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The unfolding and control of network cascades

  A characteristic property of networks is their ability to propagate
influences, such as infectious diseases, behavioral changes, and failures. An
especially important class of such contagious dynamics is that of cascading
processes. These processes include, for example, cascading failures in
infrastructure systems, extinctions cascades in ecological networks, and
information cascades in social systems. In this review, we discuss recent
progress and challenges associated with the modeling, prediction, detection,
and control of cascades in networks.

 

The Unfolding and Control of Network Cascades,
Adilson E. Motter and Yang Yang,
Physics Today, January 2017, page 32.
http://physicstoday.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/PT.3.3426


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50 Quotes to Spark a Culture of Innovation in 2017 – Innovation Excellence

50 Quotes to Spark a Culture of Innovation in 2017 – Innovation Excellence | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
An inspiring quote is a great tool for changing a mindset. I made a personal collection of 50 outstanding quotes on change and innovation. Use them to inspire others to start a culture of change, to think different and to prioritize change and innovation at the start of 2017.
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Love this list!

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3 Trends That Will Disrupt the Meetings and Events Industry in 2017

3 Trends That Will Disrupt the Meetings and Events Industry in 2017 | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

The primary shift in the meetings and events industry in 2017 is going to revolve around delivering business events that engage attendees in more multidisciplinary ways.

For the last five years, the industry has been focused on two trends impacting meeting design strategy above all else: the rise of event technology and the emergence of the Millennial generation. There was growing consensus in 2016, however, that it’s time for the meetings industry to move beyond its preoccupation with those themes.


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Rescooped by Liz Rykert from Self-organizing and Systems Mapping
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Kumu-Finding-Clarity-Using-interviews-to-listen-to-a-system.pdf

Kumu-Finding-Clarity-Using-interviews-to-listen-to-a-system.pdf | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

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Keith Hamon's curator insight, January 8, 3:38 PM
This is a useful guide to using interviews to map a complex organizational system.
Rescooped by Liz Rykert from networks and network weaving
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Using Networks for Social Change in a New Era

Using Networks for Social Change in a New Era | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
In order to thrive in this new era of uncertainty, nonprofit leaders must harness the power of networks in order to grow their ability to influence the future.

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CCL Hosts Cutting Edge Conference on Networks and Leadership

CCL Hosts Cutting Edge Conference on Networks and Leadership | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Phil Willburn describes the insights gained at the Center for Creative Leadership's 2014 Thought Forum on Network Leadership and Leadership Networks.
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Networks and the New Science of Sustainability

Networks and the New Science of Sustainability | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
“The goal is not so much to see that which no one has seen, but to see that which everyone else sees in a totally different way.” – Arthur Schopenhauer I just finished reading The…

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Hidden geometric correlations in real multiplex networks

Real networks often form interacting parts of larger and more complex systems. Examples can be found in different domains, ranging from the Internet to structural and functional brain networks. Here, we show that these multiplex systems are not random combinations of single network layers. Instead, they are organized in specific ways dictated by hidden geometric correlations between the layers. We find that these correlations are significant in different real multiplexes, and form a key framework for answering many important questions. Specifically, we show that these geometric correlations facilitate the definition and detection of multidimensional communities, which are sets of nodes that are simultaneously similar in multiple layers. They also enable accurate trans-layer link prediction, meaning that connections in one layer can be predicted by observing the hidden geometric space of another layer. And they allow efficient targeted navigation in the multilayer system using only local knowledge, outperforming navigation in the single layers only if the geometric correlations are sufficiently strong.

 

Hidden geometric correlations in real multiplex networks
Kaj-Kolja Kleineberg, Marián Boguñá, M. Ángeles Serrano & Fragkiskos Papadopoulos
Nature Physics 12, 1076–1081 (2016) doi:10.1038/nphys3812


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Is Your Company’s Culture Positioned to Drive Innovation?

Is Your Company’s Culture Positioned to Drive Innovation? | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Innovation continues to be a hot topic. The Boston Consulting Group’s 10th annual global survey of the state of innovation shows that 79 percent of respondents ranked it as the company’s top-most priority or a top-three priority—the highest percent since the survey began in 2005. Whether in business, non-profit, sports, or entertainment, most organizations are […]
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The future's in play

The future's in play | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Comment: Pat Kane is curating the Play theme of this year's FutureFest. Here he shares why play will be our dominant way of knowing, doing and creating in the 21st century
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Network Behaviors to Leverage Network Effects

Network Behaviors to Leverage Network Effects | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Think like a network, act like a node. At IISC, we continue to emphasize that networks, not organizations, are the unit of social change. Part of the reason for this is that networks at their best …
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How trees talk to each other

How trees talk to each other | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
"A forest is much more than what you see," says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery -- trees talk, often and over vast distances. Learn more about the harmonious yet complicated social lives of trees and prepare to see the natural world with new eyes.

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System Mapping

System Mapping | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
A guide to developing actor maps to describe connections within complex systems.
Liz Rykert's insight:
Great tool to support groups to do a systems map of key actors in a system
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Mapping the Themes, Impact, and Cohesion of Creativity Research over the Last 25 Years

Mapping the Themes, Impact, and Cohesion of Creativity Research over the Last 25 Years | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

 

This article describes the themes found in the past 25 years of creativity research. Computational methods and network analysis were used to map keyword theme development across ~1,400 documents and ~5,000 unique keywords from 1990 (the first year keywords are available in Web of Science) to 2015.

 

Mapping the Themes, Impact, and Cohesion of Creativity Research over the Last 25 Years
Rich Williams, Mark A. Runco & Eric Berlow
Creativity Research Journal.Volume 28, 2016 - Issue 4 Pages 385-394 | Published online: 14 Nov 2016


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How the new science of computational history is changing the study of the past

How the new science of computational history is changing the study of the past | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Applying network theory to medieval records suggests that historical events are governed by “laws of history,” just as nature is bound by the laws of physics.

