Dynamics on compl...
Follow
Find
2.6K views | +0 today
Dynamics on complex networks
Investigating how agents influence each other through a coupling network
Curated by Shaolin Tan
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

Spontaneous recovery in dynamical networks : Nature Physics : Nature Publishing Group

Spontaneous recovery in dynamical networks : Nature Physics : Nature Publishing Group | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it
Networks that fail can sometimes recover spontaneously[mdash]think of traffic jams suddenly easing or people waking from a coma.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

Human opinion dynamics: An inspiration to solve complex optimization problems : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Human opinion dynamics: An inspiration to solve complex optimization problems : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it
Human interactions give rise to the formation of different kinds of opinions in a society. The study of formations and dynamics of opinions has been one of the most important areas in social physics.
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, December 28, 2013 7:14 AM

Another paper on opinion dynamics.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, January 11, 2014 5:45 PM

Humanrithms....

Claude Emond's curator insight, January 20, 2014 5:51 PM

Opinions are an unescapable part of sharing and influencing the direction of collective intelligence

Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

Evolution and maintenance of cooperation via inheritance of neighborhood relationship

Evolution and maintenance of cooperation via inheritance of neighborhood relationship | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it
Shaolin Tan's insight:

Cooperative behaviors are ubiquitous in nature and human society. It is very important to understand the internal mechanism of emergence and maintenance of cooperation. As we know now, the offsprings inherit not only the phenotype but also the neighborhood relationship of their parents. Some recent research results show that the interactions among individuals facilitate survival of cooperation through network reciprocity of clustering cooperators. This paper aims at introducing an inheritance mechanism of neighborhood relationship to explore the evolution of cooperation. In detail, a mathematical model is proposed to characterize the evolutionary process with the above inheritance mechanism. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations indicate that high-level cooperation can emerge and be maintained for a wide variety of cost-to-benefit ratios, even if mutation happens during the evolving process.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

Virality Prediction and Community Structure in Social Networks : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Virality Prediction and Community Structure in Social Networks : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it
How does network structure affect diffusion? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends on the type of contagion. Complex contagions, unlike infectious diseases (simple contagions), are affected by social reinforcement and homophily.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

The Simple Rules of Social Contagion

It is commonly believed that information spreads between individuals like a pathogen, with each exposure by an informed friend potentially resulting in a naive individual becoming infected. However, empirical studies of social media suggest that individual response to repeated exposure to information is significantly more complex than the prediction of the pathogen model. As a proxy for intervention experiments, we compare user responses to multiple exposures on two different social media sites, Twitter and Digg. We show that the position of the exposing messages on the user-interface strongly affects social contagion. Accounting for this visibility significantly simplifies the dynamics of social contagion. The likelihood an individual will spread information increases monotonically with exposure, while explicit feedback about how many friends have previously spread it increases the likelihood of a response. We apply our model to real-time forecasting of user behavior.

 

The Simple Rules of Social Contagion
Nathan O. Hodas, Kristina Lerman

http://arxiv.org/abs/1308.5015


Via Complexity Digest
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, December 23, 2013 7:12 AM

Another paper about information propagation. A study on the user interface of two social sites, mainly the problem of limited attention and attention managment.

Claude Emond's curator insight, September 23, 2014 3:52 PM

A contagious feel-good-ness :)

Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

Characterizing the effect of network structure on evolutionary dynamics via a novel measure of structural heterogeneity

Characterizing the effect of network structure on evolutionary dynamics via a novel measure of structural heterogeneity | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it
Recently, the study of evolutionary dynamics on structured population has attracted an increasing attention in various fields. This paper aims at investigating the effect of network structure on evolutionary dynamics.
Shaolin Tan's insight:

An effective algorithm is proposed to generate selection amplifiers with desired size and average degree

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

Net gains

Physics — and physicists — have had much to contribute to economic and finance. Now the science of complex networks sets a way forward to understanding and managing the complex financial networks of the world's markets.

