Random Ephemera
5.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Random Ephemera
Cool, random finds that stand alone in their coolness
Curated by Daniel House
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Amazingly Detailed Photos of Massive Collections

Amazingly Detailed Photos of Massive Collections | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Though filled with dozens of subjects, each photo has an emotional core—the camping collection was inspired by a plastic flashlight Golden had as a kid and recently rediscovered at a thrift store, while the bright orange and yellow housewares came from Lane’s personal collection.

 

Despite owning a well-equipped photo studio, Golden didn’t have nearly enough gear for the camera photo. To pull off this shot, Golden and Lane had to become event organizers and librarians—the pair asked the Portland photography community to borrow gear for a day, resulting in donations of 400 pieces of kit that needed to be cataloged and a gathering of photographers that turned Golden’s studio into an impromptu photography convention. “It took Kristin and I 14 hours to lay out and photograph,” he says. “We have both learned a lot about what’s possible and what isn’t, how big these things can be compared to the scale of the items.”

 

The photos have a minimal style, but are really the result of Golden obsessive pursuit of perfectionism. “The scissors were a challenge,” he says. “I did one layout and didn’t like it, and redid it — my assistant thought I was nuts. Still, nothing was weirder than learning an old friend had over 5,000 scissors at his house.”

 

Golden’s still life series has collected a series of awards and honors that rivals some of the collections he’s photographed and has led to more corporate work, but he is always searching for the next astonishing assortment of esoteric products to photograph. “I shoot stuff I’m interested in and combine that with what I can get a hold of,” he says. “When I started, it was a bit harder, but now people are coming out of the woodwork and offering it.”

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Maps of the world made with spirographs

Maps of the world made with spirographs | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Artist Rachel Evans makes gorgeous poster-art with a spirograph, and has an especially sweet line of world-maps made using the technique, which she sells as posters. Click through for a video of her in action.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Look at These Amazing Cross Sections of Bullets | Wired Design

Look at These Amazing Cross Sections of Bullets | Wired Design | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

There’s a decent chance you know what’s going on inside a gun. You pull the trigger; the trigger releases the hammer; the hammer slaps the cartridge, and out the bullet fires. But what’s going on inside each of those cartridges? That’s what you can see here. “Ammo,” by Sabine Pearlman, is a series of photos of perfectly bisected projectiles. All have some sort of recognizable silhouette–either the short, stubby shape of a 9 mm cartridge, the chunky rectangular body of a shotgun shell, or the long menacing lines of higher-powered ammunition–but inside, we see, each has its own unique architecture.

 

Pearlman happened upon the cleaved ammo last autumn, when she was touring a Swiss military bunker set deep in a mountainside in the Alps. There were 900 different types of ammunition in all. “I instantly wanted to photograph them,” Pearlman says. She convinced the munitions expert there–the one who had actually cut the bullets in half–to let her document them, and returned shortly thereafter to see it through.

 

But photographing so many fragile specimens wasn’t easy. “With only one day to shoot and 900 photographs to be taken, I needed a way to expedite the process,” Pearlman explains. “The answer was a well organized assembly line. A local art store cut some sheets of white cardboard to size for me. The day of the shoot, the munitions specialist carefully lifted each cartridge out of a glass vitrine and placed them onto the cardboard. It was important to keep them upright and not spill out their contents. One by one, we slowly moved each specimen into the lighting setup to be photographed.

 

Daniel House's insight:

Creepy and Fascinating

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

The Beatles in Comics

The Beatles in Comics | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

A graphic history of the Fab Four.

Beatles in Comic Strips is the grown-up Beatle geek’s counterpart to the lovely vintage children’s book We Love You Beatles, and is guaranteed to delight in innumerable ways.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

How typeface influences the way we read and think

How typeface influences the way we read and think | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Last summer, CERN was on the verge of announcing a discovery so critical to understanding the basic building blocks of the universe that it had been given a divine name: The God particle.

 

The hunt for the Higgs boson was one of the most expensive and labor-intensive particle physics projects ever undertaken, and promised to answer the fundamental but elusive question of why our atoms stick together in the first place. And yet, when CERN researchers finally announced that they'd glimpsed the Higgs, the world's first reaction wasn't to cheer; it was to stifle collective laughter. The institution's scientists, cradling the most important scientific discovery of the decade, had chosen to present their findings to a breathless public using a peculiar font face: Comic Sans MS.

 

more...
Madara Mason's curator insight, July 31, 2013 3:59 PM

Does this justify the time I spend choosing the right font?

Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

The History of Photography, Animated

The origins of the cameras we use today were invented in the 19th century. Or were they? A millenia before, Arab scientist Alhazen was using the camera obscura to duplicate images, with Leonardo da Vinci following suit 500 years later and major innovations beginning in the 19th century. Eva Timothy tracks the trajectory from the most rudimentary cameras to the ubiquity of them today.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

18 Drawings You'll Swear Are Actual Photographs

18 Drawings You'll Swear Are Actual Photographs | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

At first glance (or second, or third), it looks like a photograph — maybe a little faded, compared to most high-definition shots we're now used to, but a photograph nonetheless. Right?

 

Take a look at a few of Samuel Silva's illustrations, as well as works from Miguel Endara, Paul Cadden and Dirk Dzimirsky. Some used ballpoint pens, while others worked with graphite and charcoal. However, they all have one thing in common: these incredible works are definitely not photographs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Psychedelic Portuguese Man-of-War Photos Prove God Is a Stoner

Psychedelic Portuguese Man-of-War Photos Prove God Is a Stoner | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

The sting from a Portuguese man-of-war hurts like hell, so most people avoid the jellyfish-like creatures. Not Aaron Ansarov — he and his wife don rubber gloves and collect them when they wash up on the beach near their home in Delray Beach, Florida.

They take the creatures back to their house and Ansarov photographs them on a makeshift light table and then mirrors the image in Photoshop. He shot dozens of them this past winter and the result is a unique, psychedelic portfolio.

“It’s kind of like nature’s Rorschach test,” he says.

Portugese man-of-wars are not jellyfish, they’re siphonophores, which mean’s they’re actually a group of organisms, called zooids, that depend on each other to live. The creature gets its name from the upper-most organism which people say looks like the man-of-war warships that were first built by England in the 16th century. A different organism forms the tentacles, which usually hang 30 feet below the surface and have venom-filled nematocysts that are used to kill small fish. Man-of-wars are most commonly found in warm water and sting thousands of humans each year.

Ansarov shoots the creatures on a light table because they’re translucent and the light coming from underneath helps illuminate their insides.

“Whenever I show the photos everyone sees something different,” he says. “One person will say ‘I see a person’s face’ and other people will see vaginas and other crazy sexual organs.”

The man-of-wars are usually alive when Ansarov and his wife find them on the beach, so the couple use a beer cooler filled with seawater to transport them home. The creatures are still alive when Ansarov photographs them and then he puts them back on the beach where he found them.

Man-of-wars have no way to move independently so they’re at the whim of tides and currents. They wash up on the beach naturally and Ansarov says he doesn’t want to interfere with the natural process. If they wash back into the sea when he’s done it was meant to be. If they don’t, they die.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

An Illustrated Tour of All the Buildings in New York

An Illustrated Tour of All the Buildings in New York | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

New York City has served as a muse to such literary greats as Gay Talese, Anaïs Nin, E. B. White, and Jan Morris. It has been the subject of cartographic love letters and famous diaries. And yet the essence of its spirit remains ever-elusive.

 

A couple of years ago, Australian illustrator James Gulliver Hancock moved to New York City and, in an effort to “own” his new home in his unique way, set out to draw every single building in town. Now, he is releasing the best of these drawings in All the Buildings in New York (That I’ve Drawn So Far) (public library) — a charmingly illustrated tour of Gotham’s cityscape and architecture, from icons to oddities, spanning the entire urban spectrum in between.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Never-before-seen photos from 100 years ago tell vivid story of gritty New York City

Never-before-seen photos from 100 years ago tell vivid story of gritty New York City | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Almost a million images of New York and its municipal operations have been made public for the first time on the internet.


The city's Department of Records officially announced the debut of the photo database.


Culled from the Municipal Archives collection of more than 2.2 million images going back to the mid-1800s, the 870,000 photographs feature all manner of city oversight -- from stately ports and bridges to grisly gangland killings.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Laura Brown
Scoop.it!

Morbid Anatomy

Morbid Anatomy | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

The Morbid Anatomy Library and Cabinet, Brooklyn, New York is a research library and private collection available to the interested public on Saturdays from 2-6 PM. The library/cabinet makes available a collection of books and catalogs, photographs, fine art, taxidermy, ephemera, and artifacts relating to medical museums, anatomical art, collectors and collecting, cabinets of curiosity, the history of medicine, death and society, natural history, arcane media, and curiosity and curiosities broadly considered.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Undone: Stunning Stop-Motion Animated Film About the Progression of Alzheimer’s

A drifting man struggles to pull objects from the roiling sea below him and scrambles to keep the objects from slipping through his fingers. A stop-motion animation using textured and tactile materials, as well as personal imagery, that represents the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Inspired by my grandfather.

