Random Overlaps
Follow
Find
420 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Movements
onto Random Overlaps
Scoop.it!

Network Society Catalyzes Social Movements

Network Society Catalyzes Social Movements | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Read about how network society, the interactions between technology and people, has brought people together to create major social movements.

Via Cathryn Wellner, Patricia Thompson
Liz Rykert's insight:

Thanks Pat Thompson for finding this gem. Interesting to see integration of movements and networks.

more...
june holley's curator insight, February 23, 2014 1:22 PM

Looking forward to reading this.

Leadership Learning Community's curator insight, February 23, 2014 6:17 PM

I just got a copy and will summarize soon.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from networks and network weaving
Scoop.it!

Imagining social movements: from networks to dynamic systems

Imagining social movements: from networks to dynamic systems | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
We must move to an understanding of networks as constantly changing and dynamic; no two 'links' are alike.

Via june holley
Liz Rykert's insight:

Thanks June Holley for this scoop. It is a concise analysis of networks in the context of social movements in Europe. 

more...
Diego Mora's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:35 AM

Nuevas comprensiones de los movimientos sociales, de redes a sistemas dinámicos.

Francisco Restivo's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:42 PM

Really interesting.

Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

Mind meld

Mind meld | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Interdisciplinary science must break down barriers between fields to build common ground.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Nature has a whole issue dedicated to interdisciplinary work. The challenges we face today require a "greater than the sum our parts" approach. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

Manuel Lima: A visual history of human knowledge | TED Talk | TED.com

Manuel Lima: A visual history of human knowledge | TED Talk | TED.com | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
How does knowledge grow? Sometimes it begins with one insight and grows into many branches; other times it grows as a complex and interconnected network. Infographics expert Manuel Lima explores the thousand-year history of mapping data -- from languages to dynasties -- using trees and networks of information. It's a fascinating history of visualizations, and a look into humanity's urge to map what we know.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Great story told by Manuel Lima of how we have instinctively mapped knowledge over time and the shift we see today from hierarchies to networks. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Talks
Scoop.it!

Civilization Far From Equilibrium - Energy, Complexity, and Human Survival

Human societies use complexity -- within their institutions and technologies -- to address their various problems, and they need high-quality energy to create and sustain this complexity. But now greater complexity is producing diminishing returns in wellbeing, while the energetic cost of key sources of energy is rising fast. Simultaneously, humankind's problems are becoming vastly harder, which requires societies to deliver yet more complexity and thus consume yet more energy. Resolving this paradox is the central challenge of the 21st century. Thomas Homer-Dixon holds the CIGI Chair of Global Systems at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Canada, and is a Professor at the University of Waterloo.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Vf-y3mv57U


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

The Stories We Lead By: 4 Steps to Conscious Authorship

The Stories We Lead By:  4 Steps to Conscious Authorship | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
The Scene. It was a case of art imitating life. Literally.After a Friday morning full of client appointments, I drove to the airport and boarded a flight to Orlando. I had booked myself into a “creative expression” workshop on a whim several days ago and was now headed to a weekend full of painting.Which is all very well and good – who wouldn’t savor two days in Orlando when leaving behind 5 degrees-below-zero weather at home? Just one problem.I don’t paint.At all.Haven’t picked up a paintbrush
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

What Does Mindfulness Meditation Do to Your Brain? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

What Does Mindfulness Meditation Do to Your Brain? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
As you read this, wiggle your toes. Feel the way they push against your shoes, and the weight of your feet on the floor. Really think ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

Building and Using the Theory of Collaborative Advantage

Building and Using the Theory of Collaborative Advantage
Liz Rykert's insight:

Useful article (book chapter) on building and managing inter-organizational networks. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from networks and network weaving
Scoop.it!

▶ Nicholas Christakis: The Sociological Science Behind Social Networks and Social Influence - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

Via june holley
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Papers
Scoop.it!

Network Structure and Community Evolution on Twitter: Human Behavior Change in Response to the 2011 Japanese Earthquake and Tsunami

Network Structure and Community Evolution on Twitter: Human Behavior Change in Response to the 2011 Japanese Earthquake and Tsunami | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

To investigate the dynamics of social networks and the formation and evolution of online communities in response to extreme events, we collected three datasets from Twitter shortly before and after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan. We find that while almost all users increased their online activity after the earthquake, Japanese speakers, who are assumed to be more directly affected by the event, expanded the network of people they interact with to a much higher degree than English speakers or the global average. By investigating the evolution of communities, we find that the behavior of joining or quitting a community is far from random: users tend to stay in their current status and are less likely to join new communities from solitary or shift to other communities from their current community. While non-Japanese speakers did not change their conversation topics significantly after the earthquake, nearly all Japanese users changed their conversations to earthquake-related content. This study builds a systematic framework for investigating human behaviors under extreme events with online social network data and our findings on the dynamics of networks and communities may provide useful insight for understanding how patterns of social interaction are influenced by extreme events.


