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▶ Chaos, Complexity, and Public Policy

Irene Sanders Executive Director and Founder of the Washington Center for Complexity and Public Policy and author of "Strategic Thinking and the New Science: Planning in the Midst of Chaos, Complexity, and Change."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXxs-JtvkkQ


Via Complexity Digest
Liz Rykert's insight:

Loving these new video resources for understanding complexity and it applications.

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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 11, 11:09 AM

A way cool panel discussion.  I wish I could be a full practitioner of this new, empirically based governing and political strategic thinking.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 23, 6:16 PM

are our politicians aware of these concepts?

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Complexity: A Very Short Introduction (by John H. Holland)

The importance of complexity is well-captured by Hawking's comment: "Complexity is the science of the 21st century". From the movement of flocks of birds to the Internet, environmental sustainability, and market regulation, the study and understanding of complex non-linear systems has become highly influential over the last 30 years.

In this Very Short Introduction, one of the leading figures in the field, John Holland, introduces the key elements and conceptual framework of complexity. From complex physical systems such as fluid flow and the difficulties of predicting weather, to complex adaptive systems such as the highly diverse and interdependent ecosystems of rainforests, he combines simple, well-known examples -- Adam Smith's pin factory, Darwin's comet orchid, and Simon's 'watchmaker' -- with an account of
the approaches, involving agents and urn models, taken by complexity theory.

 

 


Via Complexity Digest
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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 16, 12:34 AM

Very good overrview

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Build trust, embrace networks, manage complexity

Build trust, embrace networks, manage complexity | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Liz Rykert's insight:

the title says it all: Build trust, embrace networks, manage complexity

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Measurefest: network mapping and visualising relative #influence | #SNA #dataviz #tools

Measurefest: network mapping and visualising relative #influence | #SNA #dataviz #tools | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Last week I spoke at Measurefest. The topic of my talk was, "Network mapping and visualising relative influence"

Via luiy, june holley
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luiy's curator insight, May 30, 3:55 AM

Using conversational data from influencer networks to inform and evaluate content strategy.

 

Use an author based query (not keyword based) to grab everything they’re saying (e.g. our primary @measurefest influencer list). Then without bias, we can see what topics are being discussed right now amongst this group. This can then be used to inform content planning decisions.

 

Inform:What are your target audience / influencers talking about?Evaluate:Have you managed to influence the conversation with your content?What volume of mentions from your target audience relate to your content?Basic influencer identificationFinds generally influential people onlineWho define themselves as experts, or talk a lot about a topicAdvanced influencer network mappingConsiders the relevance of an influencer within a niche networkCreates a visual to illustrate the value of the method to senior stakeholders

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The Systems View of Life: A Unifying Vision (by Fritjof Capra and Pier Luigi Luisi)

The Systems View of Life: A Unifying Vision

~ Pier Luigi Luisi (author) More about this product
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Over the past thirty years, a new systemic conception of life has emerged at the forefront of science. New emphasis has been given to complexity, networks, and patterns of organisation leading to a novel kind of 'systemic' thinking. This volume integrates the ideas, models, and theories underlying the systems view of life into a single coherent framework. Taking a broad sweep through history and across scientific disciplines, the authors examine the appearance of key concepts such as autopoiesis, dissipative structures, social networks, and a systemic understanding of evolution. The implications of the systems view of life for health care, management, and our global ecological and economic crises are also discussed. Written primarily for undergraduates, it is also essential reading for graduate students and researchers interested in understanding the new systemic conception of life and its implications for a broad range of professions - from economics and politics to medicine, psychology and law.


Via Complexity Digest
Liz Rykert's insight:

Looking forward to this book. Friitjof Capra is an accessible writer  who was one of the people to really get me thinking about seeing whith a whole systems lens.

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50 Ways to Get a Job That Makes Good

50 Ways to Get a Job That Makes Good | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
An interactive site that gives you all the steps you need to take to find a job that makes money and does good.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Love this new site - thanks to Arti Freeman for sharing! 

