Random Ephemera
Follow
Find
5.1K views | +1 today
Random Ephemera
Cool, random finds that stand alone in their coolness
Curated by Daniel House
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Charles Ponstingl: amazing wood-carver who recreated the comics

Charles Ponstingl: amazing wood-carver who recreated the comics | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it
Zack sez, "Mel Birnkant, creator of the Outer Space Men and major Disney collector, has a section on his website paying tribute to his friend Charles Ponstingl, who did amazing, elaborate wood carvings based on classic comic strips.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Zoomable Map Shows Every Person in U.S. and Canada

Zoomable Map Shows Every Person in U.S. and Canada | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Brandon Martin-Anderson decided he wanted to see what the U.S. and Canada look like if every person were put on the map. Literally. No state or city borders, no lines for roads or highways, no coloration based on political or religious views. Just one dot per person, in the spot where they were counted for the population census. What would human settlement patterns look like?

 

Turns out, it looks like this. A total of 341,817,095 dots, each representing an individual person counted in the 2010 (U.S.) and 2011 (Canada) censuses, and each placed in the location where they were reported living by the census counters.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

The Beatles of Comedy

The Beatles of Comedy | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Monty Python's genius was to respect nothing.


In 1968, a group of young English comedians made a TV special called How to Irritate People. Pitched for the U.S. market, the show was meant to get Americans excited about a new wave of British comedy. It failed in that aim, but one of its sketches retains high interest for the archaeologist of humor. Written by a couple of Cambridge graduates named John Cleese and Graham Chapman, the sketch is set in the workshop of a shady car salesman. A disgruntled customer, played by Chapman, returns his new car and registers a few complaints: The gear lever is loose. The brakes don’t work. Before the sketch is over, the vehicle’s doors have fallen off.

 

But the dodgy salesman—played by a promising comedian named Michael Palin—has an answer for everything. “You must expect teething troubles in these new models,” he says. In real life, Palin had been sold a defective car himself, and he had entertained Cleese with impersonations of his stonewalling dealer. The resulting sketch, which can be dug up on YouTube, took a few comic liberties with Palin’s real-life experiences—a few, but not enough. Like a lot of apprentice work, it’s too respectful of convention and literal truth to strike a distinctive note.

 

A year or so later, the BBC offered Cleese his own series. He was interested, but he didn’t want to be the show’s star. He preferred to surround himself with a team of Britain’s cleverest young writer-performers...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Color as Data: Visualizing Color Composition

Color as Data: Visualizing Color Composition | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Abstracting glossy magazines, or what pie charts have to do with the Mona Lisa.

We love data visualization and color. So what happens when you apply the former to the latter, visualizing color composition like you would any data set? Today, we look at three projects that take the color composition of familiar cultural artifacts and break it down visually.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Cambodia Hyperlapse - Moving Timelapse

A movie I made to stretch my creative and technical abilities - Ive grown tired of the standard timelapse and wanted to help push the genre in a more exciting direction.


Shot on a 7d, I made this on weekends and holidays over the timespan of 6 weeks and edited most of each of the timelapses as I went to avoid an extreme backlog. I used a simple tripod and $8 intervalometer for most of the shots - no expensive equipment was used like dollies or steadicams.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

James Bond 007 Cars Evolution

James Bond 007 Cars Evolution | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Everyone has a favorite Bond - and a favorite Bond girl - but what's your favorite Bond car? This interactive guide from Evans Halshaw traces the entertaining evolution of 007's cars.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Fold a Paper R2-D2 and Other Awesome Star Wars Origami

Fold a Paper R2-D2 and Other Awesome Star Wars Origami | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Martin Hunt was studying math at Southampton University when he decided to start designing origami Star Wars vessels. He became obsessed with the X-wing, and then quickly moved on to other ships and droids — lots of others.

 

"The rules of what you can do with a single square of paper are fixed," he says. "It's not just a case of putting brush to paper and letting your imagination run riot."