Network Structure and Community Evolution on Twitter: Human Behavior Change in Response to the 2011 Japanese Earthquake and Tsunami
• Xin Lu & Christa Brelsford

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 6773 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep06773


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

How to Manage a Creative Organization

How to Manage a Creative Organization | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
What allows a creative enterprise—a film studio, a design firm, a start-up—to flourish? It's an old question, but one that has become increasingly relevant in the transition to an information economy. In the new book Collective…

Via june holley
Liz Rykert's insight:

Check out the new book referenced in the article - Collective Genius: The Art and Practice of Leading Innovation. 

http://collectivegeniusbook.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

Card Stacks - Vox

Intersting exampl eof Vox is a general interest news site for the 21st century. Its mission is simple: Explain the news. Politics, public policy, world affairs, pop culture, science, business, food, sports, and everything else that matters are part of our editorial ambit. Our goal is to move people from curiosity to understanding.

Liz Rykert's insight:

Interesting example of how to present content online in ways that support browsing and exploring and help people go deep when they need or want to. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Business DNA (Design-Thinking)
Scoop.it!

Design Thinking: Learn How to Solve Problems Like a Designer – Design School

Design Thinking: Learn How to Solve Problems Like a Designer – Design School | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Solve problems like a designer by mastering the design thinking process.

Via A. Kosuke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Papers
Scoop.it!

Detecting global bridges in networks

The identification of nodes occupying important positions in a network structure is crucial for the understanding of the associated real-world system. Usually, betweenness centrality is used to evaluate a node capacity to connect different graph regions. However, we argue here that this measure is not adapted for that task, as it gives equal weight to "local" centers (i.e. nodes of high degree central to a single region) and to "global" bridges, which connect different communities. This distinction is important as the roles of such nodes are different in terms of the local and global organisation of the network structure. In this paper we propose a decomposition of betweenness centrality into two terms, one highlighting the local contributions and the other the global ones. We call the latter bridgeness centrality and show that it is capable to specifically spot out global bridges. In addition, we introduce an effective algorithmic implementation of this measure and demonstrate its capability to identify global bridges in air transportation and scientific collaboration networks.


Detecting global bridges in networks
Pablo Jensen, Matteo Morini, Marton Karsai, Tommaso Venturini, Alessandro Vespignani, Mathieu Jacomy, Jean-Philippe Cointet, Pierre Merckle, Eric Fleury

http://arxiv.org/abs/1509.08295


Via Complexity Digest
Liz Rykert's insight:

This paper looks useful from the perspective of finding and supporting key nodes who help the whole network connect. 

more...
Barry Schachter's curator insight, October 10, 2015 4:25 PM

financial networks, too!

Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Talks
Scoop.it!

Programming bacteria to detect cancer (and maybe treat it)

Programming bacteria to detect cancer (and maybe treat it) | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

Liver cancer is one of the most difficult cancers to detect, but synthetic biologist Tal Danino had a left-field thought: What if we could create a probiotic, edible bacteria that was "programmed" to find liver tumors? His insight exploits something we're just beginning to understand about bacteria: their power of quorum sensing, or doing something together once they reach critical mass. Danino, a TED Fellow, explains how quorum sensing works — and how clever bacteria working together could someday change cancer treatment.


http://go.ted.com/b48E 


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from CxBooks
Scoop.it!

Atlas of Knowledge: Anyone Can Map

Atlas of Knowledge: Anyone Can Map | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

In an age of information overload, the ability to make sense of vast amounts of data and to render insightful visualizations is as important as the ability to read and write. The Atlas of Knowledge explains and exemplifies the power of visualizations not only to help locate us in physical space but also to help us understand the extent and structure of our collective knowledge, to identify bursts of activity, pathways of ideas, and borders that beg to be crossed. 


Atlas of Knowledge: Anyone Can Map
by Katy Börner

http://scimaps.org/atlas2


Via Complexity Digest
Liz Rykert's insight:

I love tools for mapping things - the visual is always so powerful.

more...
Complexity Digest's curator insight, March 5, 2015 5:46 AM

See Also Information Visualization MOOC (http://ivmooc.cns.iu.edu ).

Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

Beyond Forecasting: Creating New Strategic Narratives | MIT Sloan Management Review

Beyond Forecasting: Creating New Strategic Narratives | MIT Sloan Management Review | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
In turbulent markets, managers can build momentum for innovative strategies by rethinking the past, reconsidering present concerns – and reimagining the future.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

How not to say the wrong thing

How not to say the wrong thing | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
When Susan had breast cancer , we heard a lot of lame remarks, but our favorite came from one of Susan's colleagues. She wanted, she needed, to visit Susan after the surgery, but Susan didn't feel like having visitors, and she said so. Her colleague's response? "This isn't just about you."
Liz Rykert's insight:

Great article to share with people who get awkward when confronted with challenging situations. Great read. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

A Better Way Out by Marcia Angell

A Better Way Out by Marcia Angell | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
In his newest and best book, the surgeon Atul Gawande lets us have it right between the eyes: no matter how careful we are or healthful our habits, like everyone else, we will die, and probably after a long period of decline and debility.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Review and description of the new book by Atul Gawande. Looks very interesting. I feel like these issues of care for the elderly and how we manage our deaths is one that needs so much more thought and attention and action. I am picking up this book based on this review.


Here is the book:

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End

by Atul Gawande
Metropolitan, 282 pp., $26.00
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

Social and Geographical Boundaries Around Senior Nurse and Physic...: ingentaconnect

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

15 Phrases That Will Change Your Life In 2015

15 Phrases That Will Change Your Life In 2015 | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
As the new year approaches, many of us will resolve to transform our bodies -- but what about our minds?

Giving ourselves a mental makeover could be just as important as giving ourselves a physical one. But accomplishing that doesn't just lie in c...
Liz Rykert's insight:

I love this time of year when all the "best of.." or "Top Ten" lists appear. I particularly liked this one. My fav was how it is more powerful to say "I don't..." as opposed to I can't..."


For example research has found you are much more successful at keeping your resolutions around food if you say:  I don't eat cookies rather than I can't eat cookies.  


I am thinking this might be useful right about now. :)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liz Rykert
Scoop.it!

The Fertile Unknown: Improv Theater and Complex Adaptive Systems

The Fertile Unknown: Improv Theater and Complex Adaptive Systems | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
I am in an improvisational theater performing group. We improvise full-length plays with nothing planned in advance. No structure. No outline. No character or plot development. Nothing, except for 2 locations we get from the audience at the beginning of...
Liz Rykert's insight:

Love the seven simple rules identified for improv and complex adaptive systems. Thanks to Lisa Kimball for tweeting this story!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Papers
Scoop.it!

Technological integration and hyperconnectivity: Tools for promoting extreme human lifespans

Artificial, neurobiological, and social networks are three distinct complex adaptive systems (CASs), each containing discrete processing units (nodes, neurons, and humans, respectively). Despite the apparent differences, these three networks are bound by common underlying principles which describe the behavior of the system in terms of the connections of its components, and its emergent properties. The longevity (long-term retention and functionality) of the components of each of these systems is also defined by common principles. Here, I will examine some properties of the longevity and function of the components of artificial and neurobiological systems, and generalize these to the longevity and function of the components of social CAS. In other words, I will show that principles governing the long-term functionality of computer nodes and of neurons, may be extrapolated to the study of the long-term functionality of humans (or more precisely, of the noemes, an abstract combination of “existence” and “digital fame”). The study of these phenomena can provide useful insights regarding practical ways that can be used to maximize human longevity. The basic law governing these behaviors is the “Law of Requisite Usefulness,” which states that the length of retention of an agent within a CAS is proportional to the agent's contribution to the overall adaptability of the system.


Technological integration and hyperconnectivity: Tools for promoting extreme human lifespans
Marios Kyriazis

Complexity
Early View

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cplx.21626


Via Complexity Digest
Liz Rykert's insight:

Interesting article that looks at neural networks and computer networks and human networks and concludes one can learn form these two and apply them to human networks.


Quote: "show that principles governing the long-term functionality of computer nodes and of neurons, may be extrapolated to the study of the long-term functionality of humans"

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Technology Unlocks the Mysteries of Bird Flight

Technology Unlocks the Mysteries of Bird Flight | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
As long as there have been people watching birds, there have been theories as to how and why they do what they do. In the modern era, theories about why birds flock and why they migrate in v-formations have abounded, yet answers have been few. But new research using creative technology on both starling murmurations and bald ibis’ migration reveals that complex flight dynamics and rapid-fire adjustments based on sensory feedback previously believed impossible for birds are indeed occurring.

Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.