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Rapid Industries, Inc. - A privately held company in Louisville, Kentucky manufacturing and installing I-Beam, enclosed track and power, and free conveyor systems and components. Our commitment to manufacture high quality products at the best possible prices has earned us a reputation that is second to none. Our systems are designed to accommodate all your manufacturing and material handling requirements and can be configured without taking up much floor space..

Visit www.rapidindustries.com for more information.

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Don't Do Something, Sit There! - exploreB2B

Don't Do Something, Sit There! - exploreB2B | rapidindustries | Scoop.it
 The story is told of a CEO who toured a warehouse of his corporation and he saw a young man who was propped against an I-beam, not doing anything. Each time the CEO looked in his direction, ... (Don't Do Something, Sit There!

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I, Robot Journalist: Beaming Into CES 2014 From My Kitchen - Telepresence Options

I, Robot Journalist: Beaming Into CES 2014 From My Kitchen - Telepresence Options | rapidindustries | Scoop.it
Story and images by Kashmir Hill / Forbes I've never been to the technology orgy party that is the Consumer Electronics Show. Many of my Forbes colleagues are there,

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 10, 2014 12:50 PM

Teleportation's cousin in now reality.  This is exciting technology that could change the complexion of ecollaboration.  Watch for he changes coming.

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The Emergence of Influencer Marketplaces: Part I The Influencer | Social Marketing content from Chief Marketer

The Emergence of Influencer Marketplaces: Part I The Influencer | Social Marketing content from Chief Marketer | rapidindustries | Scoop.it

Editor’s Note: This is Part 1 in a two-part series on influencer marketplaces, which comprise brand marketers and social partners. Part II will focus on the role of brand marketers.

 

                              Most industries that experience rapid technology gains tend to remain fragmented for several years or decades before integrated platforms and exchanges emerge. As an example, the digital advertising space remained fragmented for both brands and publishers until ad networks began consolidating. DoubleClick emerged as a giant when it created a software-driven exchange that allowed brands and agencies to buy inventory from a network of integrated publishers. Standalone solutions gave way to a marketplace where brands could buy ad inventory on vertically relevant websites.

                              As influencer marketing matures as a marketing channel, the industry will begin to seek out similar integrated marketplaces where brands and social influencers can partner, create co-branded content, distribute that content to digital assets across the web, and get performance analytics to help measure reach, engagement, and overall ROI. All marketplaces assume two critical players, the sellers and buyers who represent supply and demand. Let’s take a dive deeper into the world of the supplier, the online influencer.


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Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 12, 2013 3:43 PM

A good review of what it means to be an influencer and how its done.

Bernard Jaffe 's curator insight, May 14, 2013 6:17 PM

Influence Marketplaces part 1. by #chiefmarketer.com

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C.D. HOWE INSTITUTE | Sharing the Water: How to Manage the Mackenzie River Basin

Sharing the Water: How to Manage the Mackenzie River Basin

TORONTO, Feb. 22, 2012 /CNW/ - The prairies' experience in handling inter-provincial conflicts over water-use may point the way to success in the Mackenzie River Basin, according to a report released today by the C.D. Howe Institute. In Resolving Water-Use Conflicts: Insights from the Prairie Experience for the Mackenzie River Basin, law professor David Percy says a cooperative approach led the prairie provinces to a basic agreement on water sharing that works; and a similar approach could help kick-start progress in the more complex issues facing the Mackenzie River Basin.

"It's been 40 years since governments starting talking about a water-sharing agreement for the Mackenzie Basin," said Professor Percy of the University of Alberta. "A generation later, a growing population and rapid development associated with the oil sands and other industries, especially in the Peace-Athabasca system, have added urgency to the task."

Professor Percy notes that in 1969, after a prolonged period of disagreement between Alberta and Saskatchewan over conflicting priorities for the use of prairie rivers, the two provinces joined with the governments of Manitoba and Canada in an arrangement known as the Apportionment Agreement. The Agreement, based on the idea that each upstream province would allow one-half of the natural flow of the rivers to pass to its downstream neighbours, later was extended to groundwater and water pollution.

