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129 inmates escape Mexican prison near U.S. border - CNN.com

129 inmates escape Mexican prison near U.S. border - CNN.com | Random Geography | Scoop.it

Authorities in northern Mexico detained a prison director and two other officials after 129 inmates escaped from the facility through a tunnel, officials said.

 

The Border is the harshest place in Mexico and the growing prison population is due to the fight against organized crime. Hoever, with the escapes from prison how can the Mexican government really control the illegal activity in their country. They are doing all they can to control what is happening.  

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How to Steer Clear of India's Strict Internet Laws

How to Steer Clear of India's Strict Internet Laws | Random Geography | Scoop.it

There is one simple, but drastic, solution, experts say.

 

It is hard to think that a person can be arrested for a post on facebook. It is happening in India because they do not have the same rights as Americans. This is like Eygpt shuting off the internet to stop the people from rebelling.  

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Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers

Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers | Random Geography | Scoop.it
Many companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila to take advantage of workers who speak lightly accented English and are familiar with American culture.

 

The geography of globalization is epitomized by relentless change and marked by continual turnover.  Cultural and economic factors play significant roles in creating potential advantages for receiving outsourced jobs (whether that is beneficially long-term is another discussion). 

 

People relate the best with people that speak their own language so many compnaies are finding places that best fit. America is going toward the Philippines becuase they were a former American colony.


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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 1:40 AM

I liked this article simply because I could relate it to my own personal experiences speaking with someone at a call center.  I guess it is kind of interesting that the Phillippines has overtaken India in terms of number of call centers.  What was reallly interesting though was how familiar those at the call centers were of Americans. 

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:27 PM

Companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila because there the workers speak a lightly accented English and are more familiar with American culture then they are over in India. This shows the maturation of the outsourcing buisness and shows the preference for American English.  

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 12:41 PM

The fact that so many Filipinos speak English is an important one to understand. This brings jobs to the Philippines, but at the expense of local culture. High income and social standing in the Philippines is often correlated with English, as many of the high-ranking citizens attend universities in the United States and return with degrees, and in turn teach their children English. This marginalizes their own language in a way, and is something to keep aware of, as it's one thing that the United States does not face in many areas, that most other countries around the world do.  

 

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Continental Divides in North Dakota and North America

Continental Divides in North Dakota and North America | Random Geography | Scoop.it
This is an article about continental divides...
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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

Wow! A fast speaking vidoe but it answers many questions in just 5 mins. The United Kingdom, Great Britian and England which is which is a very important question.


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Random Geography | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

 

America is a country that prohobots discrimination no matter what so it is different to read about a country that so openly restricts a group of people. It is out of fear that the Muslims are going to try and take control in Europe and fear is a big motivator. The muslim people have to choose between their religion or being able to live life in Europe. It must be such a hard decision for the young girls that have to choose between religion or an education.


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Shayna and Kayla's curator insight, February 6, 12:29 PM

This represents the religion section because Europe is restricting islamic symbols causing controversy .

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.

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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | Random Geography | Scoop.it

"The name of the country Pakistan has a fascinating history - it is essentially an acronym!  Prior to 1947, the country now known as Pakistan was a British colony. In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to the region under a new name, Pakistan. The name had been developed by a group of students at Cambridge University who issued a pamphlet in 1933 called Now or Never."

 

The name really does work because with such a diverse popultion it is hard to find a name. At least this was everyone is represented.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:27 PM

When you take in the way that the British Empire controlled many colonies and tried to spread their culture to such diverse regions, it is no suprise that Pakistan was named essentially by a game of Scrabble.  I suppose the naming is somewhat creative and certainly unique compared to how other countries get their names, yet just picturing a group of colleagues naming a country is strange.  Though the U.K. did grant them independance, how independant were they really if they weren't even given the right to name their own land.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 11, 12:55 PM

(South Asia topic 5)

The name "Pakistan" can be thought of as more of a "Mexicali" or "Calexico" than an "Afghanistan" or "Turkmenistan." In other words, it is an acronym, which I was surprised to learn. Though is can also be translated as "land of the Paks", there is no specific group by that name. Relating back to a previous Scoop, this shows the importance of validation and reasoning, as opposed to 'blind belief.'