 

Hunt is taking his creations to the wider world. In October, he exhibited some large-scale versions at the London MCM Expo and Comic Con, and he's seeking a publisher for a book. But he's sharing some of his designs already, through his website and on YouTube. He's not the only one out there doing it — Chris Alexander of starwarsorigami.com just released a book — but Hunt's designs veer toward the more complicated and intricate. He recommends them for intermediate to advanced origami artists, but that didn't stop us from trying our inept hands at the Naboo Starfighter.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Amazing Tattoos Inspired by Children’s Books

Amazing Tattoos Inspired by Children’s Books | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Since we love a good story, we couldn’t tear our eyes away from this amazing ink inspired by Richard Adams’ Watership Down, featured on Neatorama. The emotional, allegorical tale has truly touched many readers. We’ve explored tattoos honoring the best of children’s cinema before, and the time seemed ripe to seek out body art that gives a nod to the world of children’s literature. Books for young readers are filled with incredible illustrations and memorable lines, and these devotees have celebrated some of the most famous titles in clever, nerdy, intimate, and permanent ways. Click through our gallery of amazing tattoos that reference the wondrous stories and characters you’ve loved since you were a kid.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Silencing the Dead: The Decline of Spiritualism

Silencing the Dead: The Decline of Spiritualism | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, spiritualism -- a belief that the spirits of the dead can communicate with the living -- was all the rage. Little was trendier than holding a séance led by a medium, who would mediate between the living and the dead. The medium not only delivered messages from the dearly departed, but also demonstrated the presence of spirits in the room by levitating objects, ringing bells, and producing a substance from their body known as ectoplasm.

 

Engaging as the tricks were, mediums were often shown to be frauds. "Exposures are of frequent occurrence, many of them highly sensational in character," wrote The New York Times in a November 21, 1909 article titled "Notable Charlatans Exposed In The Past: A Weird History That Leaves Spiritualism Undaunted." As it notes, "Slate writing, spirit pictures, table tipping, rapping, and other features of Spiritualism have been exposed time and again. The exposures mount into the hundreds."

 

Mediums often asked spirits to demonstrate their power by levitating or moving a table.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

The World’s First 3D-Printed Guitar

The World’s First 3D-Printed Guitar | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Scott Summit does unusual things on his vacations. For instance, he just spent a week up in the mountains, taking in the majestic scenery and all that, but also sitting at his laptop creating a 3D model of his ideal guitar. Then he sent the computer design to 3D Systems (DDD), which used its massive 3D printers to transform the graphic model into an actual acoustic instrument that Summit can play.

 

As far as anyone seems to know, this is the first 3D-printed guitar on the planet, and it raises all kinds musical possibilities.

 

Summit describes this version as a rough draft. He wants to start experimenting with more radical designs to see how they change the sound. Somewhere down the road he figures people will be able to use software to pick out what sort of treble, bass, or sustain they desire and then print a guitar to match those qualities.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Daniel House from cool stuff from research
Scoop.it!

Hundreds of Fans Collectively Remade Star Wars

Hundreds of Fans Collectively Remade Star Wars | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Forget gravity. Forget even irony. The universe knows no greater force, as it were, than the collective enthusiasm of Star Wars fans. 35 years after the first of them came out, the films’ power to inspire remains unsettlingly immediate and widespread. Or at least that goes for the original trilogy of Star Wars movies, the first of which, A New Hope, underwent a popular fan-made remake in 2009. The result, Star Wars Uncut, didn’t come as the project of a single enterprising aficionado plopping himself into the George Lucas seat, but as a fully “crowd-sourced” motion picture assembled out of fifteen-second clips shot by contributors called to action by one Casey Pugh. The hypnotic result, whose final cut first screened earlier this year and which you can watch above, offers Star Wars as patchwork quilt, the construction of its squares ranging from deliberately lo-fi (not to mention non-deliberately lo-fi) to surprisingly credible.

 


Via cafonso, Amy Cross
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Visions of a Blind Photographer

Visions of a Blind Photographer | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Sometimes when she’s taking pictures, Sonia Soberats forgets she cannot see.

 

Until 1986, Ms. Soberats was like many single immigrant mothers — living in Queens, working two jobs and watching her two children grow into flourishing adults. Life began to crumble, though, when ovarian cancer was diagnosed for her only daughter. Two years later, the family received more bad news: her only son had Hodgkin’s disease. He died in 1991, and three years later, so did Ms. Soberats’s daughter.