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Our Top 50 Human Behavior Experts to Follow in 2017

Our Top 50 Human Behavior Experts to Follow in 2017 | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
A combined list with some of the most influential and revolutionary profiles in the industry with interesting facts, summary of their work and much more.
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Visual Analysis of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems: Chaos, Fractals, Self-Similarity and the Limits of Prediction

Visual Analysis of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems: Chaos, Fractals, Self-Similarity and the Limits of Prediction | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it

Nearly all nontrivial real-world systems are nonlinear dynamical systems. Chaos describes certain nonlinear dynamical systems that have a very sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Chaotic systems are always deterministic and may be very simple, yet they produce completely unpredictable and divergent behavior. Systems of nonlinear equations are difficult to solve analytically, and scientists have relied heavily on visual and qualitative approaches to discover and analyze the dynamics of nonlinearity. Indeed, few fields have drawn as heavily from visualization methods for their seminal innovations: from strange attractors, to bifurcation diagrams, to cobweb plots, to phase diagrams and embedding. Although the social sciences are increasingly studying these types of systems, seminal concepts remain murky or loosely adopted. This article has three aims. First, it argues for several visualization methods to critically analyze and understand the behavior of nonlinear dynamical systems. Second, it uses these visualizations to introduce the foundations of nonlinear dynamics, chaos, fractals, self-similarity and the limits of prediction. Finally, it presents Pynamical, an open-source Python package to easily visualize and explore nonlinear dynamical systems’ behavior.

 

Visual Analysis of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems: Chaos, Fractals, Self-Similarity and the Limits of Prediction
Geoff Boeing

Systems 2016, 4(4), 37; doi:10.3390/systems4040037


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Marcelo Errera's curator insight, December 3, 2016 12:02 PM
Though not directly related to Constructal Law, it s a very interesting tool to communicate studies in complexity.
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Network Leadership Roles 2.0

Network Leadership Roles 2.0 | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
“Network entrepreneurs are keenly aware that they are few among many working across the larger system, and in this way they embody a special type of … leader[ship].” – Jane …
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My Site

My Site | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
The Center for Ethical Leadership is a national nonprofit that cultivates leadership and change capacity that advances social change.  We support individual, institutional an
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Rescooped by Liz Rykert from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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(Hey, Teacher) Leave Those Kids Alone | #ModernEDU

(Hey, Teacher) Leave Those Kids Alone | #ModernEDU | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Alison Gopnik is the author of the New York Times best seller The Philosophical Baby, a regular contributor to The Wall Street Journal, and a pioneer in developmental psychology and understanding the way children learn. Gopnik’s new book, The Gardener and the Carpenter—which came out in August 2016—addresses the growing pressure on parents and teachers to ensure that children develop in one particular way.

That’s a losing strategy, insists Gopnik. Arguing passionately for a messier, less directed form of guidance for children, Gopnik summons evidence from decades of research that suggests that young kids are born learners—diverse, wildly unpredictable, easily distracted, but always processing information, cracking codes, and experimenting with new, innovative ideas that drive the species forward.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Creativity

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 29, 2016 7:27 PM
Alison Gopnik is the author of the New York Times best seller The Philosophical Baby, a regular contributor to The Wall Street Journal, and a pioneer in developmental psychology and understanding the way children learn. Gopnik’s new book, The Gardener and the Carpenter—which came out in August 2016—addresses the growing pressure on parents and teachers to ensure that children develop in one particular way.

That’s a losing strategy, insists Gopnik. Arguing passionately for a messier, less directed form of guidance for children, Gopnik summons evidence from decades of research that suggests that young kids are born learners—diverse, wildly unpredictable, easily distracted, but always processing information, cracking codes, and experimenting with new, innovative ideas that drive the species forward.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Creativity

 

OneydaAyala's curator insight, October 30, 2016 6:57 PM
This article is actually an interview of Alison Gobnik the author whom wrote the New York Times best seller The Philosophical Baby. In the interview, the reporter for Edutopia (an educational foundation) discussed some matters that were found in Gobnik's book. The first topic discussed was that of parent and teacher roles. According to Gobnik who has done 15 years worth of research on biological evolution and psychological development, children should be exposed to a rich environment and be given the liberty to explore for themselves. She addresses the fact that children, especially young ones, are far much better learners than we can be teachers. She addresses the importance of family roles in early childhood. Children should not be limited to just their parents and school material but rather they should be in a community of learning. Extended family aides in the learning and interaction of children. It is at a young age that they learn to observe others and replicate their observations. However, both educators and parents have fallen into the pressure of traditional schooling because they seek to teach children a set of specific skills that they hope will aide in them in their future success. The author makes special reference to the 19th century when schools taught a narrow array of skills to fit the industrial age. Other questions asked by the reporter include: the role of play, the role of technology, and the spike of ADHD diagnosed in children. 
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Research and Evaluation in the Nonprofit Sector: Implications for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

Research and Evaluation in the Nonprofit Sector: Implications for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
In this important article from NPQ’s EDI series, two researchers raise important questions every nonprofit and philanthropy should consider in the way nonprofits design research and use data. Let’s talk about it!
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Learn from the Best: Google’s Nine Principles of Innovation – Innovation Excellence

The Innovation Excellence community is home to innovation articles, webinars, videos, training and education - powering successful growth in the innovation management profession.
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The Community Cure for Health Care (SSIR)

The Community Cure for Health Care (SSIR) | Random Overlaps | Scoop.it
Large health care systems are beginning to invest core operating dollars in connecting their patients to community resources, in service of the ultimate solution to better costs and outcomes: keeping patients healthy.
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