I think the use of an acronym for the new nation's name (a toponym) was a very intuitive option to choose; no ethnic group could complain that their name didn't make it into the name of their nation while others' did. This seems to be a form of equal representation.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 1:28 AM

This article is very interesting as it explains the origin of the name Pakistan. Like many people I assumed that the name had to do with some old ethnic group but in reality its something of an acronym. Interestingly enough Pakistan is incredibly diverse and really only held together by the common Islamic religion. Names which are acronyms are more common place in government plans or cheesy infomercial products rather than the names of countries.     

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Palestinian Loss of Land

Palestinian Loss of Land...

Palestine and Israel have been at war for years and this vidoes really shows why Palestinians are still unhappy. They started with so much land and now their world does not even show up on any maps. Any one would be extremely unhappy if this was happening to them.


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 21, 2013 11:44 PM

Interesting that they showed a map of 1886.  Palestine didn't exits in 1886 either, it was under control of the Ottoman Empire and the Ottoman Turks.  Egypy controlled this area at one time, around 3000BC, Then there was a Kingdom of Israle around 1050 BC, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Macedonains, Romans, Byzantines, Sassanids, Muslims of the Caliphates, Seljuks, Europeans during the Crusades, Saladin, Ottomans, Europeans again after WW I, then the state of Israel after the end of WW 2 all controlled this area.  This area has been under control of many different rulers, empires and cultures.  I know I must have missed some.  It is not as simple as Palestininians lossing land, the issue goes wat back before anyone today cares ot even remember.  If Im right there was never a state called Palestine under modern times, but there was a Kingdom of Israel.  I know that is not a justification for the right to exist or not exits, but it shows a history of a nation of Israel.  If the Palestinian people want a state, why don't they recognize that Israel has the same right?  One that might be grounded in history more than theirs.  I do believe the Palestinians have the right to  state, but they need to recognize that Israel has the same right that they want. 

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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Random Geography | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Birth rate is increasing and so is the expected life of people in Africa. With these two things on the rise the popultaion is growing becuase their culture tells them to keep having children. Times are changing but it is hard for the culture and people to change with. However, for Africa if it does not change they will be in serious trouble.


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

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Russia's Economy is Still Growing Faster than Every EU Country - Forbes

Russia's Economy is Still Growing Faster than Every EU Country - Forbes | Random Geography | Scoop.it

Russia is a positive outlier: its economy is growing more quickly than all of the new EU members.

 

After all the trouble that Russia has been through over the years for once things are looking up for them. The country is not out of the woods yet but with the improvements things could really cange for the better.

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Brazil prisoners ride bikes toward prison reform

Brazil prisoners ride bikes toward prison reform | Random Geography | Scoop.it

SANTA RITA DO SAPUCAI, Brazil - Muscular young men in red jumpsuits hunch over a set of matching stationary bicycles, sweating and panting. A few more wait to take over when the first group is...

 

Using the inmates to generate electricity in exchange for time off their sentence. Brazil is known for the horrible prison conditions, with this program the behavior has changed. The inmates are working hard to be allowed into this program to get time off. The program has only been running for a short time but the outcome has been so good it is being picked up in other parts of the country.

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129 inmates escape Mexican prison near U.S. border - CNN.com

129 inmates escape Mexican prison near U.S. border - CNN.com | Random Geography | Scoop.it

Authorities in northern Mexico detained a prison director and two other officials after 129 inmates escaped from the facility through a tunnel, officials said.

 

The Border is the harshest place in Mexico and the growing prison population is due to the fight against organized crime. Hoever, with the escapes from prison how can the Mexican government really control the illegal activity in their country. They are doing all they can to control what is happening.  