 

Net gains

Nature Physics 9, 119 (2013) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphys2588
Published online 01 March 2013

 

Focus issue: Complex networks in finance

http://www.nature.com/nphys/focus/finance/index.html


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

World citation and collaboration networks: uncovering the role of geography in science : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

World citation and collaboration networks: uncovering the role of geography in science : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it

Modern information and communication technologies, especially the Internet, have diminished the role of spatial distances and territorial boundaries on the access and transmissibility of information. This has enabled scientists for closer collaboration and internationalization. Nevertheless, geography remains an important factor affecting the dynamics of science. Here we present a systematic analysis of citation and collaboration networks between cities and countries, by assigning papers to the geographic locations of their authors’ affiliations. The citation flows as well as the collaboration strengths between cities decrease with the distance between them and follow gravity laws. In addition, the total research impact of a country grows linearly with the amount of national funding for research & development. However, the average impact reveals a peculiar threshold effect: the scientific output of a country may reach an impact larger than the world average only if the country invests more than about 100,000 USD per researcher annually.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

PLOS ONE: Knotty-Centrality: Finding the Connective Core of a Complex Network

PLOS ONE: Knotty-Centrality: Finding the Connective Core of a Complex Network | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it

A network measure called knotty-centrality is defined that quantifies the extent to which a given subset of a graph’s nodes constitutes a densely intra-connected topologically central connective core. Using this measure, the knotty centre of a network is defined as a sub-graph with maximal knotty-centrality. A heuristic algorithm for finding subsets of a network with high knotty-centrality is presented, and this is applied to previously published brain structural connectivity data for the cat and the human, as well as to a number of other networks. The cognitive implications of possessing a connective core with high knotty-centrality are briefly discussed.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Control Centrality and Hierarchical Structure in Complex Networks

Control Centrality and Hierarchical Structure in Complex Networks | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it

We introduce the concept of control centrality to quantify the ability of a single node to control a directed weighted network. We calculate the distribution of control centrality for several real networks and find that it is mainly determined by the network’s degree distribution. We show that in a directed network without loops the control centrality of a node is uniquely determined by its layer index or topological position in the underlying hierarchical structure of the network. Inspired by the deep relation between control centrality and hierarchical structure in a general directed network, we design an efficient attack strategy against the controllability of malicious networks.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

Negative Feedback Enables Fast and Flexible Collective Decision-Making in Ants

Positive feedback plays a major role in the emergence of many collective animal behaviours. In many ants pheromone trails recruit and direct nestmate foragers to food sources. The strong positive feedback caused by trail pheromones allows fast collective responses but can compromise flexibility. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that when the environment changes, colonies are often unable to reallocate their foragers to a more rewarding food source. Here we show both experimentally, using colonies of Lasius niger, and with an agent-based simulation model, that negative feedback caused by crowding at feeding sites allows ant colonies to maintain foraging flexibility even with strong recruitment to food sources. In a constant environment, negative feedback prevents the frequently found bias towards one feeder (symmetry breaking) and leads to equal distribution of foragers. In a changing environment, negative feedback allows a colony to quickly reallocate the majority of its foragers to a superior food patch that becomes available when foraging at an inferior patch is already well underway. The model confirms these experimental findings and shows that the ability of colonies to switch to a superior food source does not require the decay of trail pheromones. Our results help to resolve inconsistencies between collective foraging patterns seen in laboratory studies and observations in the wild, and show that the simultaneous action of negative and positive feedback is important for efficient foraging in mass-recruiting insect colonies.

 

Grüter C, Schürch R, Czaczkes TJ, Taylor K, Durance T, et al.

Negative Feedback Enables Fast and Flexible Collective Decision-Making in Ants.

PLoS ONE 7(9): e44501 (2012).

http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0044501


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

Analytical investigation of self-organized criticality in neural networks

Dynamical criticality has been shown to enhance information processing in dynamical systems, and there is evidence for self-organized criticality in neural networks. A plausible mechanism for such self-organization is activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here, we model neurons as discrete-state nodes on an adaptive network following stochastic dynamics. At a threshold connectivity, this system undergoes a dynamical phase transition at which persistent activity sets in. In a low-dimensional representation of the macroscopic dynamics, this corresponds to a transcritical bifurcation. We show analytically that adding activity-dependent rewiring rules, inspired by homeostatic plasticity, leads to the emergence of an attractive steady state at criticality and present numerical evidence for the system's evolution to such a state.