 

Best Animated Short at Slamdance 2009.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Bejeweled Bodies, the Ultimate Veneration

Bejeweled Bodies, the Ultimate Veneration | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

I first became aware of Paul Koudounaris a couple of years back with the release of his Thames and Hudson book, The Empire of Death: A Cultural History of Ossuaries and Charnel Houses, but had forgotten about his beautiful and stunning imagery from religious ossuaries throughout Europe until I received an email from my friend Lee announcing the release of Koudounaris’ new book, Heavenly Bodies: Cult Treasures and Spectacular Saints from the Catacombs (also from T&H).

The ultimate veneration, these bejeweled bodies remind us distantly of the illuminated manuscripts from the earlier Middle Ages, but instead of decorating pages of text, we’re looking at the remains of various saints, both male and female, dressed and decorated with such subtle intricacy, all shimmering with silk and gold, sparkling in precious stones including rubies and emeralds. The result is breathtaking.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

The Batman Theme Played With Real Bat Sounds ...

The Batman Theme Played With Real Bat Sounds ... | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

That’s right. The duh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-BAT-MAAAAN theme has been recreated using ultrasonic bat sounds. The frequencies were shifted into the audible range, and then assigned a key so they’d match the original composition.

 

I think Adam West would approve

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

So You Want To Be a Writer: Bukowski Debunks the “Tortured Genius” Myth of Creativity

So You Want To Be a Writer: Bukowski Debunks the “Tortured Genius” Myth of Creativity | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Why do writers — great writers — write? We’ve heard from George Orwell, Joan Didion, and Susan Sontag. But one of the most poignant answers comes from a somewhat unlikely source: Charles Bukowski — he both cynical and soulful, and always unapologetically irreverent.

With lines like “unless the sun inside you is / burning your gut,” reminiscent of Ray Bradbury, and “unless it comes out of / your soul like a rocket,” reminiscent of Anaïs Nin, “so you want to be a writer,” from the altogether fantastic volume Sifting Through the Madness for the Word, the Line, the Way: New Poems, is a necessary reminder that, contrary to the culturally toxic tortured-genius myth, to create is to celebrate rather than bemoan life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

World's First Vertical Forest - in Milan

World's First Vertical Forest - in Milan | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Milan, one of the trendsetting capitals of the world, is applying their avant-garde tactics off the runway as well with 'vertical forests'.

The city has become one of the most polluted in Italy; with little room for an oxygen-giving forest in the middle of the bustling fashion capital, the only place to go was up.

 

Architect Stefano Boeri designed Bosco Verticale, a vertical forest which will plant 900 trees on the balconies of 2 towers. This vegetation produces the same ecological footprint as 10,000 square meters of forest. And anyway, this way is much more fashion-forward.

 

Aside from looking ridiculously gorgeous, the vertical forest has abundant positive eco-effects as well. The plants will produce humidity and oxygen while protecting from radiation and pollution through absorbing carbon dioxide. The towers will use Aeolian and photovoltaic energy systems to increase the buildings' self-sufficiency.

 

They will also attract birds and insects, creating a miniature ecosystem. The skyscraper forest was called “the most exciting new tower in the world” by the Financial Times and serves as an inspiration to other industrial spaces wishing to buffer their pollution output.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Gorgeous Grimm: 130 Years of Brothers Grimm Visual Legacy

Gorgeous Grimm: 130 Years of Brothers Grimm Visual Legacy | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

The fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm, part of UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register for the preservation of cultural documents, have been delighting and terrifying children since 1812, transfixing generations of parents, psychologists, and academics. The Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm is an astounding new volume from Taschen editor Noel Daniel bringing together the best illustrations from 130 years of The Brothers Grimm with 27 of the most beloved Grimm stories, including Cinderella, Snow White, The Little Red Riding Hood, and Sleeping Beauty, amidst artwork by some of the most celebrated illustrators from Germany, Britain, Sweden, Austria, the Czech Republic, Switzerland, and the United States working between the 1820s and 1950s.