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Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Economic Networks - Networked Economy
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Jeremiah Owyang - Timeline Photos

Jeremiah Owyang - Timeline Photos | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

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Five Trends to Watch in Higher Education

Five Trends to Watch in Higher Education | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
U.S. universities and colleges face a host of challenges. But a number of large and small experiments across the nation point the way forward.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Interesting to watch impact of shifts due to huge disintermediaiton trends out there  - shifting from hierarchical structures to distributed networked ones.

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Are behavioural science and design the building blocks of innovation?

Are behavioural science and design the building blocks of innovation? | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Behavioural design has the potential to bridge the gap between research and practice to revolutionise how we tackle social issues.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Good short piece on the need to combine perspectives and approaches for collaboration to solve complex problems. Shares Design Councils Design Thinking Model.


Thanks @paulinemeijer for the tweet:


Are behavioural science and design the building blocks of innovation? - http://mf.tt/d1PGu  Design Council - @edwardgardiner

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Taking On Adam Smith (and Karl Marx)

Taking On Adam Smith (and Karl Marx) | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
With his book “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” Thomas Piketty has written a blockbuster in the world of economics.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Exciting new book by Thomas Picketty on Economic Inequality - the article form the NYTimes summarizes it well and includes some key steps for action. The essence is that economies and wages grow more slowly than the rates of return on investments and capital. Here is a quote from the article:


"A higher than normal rate of population and economic growth helped reduce inequality, along with higher taxes on the wealthy. But the professional and political assumption of the 1950s and 1960s, that inequality would stabilize and diminish on its own, proved to be an illusion. We are now back to a traditional pattern of returns on capital of 4 percent to 5 percent a year and rates of economic growth of around 1.5 percent a year.


So inequality has been quickly gathering pace, aided to some degree by the Reagan and Thatcher doctrines of tax cuts for the wealthy. “Trickle-down economics could have been true,” Mr. Piketty said simply. “It just happened to be wrong."


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Art of collaboration: when creatives, coders and councils join forces

Art of collaboration: when creatives, coders and councils join forces | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
US documentary about Hurricane Sandy and neighbourhood reconstruction shows councils should support creative projects

Via june holley
Liz Rykert's insight:

Thanks June for this great Scoop!

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june holley's curator insight, April 5, 4:52 AM

Great examples of self-organizing in here.

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Crisis Responses and Crisis Management: what can we learn from Biological Networks?

The generality of network properties allows the utilization of the ‘wisdom’ of biological systems surviving crisis events for many millions of years. Yeast protein-protein interaction network shows a decrease in community-overlap (an increase in community cohesion) in stress. Community rearrangement seems to be a cost-efficient, general crisis-management response of complex systems. Inter-community bridges, such as the highly dynamic ‘creative nodes’ emerge as crucial determinants helping crisis survival.


Crisis Responses and Crisis Management: what can we learn from Biological Networks?
Péter Csermely, Agoston Mihalik, Zsolt Vassy, András London

Systema: connecting matter, life, culture and technology

Vol 2, No 1 (2014)

http://www.systema-journal.org/article/view/115 


Via Complexity Digest
Liz Rykert's insight:

Love the insights generated by looking at existing systems and how one could apply or learn from how they function in a different context - rich with insight and ideas.

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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 13, 3:54 PM

Interesting.

 

Check it out.

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Complexity 4

Vimeo is the home for high-quality videos and the people who love them.
Liz Rykert's insight:

This is one of a series of short nicely produced videos on complexity concepts. This one deals with the shift from certainty to uncertainty - from Newtons laws to a more ambiguous emergent understanding of the world.