 

Analytical investigation of self-organized criticality in neural networks
Felix Droste, Anne-Ly Do and Thilo Gross

J. R. Soc. Interface

http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2012.0558


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

PLoS Computational Biology: Criticality Is an Emergent Property of Genetic Networks that Exhibit Evolvability

PLoS Computational Biology: Criticality Is an Emergent Property of Genetic Networks that Exhibit Evolvability | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it

Dynamically critical systems are those which operate at the border of a phase transition between two behavioral regimes often present in complex systems: order and disorder. Critical systems exhibit remarkable properties such as fast information processing, collective response to perturbations or the ability to integrate a wide range of external stimuli without saturation. Recent evidence indicates that the genetic networks of living cells are dynamically critical. This has far reaching consequences, for it is at criticality that living organisms can tolerate a wide range of external fluctuations without changing the functionality of their phenotypes. Therefore, it is necessary to know how genetic criticality emerged through evolution. Here we show that dynamical criticality naturally emerges from the delicate balance between two fundamental forces of natural selection that make organisms evolve: (i) the existing phenotypes must be resilient to random mutations, and (ii) new phenotypes must emerge for the organisms to adapt to new environmental challenges. The joint effect of these two forces, which are essential for evolvability, is sufficient in our computational models to generate populations of genetic networks operating at criticality. Thus, natural selection acting as a tinkerer of evolvable systems naturally generates critical dynamics.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

Evolutionary perspectives on collective decision making: Studying the implications of diversity and social network structure with agent-based simulations

Collective, especially group-based, managerial decision making is crucial in organizations. Using an evolutionary theory approach to collective decision making, agent-based simulations were conducted to investigate how collective decision making would be affected by the agents' diversity in problem understanding and/or behavior in discussion, as well as by their social network structure. Simulation results indicated that groups with consistent problem understanding tended to produce higher utility values of ideas and displayed better decision convergence, but only if there was no group-level bias in collective problem understanding. Simulation results also indicated the importance of balance between selection-oriented (i.e., exploitative) and variation-oriented (i.e., explorative) behaviors in discussion to achieve quality final decisions. Expanding the group size and introducing non-trivial social network structure generally improved the quality of ideas at the cost of decision convergence. Simulations with different social network topologies revealed that collective decision making on small-world networks with high local clustering tended to achieve highest decision quality more often than on random or scale-free networks. Implications of this evolutionary theory and simulation approach for future managerial research on collective, group, and multi-level decision making are discussed.

 

Evolutionary perspectives on collective decision making: Studying the implications of diversity and social network structure with agent-based simulations
Hiroki Sayama, Shelley D. Dionne, Francis J. Yammarino

http://arxiv.org/abs/1311.3674


Via Complexity Digest
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, December 28, 2013 7:15 AM

Some problems may only be solved through agent-based simulation.

Audiref Cía.'s curator insight, December 28, 2013 11:01 AM

Especialmente el grupo de base, la toma de decisiones colectiva, de gestión es fundamental en las organizaciones. El uso de un enfoque de la teoría evolutiva para la toma de decisiones colectiva, se llevaron a cabo simulaciones basadas en agentes para investigar cómo la toma de decisiones colectiva se vería afectada por la diversidad de los agentes en la comprensión y / o comportamiento en la discusión de problemas, así como por su estructura de red social. Resultados de la simulación indican que los grupos con entendimiento problema constante tienden a producir valores de utilidad más altos de las ideas y muestran una mejor toma de convergencia, pero sólo si no había ningún sesgo a nivel de grupo en la comprensión colectiva problema. 

Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Propagation Organique, Viralité - Spreading Phenomenons
Scoop.it!