 

The new translation is based on the final 1857 edition of the tales, and stunning silhouettes from original publications from the 1870s and 1920s grace the tome’s pages, alongside brand new silhouettes created bespoke for this remarkable new volume.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Dresses made from old maps

Dresses made from old maps | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it
Elisabeth Lecourt recycles old maps and turns them into beautiful dresses and shirts. I don't imagine they're wearable, but they'd look lovely on the wall nevertheless.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

The Elements of the Periodic Table, Personified as Illustrated Heroes

The Elements of the Periodic Table, Personified as Illustrated Heroes | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

As a lover of children’s books, especially illustrated science-inspired and nonfiction children’s books, I was instantly smitten with Wonderful Life with the Elements: The Periodic Table Personified (public library) by Japanese artist Bunpei Yorifuji, whose ingenious subway etiquette posters you might recall.

Lively and irreverent, this comic-inspired take on the Periodic Table gives each of the 118 known elements a distinctive character, with attitude and style reflective of the element’s respective chemical properties, era of discovery, and natural states. From Carbon’s ancient beard to the Nitrogen family’s rebellious mohawks to Hydrogen’s boastful might, the charming micro-vignettes nudge the young reader towards that ever-marvelous space where science and whimsy intersect.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

What 100 Years Look Like

What 100 Years Look Like | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Outside of that Smuckers-sponsored Willard Scott segment on the Today Show and the occasional hyperbolic news item on the rise of STDs in rest homes, we rarely see imagery of people over a certain age -- unless they're famous, and being trotted out to accept a lifetime achievement award. Perhaps this is why we're so smitten by the close-up portraits in Jahrhundertmensch, a new series by German photographer Karsten Thormaehlen that we spotted on PetaPixel.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Everything That Will Go Extinct In The Next 40 Years [Infographic]

Everything That Will Go Extinct In The Next 40 Years [Infographic] | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Goodbye newspapers, retirement, wrinkles, euro...

 

Futurist website nowandnext.com put together this awesome infographic predicting all of the technologies, behaviors, and ideas that will probably be distant memories by 2050.

Among their predictions: no more retirement four years from now, no more secretaries six years from now, and no more free parking or sit-down breakfasts by 2019.

 

The European Union is seen as surviving the current crisis before extinct in 2039.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Slide Show: A Secret History of Women and Tattoo

Slide Show: A Secret History of Women and Tattoo | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Anyone riding the Brooklyn L train these days can see that tattoo culture is thriving, especially among women. In fact, 2012 was the first year in which more women than men were tattooed in the U.S (twenty-three per cent of women, compared with nineteen per cent of men). Margot Mifflin’s 1997 book, “Bodies of Subversion: A Secret History of Women and Tattoo,” examines this trend, which, it turns out, has been surprisingly long in the making. The book is a cultural history, with photographs of tattooed women and female tattoo artists through the ages, beginning with a white Native American captive with a chin tattoo, from 1858. The third edition of the book, released yesterday, includes a hundred new photographs that examine how tattoo culture has evolved over the past fifteen years. As Mifflin writes in the introduction, “Tattoos appeal to contemporary women both as emblems of empowerment in an era of feminist gains and as badges of self-determination at a time when controversies about abortion rights, date rape, and sexual harassment have made them think hard about who controls their bodies—and why.” As we approach the fortieth anniversary of Roe v. Wade, this observation is especially resonant.

 

Though tattoos are an increasingly common, and visible, element of personal style these days, some of the more hidden and historic examples—from Victorian women to circus attractions—are the most surprising. Above is a selection of photographs of some of the first tattooed women and female tattoo artists from “Bodies of Subversion,” with captions by the author.

more...
Wilfred Miranda's curator insight, August 17, 2013 2:08 AM

Just goes to show you tattoos as an art form has been around way longer than many believe... And it's not going away! What do you think about these amazing ladies? #tattoos #photography #inked #inkedgirls

Scooped by Daniel House
Scoop.it!

Where Memes Really Come From

Where Memes Really Come From | Random Ephemera | Scoop.it

Though history will probably remember Richard Dawkins as the activist who spearheaded a new atheist movement, there is something far more famous and important that he invented — and few people know it. He is the guy who first popularized the idea of the meme, way back in the 1970s. That's right. Dawkins is indirectly responsible for every fruit-adorned cat, weird Japanese mashup video, and animated gif from Harry Potter fandom that has spurted out of the internet and into your face.

 

But of course, Dawkins's idea of memes wasn't quite the same thing as lolcats or ROFLCon. Here's how the idea of the meme evolved, and where it came from.

 

more...
No comment yet.