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The strength of ‘weak signals’ | McKinsey & Company

The strength of ‘weak signals’ | McKinsey & Company | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Snippets of information, often hidden in social-media streams, offer companies a valuable new tool for staying ahead. A McKinsey Quarterly article.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Has a strong corporate focus - listening for opportunities in the marketplace - but for me the idea of finding ways to listen for the weak signals relates to leveraging the weak ties in networks. It is looking for the opportunities that may be right in front of you, either as content or as a potential connection or collaboration. How you tune-in to the these gems and act on them is key.

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Early Warning Signs in Social-Ecological Networks

Early Warning Signs in Social-Ecological Networks | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

A number of social-ecological systems exhibit complex behavior associated with nonlinearities, bifurcations, and interaction with stochastic drivers. These systems are often prone to abrupt and unexpected instabilities and state shifts that emerge as a discontinuous response to gradual changes in environmental drivers. Predicting such behaviors is crucial to the prevention of or preparation for unwanted regime shifts. Recent research in ecology has investigated early warning signs that anticipate the divergence of univariate ecosystem dynamics from a stable attractor. To date, leading indicators of instability in systems with multiple interacting components have remained poorly investigated. This is a major limitation in the understanding of the dynamics of complex social-ecological networks. Here, we develop a theoretical framework to demonstrate that rising variance—measured, for example, by the maximum element of the covariance matrix of the network—is an effective leading indicator of network instability. We show that its reliability and robustness depend more on the sign of the interactions within the network than the network structure or noise intensity. Mutualistic, scale free and small world networks are less stable than their antagonistic or random counterparts but their instability is more reliably predicted by this leading indicator. These results provide new advances in multidimensional early warning analysis and offer a framework to evaluate the resilience of social-ecological networks.


Early Warning Signs in Social-Ecological Networks.

PLoS ONE 9(7): e101851. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101851 (2014)

Suweis Samir, D'Odorico Paolo


Code of the analysis available at https://github.com/suweis


http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0101851


Via Complexity Digest
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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 31, 12:24 AM

Reliably unreliable systems interacting

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Multiple percolation transitions in a configuration model of a network of networks

Multiple percolation transitions in a configuration model of a network of networks | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

Recently much attention has been paid to the study of the robustness of interdependent and multiplex networks and, in particular, the networks of networks. The robustness of interdependent networks can be evaluated by the size of a mutually connected component when a fraction of nodes have been removed from these networks. Here we characterize the emergence of the mutually connected component in a network of networks in which every node of a network (layer) alpha is connected with q_alpha its randomly chosen replicas in some other networks and is interdependent of these nodes with probability r. We find that when the superdegrees q_alpha of different layers in a network of networks are distributed heterogeneously, multiple percolation phase transition can occur. We show that, depending on the value of r, these transition are continuous or discontinuous.


Via Claudia Mihai, Complexity Digest
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Innovation Is Not the Holy Grail (SSIR)

Innovation Is Not the Holy Grail (SSIR) | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
It is time to move from innovation as an ideology to innovation as a process.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Important conversation about Innovation in the social sector. Three points highlighted: 


"First, innovation is often perceived as a development shortcut; thus innovation becomes overrated. The tremendous value that is created by incremental improvements of the core, routine activities of social sector organizations gets sidelined. Therefore pushing innovation at the expense of strengthening more routine activities may actually destroy rather than create value.


Second, innovation in social sector organizations often has little external impact to show when it is enacted in unpredictable environments. Even proven innovations often fail when transferred to a different context. Yet the cumulative learning from failures may be tremendously valuable in understanding how a particular context ticks. This potentially builds and strengthens an organization’s capacity for productive innovation over time. In other words, if we evaluate innovation primarily by its outcome in the form of external impact, we may undervalue the positive internal organizational impact that comes from learning from failed innovation.


Third, the hoped-for success factors for innovation that researchers and consultants have identified ignore the power of negative organizational factors, such as bad leadership, dysfunctional teams, and overambitious production goals."


Worth the read...