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Don't be nosy about Fast and Furious

Don't be nosy about Fast and Furious | Random Geography | Scoop.it

We are a nosy country.Though to be fair, it's not entirely our fault. Between the 24/7 news cycle, social media and reality TV, we have been spoon fed other people's private business for so long we...

 

The government tends to keep things to from the American public. Fast and Furious is the cover up of the selling of guns for hostages and then supporting an illegal operation against communism.  

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China Blocks Web Access to Times

China Blocks Web Access to Times | Random Geography | Scoop.it

The Chinese government began blocking access to The Times after publication of an article describing the wealth accumulated by relatives of Prime Minister Wen Jiabao.

 

Another article about a country resricting access to something that Americans use and say what they wish everyday.  

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Picturing Everyday Life in Africa

Picturing Everyday Life in Africa | Random Geography | Scoop.it

Too often the subjects of images of Africa seem to be reduced to symbols - viewers do not encounter them as fully rounded human beings, rarely seeing journalistic images of the middle class, artists or the cultural heritage of African countries.

 

Africa may not be as developed as America but the people live for the same reasons we do. Looking at these pictures of the middle class may not be the best representation of the majorities life but it shows another side to a place everyone believes to be horrible to live in. 

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Perpetual Ocean by NASA

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio — the same team that recently brought us an animation of the moon as it will appear from Earth for each hour of 2012 — has also released a stunning video called “Perpetual Ocean,” a time lapse of the world’s ocean currents as calculated by the ECCO2 computational model.

 

The ocean is a large part of Earth. The currents change over time and when they do the climate of the area around it can change as well. The ocean plays a larger role than people think in the way we live.

 


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Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:10 PM

This video is pretty awesome! I love how it shows the different ways that the currents move around the continents and in mid ocean. How are we not to expect for natural phenomenoms to be unpredictable when our oceansa re the same. i would have never expected to see so many idfferent flows and currents but they do exist. It gives you a look into how are planet works and also gives you a chilling thought of how easily a ship would get lost in deep ocean waters. - M. Carvajal

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 4:39 PM

This is an amazing video. The technology we have at our disposable is truly remarkable and we have reached a point where mapping all the currents of the ocean can be done and put up on youtube. This information is available to people who otherwise would have no idea how to interpret ocean currents.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 10:18 AM

This video shows just how technology is advancing, being able to show how the world's water currents move and, especially, showing how different our bodies of water are. I always thought the currents were somehow connected, but now I see that many move in their own way.

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Taming the City of God

Taming the City of God | Random Geography | Scoop.it
Years of hatred and mistrust are thawing in some of Rio's most violent slums.

 

Rio is hosting the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Oyllympic Games and to make sure that they are ready to do so, they are making some improvements. Even though the reason seems superficial, it is a great idea and they are doing some great things. The people in Rio do not trust the police and they fear the traffrickers but the police are doing whatever they can to change that. Setting up programs for the children and truly protecting the people, and keeping in mind that it will not change over night.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2:00 PM

This compelling video depicts some of the challenges that the police in Rio de Janeiro face in trying to bring more effective governance into some of the more poverty-stricken, drug-riddled neighborhoods in the city.  This slums, known as favelas, are receiving increased attention as Rio is hosting the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 30, 9:08 AM

(South America topic 7)

The details pertaining to how Rio's police force has been regaining control in favelas surprised me, but in a positive way. For example, having officers work and volunteer with children is a great idea to stop the generation chain of fearing the police as the enemy. I believe the message that this communicates is that the police are human too, sharing many of the same aspirations as those who they serve. It's unfortunate that this ramping-up in force comes mainly because of the approaching Olympics, but at least it is still a step in the right direction.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 12:42 PM

This video shows the tense relationship between the favales and the government of Brazil. I can't help but notice how people in the favales are being treated as lesser citizens that are not part of the collective identity of Brazil. As these big sporting events draw near, the government is more concerned with hiding or eliminating the systemic inequalities that are occurring in the favales. If I lived in these areas I would find it hard not to see the government as an enemy.