Modelling social networks reveals how information spreads

Modelling social networks reveals how information spreads | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it
The way information spreads through society has changed significantly over the past decade with the advent of online social networking.

 

In the context of history, connectors are among the people who are pioneers of social change. We need only look back at political change within global society today to find examples of connectors that played a significant role in affecting that change at the time.

Experiments of this type (perhaps on a larger scale) could help develop our understanding of how our society functions in the 21st century. The speed at which information can spread, and the fidelity of the spread of that information, is important to perhaps all aspects of society. 


Via Marc Tirel
Shaolin Tan's insight:

In the experiment, if individuals are allowed to change to color accroding to the neighborhood, it may be more interesting. I think the evolutionary game dynamics on complex provides a proper model to characterize the above diffusion process.

more...
Marc Tirel's curator insight, October 14, 2013 4:25 AM

Interesting experimentation and conclusion : 

Experiments of this type (perhaps on a larger scale) could help develop our understanding of how our society functions in the 21st century. The speed at which information can spread, and the fidelity of the spread of that information, is important to perhaps all aspects of society.

António F Fonseca's curator insight, December 28, 2013 7:12 AM

First principles in information difusion on networks.

Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

Universality in network dynamics

Despite significant advances in characterizing the structural properties of complex networks, a mathematical framework that uncovers the universal properties of the interplay between the topology and the dynamics of complex systems continues to elude us. Here we develop a self-consistent theory of dynamical perturbations in complex systems, allowing us to systematically separate the contribution of the network topology and dynamics. The formalism covers a broad range of steady-state dynamical processes and offers testable predictions regarding the system’s response to perturbations and the development of correlations. It predicts several distinct universality classes whose characteristics can be derived directly from the continuum equation governing the system’s dynamics and which are validated on several canonical network-based dynamical systems, from biochemical dynamics to epidemic spreading. Finally, we collect experimental data pertaining to social and biological systems, demonstrating that we can accurately uncover their universality class even in the absence of an appropriate continuum theory that governs the system’s dynamics.

 

Universality in network dynamics
Baruch Barzel & Albert-László Barabási

Nature Physics 9, 673–681 (2013) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphys2741


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

Spreading of cooperative behaviour across interdependent groups : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Spreading of cooperative behaviour across interdependent groups : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it
Recent empirical research has shown that links between groups reinforce individuals within groups to adopt cooperative behaviour.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

The Power of Networks

The Power of Networks | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it
Nowadays, any organization should employ network scientists/analysts who are able to map and analyse complex systems that are of importance to the organization (e.g. the organization itself, its activities, a country’s economic activities, transportation networks, research networks).Interconnectivity is beneficial but also brings in vulnerability: if you and I are connected we can share resources; meanwhile your problems can become mine and vice versa.The concept of “crystallized imagination” refers to things that are first in our head and then become reality. This concept can be turned into network applied research on economic complexity of a country’s economic activities and development prospects.
Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

Predicting and controlling infectious disease epidemics using temporal networks

Predicting and controlling infectious disease epidemics using temporal networks | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it

Infectious diseases can be considered to spread over social networks of people or animals. Mainly owing to the development of data recording and analysis techniques, an increasing amount of social contact data with time stamps has been collected in the last decade. Such temporal data capture the dynamics of social networks on a timescale relevant to epidemic spreading and can potentially lead to better ways to analyze, forecast, and prevent epidemics. However, they also call for extended analysis tools for network epidemiology, which has, to date, mostly viewed networks as static entities. We review recent results of network epidemiology for such temporal network data and discuss future developments.