Professor Percy thinks a similarly modest approach could work for the Mackenzie Basin, where the governments of Canada, Alberta, Saskatchewan and British Columbia, as well as the Yukon and Northwest Territories, are now attempting to negotiate an agreement for the management of the entire aquatic eco-system, which extends over an area of more than 1.8 million square kilometers.

"Over the years, water sharing negotiations have grown to cover the whole eco-system of the Mackenzie Basin," he notes. "A more bite-sized approach, beginning with a simple water sharing rule, might provide a more workable starting point."

The history in the southern prairies, says Percy, suggests that more progress might be had if governments first sought agreement on the basics of minimum flow regimes and water quality objectives. This would set the foundations of the trust that would enable the provinces and Canada to reach toward a more comprehensive agreement, with better prospects for success.

For the report go to: http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/Commentary_341.pdf

For further information:Professor David Percy, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta; Colin Busby, Senior Policy Analyst, C.D. Howe Institute, 416-865-1904; cdhowe@cdhowe.org


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Beamz by Flo is the perfect gift for those that can't play an instrument

Beamz by Flo is the perfect gift for those that can't play an instrument | rapidindustries | Scoop.it
If you're looking for a gift for the music lover, I highly recommend you check out Beamz by Flo, an interactive laser-based bit of kit that allows you to make music by waving your fingers through one of four laser beams.

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I-BeamDesign pallet house - Recyclart

I-BeamDesign pallet house - Recyclart | rapidindustries | Scoop.it
Prototype built for Prince Charles Royal Gardens in conjunction with IBM, The Financial Times, and The Earth Awards. - LONDON, UK. 2010 This shelter was de

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Brand and Reputation Management: Four Insights | Social Media Today

Brand and Reputation Management: Four Insights | Social Media Today | rapidindustries | Scoop.it

I was recently asked a provocative question: “What experiences or insights have shaped your views on brand and reputation management in today’s business environment?” This is a great question and the more I thought about it, the clearer the answer(s) became. 1. The first insight reflects the The Changing Role of Influence. There is a great quote by Gary Hamel, who says “Influence is like water. Always flowing somewhere.” This is very true in today's business environment as new sources of influence are forming around our companies and industries at an extremely rapid pace....


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Liz Reid's curator insight, August 22, 2013 4:04 AM

This article highlights the current state of marketing, and the need to change, adapt and look to the future in order to implement successful marketing strategies. For example, there is a serious need to adapt and change marketing strategies in line with changes in a companys' consumers. Too often companies carry on as they always have because it was successful at the time. However, in our increasingly fragmented and digitalised society, brands must keep up with these changes in order to stay popular or trusted. It is also necessary to converse with consumers. No longer can all brands be successful with top-down, authoritarian communication. They must involve consumers in brand discussions in order to make progress. For example, many chip brands have created campaigns where consumers suggest new chip flavours that could potentially be put into production. This demonstrates including consumers in a brand's discourse and giving consumers the chance to influence a brand's image. These are important concepts in terms of engagement, communicating with consumers and brand management. 

Finau Tuipulotu's comment, August 22, 2013 8:22 PM
Savanna, I’ve picked up the line where it says “Most companies today are not approachable and lack of personality or an image that people can relate to”. The redbull example you have used is funny but so true. Furthermore, Companies needs to define where they sit in the market and continue to build brand relationships effectively. Marketing tactics changes everyday and brand reputation becomes more and more important. Therefore, useful insights stated in this article should be taken into account in order to be a successful company.
Anna Bairstow's comment, August 22, 2013 10:56 PM
Really good choice of an article Savanna, this closely relates to what we discussed in class in terms of branding and brand management! What I found interesting, is an issue raised in the beginning of the article, about communication and marketing platforms and one-to-one relationship models being disrupted in today's society. This is a consequence of the advanced technology and access to social media we all have, and like Finau pointed out, we need to constantly and cohesively change and adapt our way of marketing and communicating to audiences.