté au Parlement propose l'ouverture des bases de données santé au public.

 

La ministre Marisol Touraine nous explique pourquoi et comment : "En ouvrant - dans des conditions de transparence précisément définies - l'accès aux données de santé, le projet de loi de santé encourage les chercheurs, publics ou privés, la société civile, les professionnels de santé, mais également les entreprises, start-up ou grands groupes, à produire de la connaissance qui puisse bénéficier à la collectivité. C'est aussi cela, la démocratie sanitaire".


Via Hervé Denudt
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Experts warn 2015 could be 'Year of the Healthcare Hack'

Experts warn 2015 could be 'Year of the Healthcare Hack' | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
NEW YORK/BOSTON (Reuters) - Security experts are warning healthcare and insurance companies that 2015 will be the Year of the Healthcare Hack, as cybercriminals are increasingly attracted to troves of...

Via Technical Dr. Inc., eMedToday
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Adrián Toscano's curator insight, February 12, 3:02 PM

Tendencia de los crímenes en la web. Importante.

Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Electronic Health Information Exchange
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2015 Interoperability Standards Advisory | Policy Researchers & Implementers | HealthIT.gov

2015 Interoperability Standards Advisory | Policy Researchers & Implementers | HealthIT.gov | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Our goal is to create a ‘single, public list of standards’ to move more quickly toward #interoperability: http://t.co/gh4gBJhmc9

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Les données de santé attirent les hackers

Les données de santé attirent les hackers | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Quelques semaines après le piratage informatique de l'un des plus gros assureurs des États-Unis, les spécialistes de cybersécurité prédisent une année 2015 particulièrement sensible.

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3 ways data analytics can transform healthcare #bigdata

3 ways data analytics can transform healthcare #bigdata | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Analytics can and will change healthcare as we know it--but several obstacles remain, according to David Lee Scher, M.D., director at DLS Healthcare Consulting LLC.

Currently, data collected by healthcare entities is "warehoused in a contextual vacuum," Scher writes in his blog, "The Digital Health Corner." To truly make use of the data, analytics tools are needed to put all the pieces together, he says; to do that, data needs to be delivered in real-time while being included in workflows.

Some ways Scher says data analytics should be used in healthcare include:

Turning big data into "actionable data": Remote patient monitoring is growing, and it's a great way for systems to incorporate analytics, Scher says. Those kinds of data sets could help suggest ways to change a patient's lifestyle or care. "This is a far cry from the provider receiving a deluge of useless data for analysis," he writes. "This type of analytics can also incorporate clinical decision support based on evidence-based medicine."Creating personalized medicine: Analytics are vital to gain value from population health, clinical and digital data for individuals, Scher says. "Analytics can potentially readily address variances of diagnosis and/or treatment of a disease based on geography, race, and genomics," he writes. That also is in line with President Barack Obama's recently announced Precision Medicine Initiative, which aims to increase the use of personalized information in healthcare.Lowering care costs: Analytics can help provide transparency on healthcare costs, as well as help patients choose where to be treated. In addition, apps can help patients compare what it will cost for certain procedures, according to Scher.

He adds that analytics isn't the "Wizard of Oz of healthcare," but that "a vision of utilizing cost-effective resources such as analytics can be the best investment for success."

However, some don't see the analytics revolution coming anytime soon.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Chief Technology Officer Bryan Sivak recently said that, despite all of the strides made in health IT over the last few years, data collection efforts have hit a lull.

"One thing that's struck me ... is that we're still at the same tip of the iceberg," Sivak said at the mHealth Summit just outside of the District of Columbia in December. "My Fitbit and Misfit [Shine] and Jawbone and other devices basically do exactly the same stuff with none of the additional analysis that I think is needed to actually make these things much more useful for helping others live a better and healthier life."

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc., Celine Sportisse, Clara Hamelin
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5 Questions Every Healthcare Executive Should Ask Before Implementing Data

5 Questions Every Healthcare Executive Should Ask Before Implementing Data | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Simply waiting for your IT team to roll out the latest technology isn’t going to help you bring value to your healthcare facility. After all, technology is merely the vessel where big data sits ready to be applied to your organization.

Via Sam Stern
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Panorama du marché des éditeurs de logiciels pour les Professionnels de Santé en exercice libéral - GIE SESAM-VITALE


Via Philippe Bédère
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La "plus grande base de données médico-économiques du monde" accessible en open data courant février !

La "plus grande base de données médico-économiques du monde" accessible en open data courant février ! | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
L'ouverture des données de santé en France, c'est pour demain. L'assurance-maladie a promis de placer en accès libre sa base de données Damir sur le site data.gouv.fr courant février 2015. Annoncée au cours du premier hackathon sur des data de santé organisé en France le 26 janvier, cette décision était réclamée depuis longtemps par les industriels du secteur.

Via Hervé Denudt, Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
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Jean-Christophe Lapalut's curator insight, February 11, 5:04 AM

"Oui" pour encourager les Open Initiatives de santé publique au bénéfice de la prévention, de la détection, de l'identification de liens statistiques entre différentes pathologies, etc.

"Non" si l'anonymat des patients n'est pas préservé à 100%, et si ce sont les industriels de la pharma qui exploitent ces données à des fins marketing.

Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from [Health IT - Digital hospital - Patient portals - Healthcare professionals, social media & digital interactions with patients || Hôpital numérique & connecté - Outils numériques, médias sociaux & prof de santé - NTIC et Santé] by VAB Traductions
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Physician Office Usage of Electronic Health Records Software in the U.S

Physician Office Usage of Electronic Health Records Software in the U.S | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

"According to SK&A’s continuing study on physician office adoption of electronic health records software, usage stabilizes from a year ago. EHR data offers message targeting in a more granular way to the specific physician."


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Ouverture des données de santé : patients et Ocam mettent la pression au gouvernement

Ouverture des données de santé : patients et Ocam mettent la pression au gouvernement | 7- DATA, DATA,& MORE DATA IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

"Dans sa version actuelle, le projet de loi de santé crée un système national des données de santé (SNDS) qui centralisera les données des bases existantes et assurera leur mise à disposition selon deux modalités distinctes : « les données pour lesquelles aucune identification n’est possible seront accessibles et réutilisables par tous, en open data. Les données potentiellement identifiantes pourront être utilisées sur autorisation de la CNIL à des fins de recherche, d’étude ou d’évaluation d’intérêt public dans le domaine de la santé, ou sur autorisation par décret en Conseil d’État. » La gouvernance du système s’appuiera sur un Institut national des données de santé (groupement d’intérêt public) et la gestion de la base de données sera confiée pour l’essentiel à la Cnam. L’article 47 soumet par ailleurs les traitements de données personnelles à l’autorisation de la Cnil après avis de l’Institut national des données de santé."


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