 

In between those deaths, Ms. Soberats, who had a history of glaucoma, lost her eyesight. First the right eye went dark, then about six months later, the left.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Broken Skateboards Become Stunning Wooden Sculptures

Broken Skateboards Become Stunning Wooden Sculptures | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Self-taught sculpture artist Haroshi uses the discarded leftovers of broken skateboards to create striking wooden creations.

 

The 35-year-old Tokyo resident, who prefers to not use his full name, began skating at age 15 in Kanagawa, amassing a growing stack of broken decks and parts. Ten years later, his collection overflowing, a friend suggested he find a way to do something with them. Cutting into one of the decks with a saw, he noticed an interesting pattern of stripes from its laminated layers of wood, and got to work on his first creation, a wooden bangle-style bracelet.

 

Since then, Haroshi’s sculptures have used the imagery of skateboard culture as inspiration for many of his pieces, utilizing multi-colored skateboard ply in both stacked layers and mosaic patterns. The output ranges from skateboarding cats to Airwalk sneakers. And, of course, skulls and demons.

 

“I believe there have been over 40,” Haroshi responds when asked how many pieces he’s made. “My process is very time consuming. Essentially, I assemble the decks into stacks, glue them together and cut into pieces. I use a sander, chisels and Japanese carving instruments with ultra-fine blades. Sometimes I apply different types of laminate to the wood to give them different finishes (depending on the subject).” And in some of his new pieces, he’s begun incorporating clear epoxy resin.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Making Music out of Rubbish

Making Music out of Rubbish | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

If there’s one thing us humans can do really well, it’s waste. We sure know how to waste, we even build monuments to our wasting prowess – huge, barren stretches of land heaped with nothing but tons upon tons of rubbish, running on mile after rotting mile. As if our crowded landfills weren’t proof enough of our vast capacity to waste, a recent report suggests that half the food grown in the whole wide world is wasted! If that doesn’t spark even the tiniest pang of guilt, you’re probably dead inside.

 

There’s hope, however, and it’s coming from the banks of Paraguay River in South America. Situated along the river’s edge lies a huge landfill – where a staggering 1,500 tons of waste are dumped each day – and on top of this landfill sits a slum, Cateura. Its residents make their living out of the rubbish, not only recycling, sorting and selling on the waste for small amounts of money, but turning them into tools and implements they’re able to use in their everyday lives for minimum expense.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

An Illustrated Talk With Maurice Sendak (Drawings by Christoph Niemann)

Children’s book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak passed away in 2012. His last interview, with NPR’s Terry Gross, will make your heart grow two sizes.

 

Artist Christoph Niemann was so touched by the interview, he illustrated the last five minutes in this touching animation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

These photographs of nude dancers are absolutely stunning

These photographs of nude dancers are absolutely stunning | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it
Despite appearances, these are not long exposure photographs. Long exposure shots of risqué subjects — like this one of two people having sex —
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

James Bond 007 Complete Opening Credit Sequences (Including Skyfall)

Complete compilation of the title sequences from James Bond´s films.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

They Cracked This 250-Year-Old Code, and Found a Secret Society Inside

They Cracked This 250-Year-Old Code, and Found a Secret Society Inside | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

For more than 260 years, the contents of that page—and the details of this ritual—remained a secret. They were hidden in a coded manuscript, one of thousands produced by secret societies in the 18th and 19th centuries. At the peak of their power, these clandestine organizations, most notably the Freemasons, had hundreds of thousands of adherents, from colonial New York to imperial St. Petersburg. Dismissed today as fodder for conspiracy theorists and History Channel specials, they once served an important purpose: Their lodges were safe houses where freethinkers could explore everything from the laws of physics to the rights of man to the nature of God, all hidden from the oppressive, authoritarian eyes of church and state. But largely because they were so secretive, little is known about most of these organizations. Membership in all but the biggest died out over a century ago, and many of their encrypted texts have remained uncracked, dismissed by historians as impenetrable novelties.