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Iceland's Volcanic Rivers

Iceland's Volcanic Rivers | Random Geography | Scoop.it
Time and time again, we're reminded of nature's beauty. It's hard to believe, but these photos of real landscapes, not abstract paintings.

 

This is an amazing set of photos. The photos almost don't seem real because it is something that most people have never seen before. The beauty of iceland is breathtaking.


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:30 AM

This is a picture of the volcanic ash that is under Iceland's Mid-Attlantic Ridge. This shows us that nature by itself can create beauty. It is also fascinating to see because you would never think Iceland would still have the presence of volcanic ash due to it's climate.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 11:20 AM

Iceland is one of my favorite countries, and the place I most want to visit and would most likely move to if I had to leave the United States. The landscape is insanely beautiful and the population is extremely small, something I enjoy as I dislike cities and a high population density. Even the capital of Iceland looks akin to a relatively average fishing town in the Northern US or Canada, and the entire country has less people in it than any given state in the US.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2:57 PM

Nature has an incredible way at depicting and displaying its true beauty to the rest of the world. These images captured by photographer Andre Ermolaev looks like something that would be captured at a museum opening displaying some remarkable pieces of abstract work. Though this may not be the case, it gives you the desire to want to travel and experience this for yourself.

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal | Random Geography | Scoop.it
Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.

 

It is amazing how interconnected politics, enviroment, and social aspects of the world are. In this video we see how the government built the paper mill. The town was built around it which created the society that relayed on the paper mill. Then the mill is possioning the lake, so people are beinging to complain. It is a huge never ending circle.

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 2:43 PM

The story of this particular mono-town is very tough to "pick sides".  The factory undoubtedly pollutes the air and land like most other industrial areas, but being so close to Lake Baikal gives environmentalists a stronger reason to complain.  The lake is considered one of the purest and most unique in the world, yet the paper mill located on its banks raise controversy.  This is where the locals and workers are stuck between a rock and hard place.  Located in Siberia, such a vast and open region with little settlements compared to the western part of the country reminds the people living there that their resources are limited.  Closing down the factory would almost eliminate income and economy for the mono-town.  This is where the fine line is drawn; the workers surely aren't happy about the pollution and environmental hazards that go along with keeping the mill open, but at the same time the people could wither away if it wasn't up and running.

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 1:42 AM

THough the Soviet Union has been gone since the early 90s, it's hold on Russia is still creating problems. The creations of monotowns were already flawed. But to have this one monotown on Lake Baikal has gained the attention of enviromentalists. All odds are against that monotown. Without it's paper factory they have no jobs and no need for the town. It is a fight between enviromental geography and human geography in this area of the world. These people are stuck in a time where even the Soviet Union looked a little better than the constant wondering of your finacial stability in an up and coming capitalist nation.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 12:05 PM

The Soviet Union scattered "monotowns" around their territory; these monotowns consist of a job-creating industrial institutions like factories which then allow the formation of towns around them.  They are located all around the former Soviet Union and are very isolated.  After the collapse of the Soviet Union, these towns continued to run due to the privatization of the industrial center.  Today, Russia's Lake Baikal, which is the deepest lake in the world and contains 20 percent of the Earth's fresh water, is home to one of these monotowns.  This particular town's economy is based on their paper mill which uses and deposits tons of chemicals.  Environmentalists are very concerned for the future of the lake while the citizens are only concerned with feeding their families and this is creating social unrest.  Due to the isolation and distance from Moscow, people cannot just pick up and leave.  Also, working with "cleaner" alternatives is way out of this town's budget.  Today, many citizens in these monotowns miss the support that the Soviet Union offered and people are literally stuck in a place where their only income is dirty.