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Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Digital Presentations in Education
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Sprites - create infographics on the web

Sprites - create infographics on the web | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Sprites is a free tool for creating beautiful animated infographics for the Web.

Via Baiba Svenca
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Erin Walsh's curator insight, May 22, 11:55 AM

Infographics are a great way to grab someones attention and get your information out there

Marja Oilinki's curator insight, May 23, 2:21 AM

Toistaiseksi Pro-versiona ilmainen melkoisen intuitiivisesti toimiva ja tyylikäs infografiikkatyökalu Sprites sopii yhteen Googlen työkalujen kanssa. Esimerkiksi tilaston muuttaminen havainnolliseen muotoon on todella helppoa. 

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, May 30, 4:54 AM

I love an infographic!  Such a great way to get information across to visual learners.  Right now you can sign up for a free pro account!  

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▶ Jeffrey Johnson: From networks to hypernetworks in complex systems science

Complex systems have multilevel dynamics emerging from interactions between their parts. Networks have provided deep insights into those dynamics, but only represent relations between two things while the generality is relations between many things. Hypergraphs and their related Galois connections have long been used to model such relations, but their set theoretic nature has inadequate and inappropriate structure. Simplicial complexes can better represent relations between many things but they too have limitations. Hypersimplices, which are defined as simplices in which the relational structure is explicit, overcome these limitations. Hypernetworks, which in the simplest cases are sets of hypersimplices, have a multidimensional connectivity structure which constrains those dynamics represented by patterns of numbers over the hypersimplices and their vertices. The dynamics of hypernetwork also involve the formation and disintegration of hypersimplices, which are seen as structural events related to system time. Hypernetworks provide algebraic structure able to represent multilevel systems and combine their top-down and bottom-up micro, meso and macro-dynamics. Hypernetworks naturally generalise graphs, hypergraphs and networks. These ideas will be presented in a graphical way through examples which also show the relevance of hypernetworks to policy. It will be argued that hypernetworks are necessary if not sufficient for a science of complex systems and its applications. The talk will be aimed at a general audience and no prior knowledge will be assumed.


10th ECCO / GBI seminar series. Spring 2014


From networks to hypernetworks in complex systems science



April 18, 2014, Brussels



Jeffrey Johnson
Open University, UK



Slides, references and more: http://ecco.vub.ac.be/?q=node/231 


Via Complexity Digest
Liz Rykert's insight:

I am fascinated with the role of networks in complex systems as the scaffolds that connect and conduct.  

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Are You Ready to Lose Control?

Are You Ready to Lose Control? | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

Control: It’s the essence of management. We’re trained to measure inputs, throughputs, and outputs in hopes of increasing efficiency and producing desired results. In a world of linear processes, such as in the factories of the Industrial Age, that made sense. But in today’s knowledge economy, where enterprises are complex, adaptive systems, it’s counterproductive.


The real problem is confusion between control and order. Control implies centralized control and hierarchical relationships. The person with control tells others what to do and whether they are successful or not. Order, on the other hand, emerges from self-organization. There may not be anyone telling others what to do, yet things get done—often with great efficiency and effectiveness. People know what is expected of them and what they can expect of others.


But how can this be true? Mustn’t an orchestra have a conductor? A dance troupe, a choreographer? A company, a CEO?


Not necessarily. Nature abounds with examples of what is known as swarm intelligence. Termites build intricate dwellings without the benefit of set of plans or engineers with advanced degrees. Birds migrate thousands of miles in formations where the lead position rotates to optimize their collective capacity. There are no marching orders or hierarchies dictating who leads. Massive flocks of starlings engage in intricate maneuvers known as murmuration with neither collisions nor confusion. There is order without overarching control. Indeed, our obsession with control helps explain why human-designed organizations fail to achieve such beautiful synchronicity.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Steve Bax's comment, April 23, 1:42 AM
This ties with the Belasco and Stayer thinking. Humans tend to seek control. Feeling out of control of ourselves and our lives can cause physiological effects. So passing it to others is tough.
Steve Bax's curator insight, April 23, 1:43 AM

Another stimulating scoop from Kenneth. This ties with the Buffalo and Geese theory from Belasco and Stayer. Passing control to others is not always easy. 

Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, June 5, 2:12 AM

Good blog on the difference between 'control' and 'order' (and what we can learn from swarms)

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The Anatomy of Facebook: A Quick Guide to the Facebook Ecosystem For Brands | Simply Measured

The Anatomy of Facebook: A Quick Guide to the Facebook Ecosystem For Brands | Simply Measured | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Facebook has become more than just a central component of online life; its a fixture of modern culture. Facebook is the world’s second most frequented website, with nearly 1.19 billion monthly active users, nearly 80% of which come from outside the US and Canada. In the US, 71% of online adults use Facebook, 63% of whom…
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Complexity Rising: From Human Beings to Human Civilization, a Complexity Profile | NECSI

Complexity Rising: From Human Beings to Human Civilization, a Complexity Profile | NECSI | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
The New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI) is an independent educational and research institution dedicated to advancing the study of complex systems.
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The Strange New Science of Chaos - YouTube

A 1989 program, with Lorenz


Via Bernard Ryefield, Complexity Digest
Liz Rykert's insight:

Great to hear Lorenz

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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 31, 12:08 PM

I <3 Science.

It just keeps learning more and more about the universe, ourselves and ourselves within the universe.

It doesn't stop, until we stop.

 

The lessons that are discussed here are applicable to our social sciences and questions of governance, especially the non-linear nature of society, economy and social psychology and the importance of initial conditions.

 

It's not a stable universe.

 

And we're living and apart of the instability!

 

Think about it.

Vasileios Basios's curator insight, April 1, 6:43 AM

Wow! such a rare delightful material .... Ralph Abraham and Lorenz who could imagine!

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 16, 5:31 AM

to be watched by the new generations!  old certitudes and new doubts?

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Modeling Complex Systems for Public Policies – a book project

The Institute for Applied Economic Research (Ipea) – a Brazilian think-tank linked to the government – is making a request for proposals for eight IDB consultants to contribute with chapters to a seminal book on Complex Systems applied to Public Policies. On one hand, the project aims at pushing forward the modeling frontier, its methodologies and applications for the case of Brazil. On the other hand, the project pursues actual improvement on the understanding of public policies’ mechanisms and effects, through complex systems’ tools and concepts.
The book encompasses five broad themes: (1) concepts and methods; (2) computational tools; (3) public policy phenomena as complex systems (specifically: society, economics, ecology and the cities); (4) applied examples in the world and its emergence in Brazil; and (5) possibilities of prognosis, scenarios and policy-effect analysis using complex systems tools.
The consultant is expected to deliver a proposed extended summary, a preliminary version to be discussed in a seminar in Brazil (July-September 2014) and the final version of the chapter.


http://www.ipea.gov.br/portal/index.php/?option=com_content&view=article&id=21745&Itemid=5


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Signals and Boundaries: Building Blocks for Complex Adaptive Systems: John H. Holland: 9780262525930: Amazon.com: Books

Signals and Boundaries: Building Blocks for Complex Adaptive Systems

~ John H. Holland (author) More about this product
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Signals and Boundaries: Building Blocks for Complex Adaptive Systems [John H. Holland] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Complex adaptive systems (cas), including ecosystems, governments, biological cells, and markets, are characterized by intricate hierarchical arrangements of boundaries and signals. In ecosystems
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Social networks for managers

Revision of Previous Show on SNA and Introduction to Tools The Language of Networks Introduction to Social Network Analysis/ Cases Tools for Analyzing social...

Via june holley
Liz Rykert's insight:

Thanks for this one June!

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june holley's curator insight, March 5, 8:20 AM

Lots in here about social network mapping and analysis.