 

It was actually an accident that brought to light the symbolic “sight-restoring” ritual. The decoding effort started as a sort of game between two friends that eventually engulfed a team of experts in disciplines ranging from machine translation to intellectual history. Its significance goes far beyond the contents of a single cipher. Hidden within coded manuscripts like these is a secret history of how esoteric, often radical notions of science, politics, and religion spread underground. At least that’s what experts believe. The only way to know for sure is to break the codes.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

The Top 20 Data Visualization Tools

The Top 20 Data Visualization Tools | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

One of the most common questions I get asked is how to get started with data visualizations. Beyond following blogs, you need to practice – and to practice, you need to understand the tools available. In this article, I want to introduce you to 20 different tools for creating visualizations: from simple charts to complex graphs, maps and infographics. Almost everything here is available for free, and some you have probably installed already.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Every Page of Moby-Dick, Illustrated

Every Page of Moby-Dick, Illustrated | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Since 2009, former high school English teacher and self-taught artist Matt Kish has been drawing every page of the 552-page Signet Classics paperback edition of Herman Melville’s iconic Moby-Dick, methodically producing one gorgeous, obsessive drawing per day for 552 days using pages from discarded books and a variety of drawing tools, from ballpoint pen to crayon to ink and watercolor. Now, thanks to Tin House Books, Kish’s ingenious project joins our running list of blogs so good they became books: Moby-Dick in Pictures: One Drawing for Every Page gathers his magnificent lo-fi drawings in a 600-page visual masterpiece of bold, breathtaking full-page illustrations that captivate eye, heart, and mind, inviting you to rediscover the Melville classic in entirely new ways.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Every year for nearly four decades, Nikon has received hundreds of entries in its Small World microscope photography contest. Every year, the images are more amazing, and this year's winners -- selected from nearly 2,000 submissions -- are undoubtedly the best yet.

 

Super-close-ups of garlic, snail fossils, stinging nettle, bat embryos, bone cancer and a ladybug are among the top images this year. The first place winner (above) shows the blood-brain barrier in a living zebrafish embryo, which Nikon believes is the first image ever to show the formation of this barrier in a live animal.

 

“We used fluorescent proteins to look at brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time,” the winners, Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, in Memphis, said in a press release. “We took a 3-dimensional snapshot under a confocal microscope. Then, we stacked the images and compressed them into one – pseudo coloring them in rainbow to illustrate depth.”

 

Here are the top 20 photomicrographs from the 38th Nikon Small World competition, selected for their originality, informational content, and visual impact by a panel of scientists, journalists and optical imaging experts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

LED at 50: An Illuminating History by the Light's Inventor

LED at 50: An Illuminating History by the Light's Inventor | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

The light-emitting diode has brightened our lives for half a century - from lighting up the city streets at night, to decorating Christmas trees each December.

 

The LED started life in October 1962, as a single red illumination in a General Electric research lab in New York state.

 

Now - as one of the world's biggest retailers, Ikea, announces that by 2016 the only lighting products it will sell will be LED-based ones - Prof Nick Holonyak Jr from the University of Illinois, takes a look back at how it all began with his invention of the first practical visible-spectrum light-emitting diode.

 

CLICk to watch the video!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Bio-Sensing Art in the 1970s

Bio-Sensing Art in the 1970s | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

In 1970, I began actively working with new portable video systems, and with Woody and Steina Vasulka (Kitchen founders, 1971), explored the interface between various analogue audio and video synthesis systems; not to make programs, but rather to play in the realms of electronic signals, feedback and noise. I also met Peter Crown, Ph.D., physiological psychiatrist, and together we built simple EEG biofeedback systems, which we used as interface with audio/video synthesizers, and we had weekly evening presentations at the Kitchen. Our tools and abilities were limited.

 

In the mid-70’s I settled in the San Francisco Bay Area, in large part to attempt collaborative art-science work with NASA Ames Research Center. A number of creative projects resulted from the ‘informal’ collaboration among artists and scientists/technologists through 1981, beginning with use of multi-channel bio-telemetry devices and remote sensing systems with dancers (EMG muscle monitoring); wind-tunnel and multi-spectral imaging (thermography, holographic interferometry and schlierren) experiments; CTS satellite communication/performance projects; and gravitational simulation and performance experiments (Gravitational-Field-Day), which were funded in part by the NEA, and came to an abrupt end shortly after the presidential election of Ronald Reagan.

 

Read more...

more...
No comment yet.