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Slideshare: Middle east flags

The flags of the middle east all have a similiar design. In either color or design of the logo. Similiar to the European flags becuase they are so close to each other and share so much culture and religion. The closer the countries are the more the flags seem to resemble each other. Even the change that Iraq made in thier flag, they may have changed the colors but the logo in the middle is very similiar to other countries.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:11 PM

Many of these countries share similar backgrounds and cultures, as well as flags which is seen above.  The color patterns show red, black,  white, and green on almost every flag except Israel's which is blue and white.  It shows that most of the countries within the region are all linked somehow whether it be through language, identity, or other reasons, though there is still room for conflict and change as time passes.  After looking at flags from other countries such as Iraq and Iran, the graphics on them change, sometimes reflecting government changes.  It is sometimes difficult to remember and notice so many flags, yet some of these flags have changed within the last 2 to 3 decades to accompany the change of government.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:06 PM

This goes to show how a flag is supposed to represent the people who live in their country. And the flag of Israel really does stick out like a sore thumb. We have the crescent moon, the typical Arabic colors of green, red, black, and white, and the blue and white really doesn't have much to do with the history of the people who live in Israel, only the new Jewish community who live there, but not the Palestinians. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 11:36 AM

Representation of middle eastern flags,

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Envoy talks possible cease-fire with Syrian foreign minister - CNN.com

Envoy talks possible cease-fire with Syrian foreign minister - CNN.com | Random Geography | Scoop.it

These vidoes and article show how the fight between the rebels and the government are hurting the people more than each other. The pictures of people that are just trying to live life around the fighting. The mass grave found with women and children among over 80 people dead. Cease-fire is not what either side really wants but it is what is best for the people.

Looking at all the headlining articles from CNN about the middle east are horrible stories. No wonder people have such low regard about the Middle East because war makes better news then cooperation.

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AIDS/HIV

AIDS/HIV | Random Geography | Scoop.it

AIDS is a global issue, but clearly this impacts Sub-Saharan Africa far more than any other region. 

 

Tags: Africa, medical, infographic, development.

 

Aids and HIV are everywhere but not all places seem to suffer the same. In America there is a very small percent living with the Aids or HIV. However, in Africa all the the top 15 countries for percentage living with Aids can be found. What is the differnce from the Americas and Europe to Africa? Why if everyone has the rick of infection does this dieses seem to affect Africa so much?


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 11, 2:59 PM

If AIDS is obviously a bigger problem in SUb-Saharan Africa i would hope that, that is where we would send the most help and further educate people about safe sex and how to prevent from spreading AIDS.

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Europe: Human Geography

Europe: Human Geography | Random Geography | Scoop.it

The political,enviromental, and cultural Geography of Europe. With the history of why it is the way it is in todays world. " Europe’s early political history can be traced back to ancient Greece and Rome, both of which profoundly affected how Western civilizations govern their territories and citizens."

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KaitlynandSydney's curator insight, February 6, 12:46 PM

This map/article goes under European area/geography because it is a detailed map of Europe with detailed descriptions of the geographical features

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 1:06 PM

geography: shows the different regions of Europe 

Gabby and Kamri's curator insight, February 7, 11:21 PM

We chose this article for geography, because it discusses Europe's formation, and why they are the way they are. From the ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome, to Hitler's domination, this article covers all the events in history, that shaped Europe into the way it is today.

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Militarization of Central America and the Caribbean: The U.S. Military Moves Into Costa Rica | Global Research

Militarization of Central America and the Caribbean: The U.S. Military Moves Into Costa Rica | Global Research | Random Geography | Scoop.it

Costa Rica has approved America's plan to move troops, helicopters and warships into their country. This is all being done under the pretense of the war on drugs. However, as history has shown once America goes into a country they seldom back out. It is there way to get their foot in the door to secure the countries around them.

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Grassley letter to Holder demands more Fast and Furious answers

The House may have voted contempt charges against Attorney General Eric Holder, but that has not ended the investigation into who at the Justice Department knew about Operation Fast and Furious --..

 

The Government does not even know the whole story of what happened with the guns. It is hard for Americans to be in the dark about things but in a case were people invilved don't even know the whole story.

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