 

Predicting and controlling infectious disease epidemics using temporal networks

Naoki Masuda and Petter Holme

F1000Prime Rep2013, 5:6 (doi: 10.12703/P5-6)

http://f1000.com/prime/reports/b/5/6


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

Complex social contagion makes networks more vulnerable to disease outbreaks

Social network analysis is now widely used to investigate the dynamics of infectious disease spread from person to person. Vaccination dramatically disrupts the disease transmission process on a contact network, and indeed, sufficiently high vaccination rates can disrupt the process to such an extent that disease transmission on the network is effectively halted. Here, we build on mounting evidence that health behaviors - such as vaccination, and refusal thereof - can spread through social networks through a process of complex contagion that requires social reinforcement. Using network simulations that model both the health behavior and the infectious disease spread, we find that under otherwise identical conditions, the process by which the health behavior spreads has a very strong effect on disease outbreak dynamics. This variability in dynamics results from differences in the topology within susceptible communities that arise during the health behavior spreading process, which in turn depends on the topology of the overall social network. Our findings point to the importance of health behavior spread in predicting and controlling disease outbreaks.

 

Complex social contagion makes networks more vulnerable to disease outbreaks

Ellsworth Campbell, Marcel Salathé

http://arxiv.org/abs/1211.0518


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

Beyond pairwise strategy updating in the prisoner's dilemma game : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Beyond pairwise strategy updating in the prisoner's dilemma game : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it

In spatial games players typically alter their strategy by imitating the most successful or one randomly selected neighbor. Since a single neighbor is taken as reference, the information stemming from other neighbors is neglected, which begets the consideration of alternative, possibly more realistic approaches. Here we show that strategy changes inspired not only by the performance of individual neighbors but rather by entire neighborhoods introduce a qualitatively different evolutionary dynamics that is able to support the stable existence of very small cooperative clusters. This leads to phase diagrams that differ significantly from those obtained by means of pairwise strategy updating. In particular, the survivability of cooperators is possible even by high temptations to defect and over a much wider uncertainty range. We support the simulation results by means of pair approximations and analysis of spatial patterns, which jointly highlight the importance of local information for the resolution of social dilemmas.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Spontaneous Emergence, Imitation and Spread of Alternative Foraging Techniques among Groups of Vervet Monkeys

Spontaneous Emergence, Imitation and Spread of Alternative Foraging Techniques among Groups of Vervet Monkeys | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it

Animal social learning has become a subject of broad interest, but demonstrations of bodily imitation in animals remain rare. Based on Voelkl and Huber's study of imitation by marmosets, we tested four groups of semi-captive vervet monkeys presented with food in modified film canisters (“aethipops’). One individual was trained to take the tops off canisters in each group and demonstrated five openings to them. In three groups these models used their mouth to remove the lid, but in one of the groups the model also spontaneously pulled ropes on a canister to open it. In the last group the model preferred to remove the lid with her hands.

 

Following these spontaneous differentiations of foraging techniques in the models, we observed the techniques used by the other group members to open the canisters. We found that mouth opening was the most common technique overall, but the rope and hands methods were used significantly more in groups they were demonstrated in than in groups where they were not. Our results show bodily matching that is conventionally described as imitation. We discuss the relevance of these findings to discoveries about mirror neurons, and implications of the identity of the model for social transmission.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

Restricted cooperative games on metabolic networks reveal functionally important reactions

Understanding the emerging properties of complex biological systems is in the crux of systems biology studies. Computational methods for elucidating the role of each component in the synergetic interplay can be used to identify targets for genetic and metabolic engineering. In particular, we aim at determining the importance of reactions in a metabolic network with respect to a specific biological function.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shaolin Tan from Papers
Scoop.it!

A 61-million-person experiment in social influence and political mobilization

A 61-million-person experiment in social influence and political mobilization | Dynamics on complex networks | Scoop.it

Human behaviour is thought to spread through face-to-face social networks, but it is difficult to identify social influence effects in observational studies, and it is unknown whether online social networks operate in the same way. Here we report results from a randomized controlled trial of political mobilization messages delivered to 61 million Facebook users during the 2010 US congressional elections. The results show that the messages directly influenced political self-expression, information seeking and real-world voting behaviour of millions of people. Furthermore, the messages not only influenced the users who received them but also the users’ friends, and friends of friends. The effect of social transmission on real-world voting was greater than the direct effect of the messages themselves, and nearly all the transmission occurred between ‘close friends’ who were more likely to have a face-to-face relationship. These results suggest that strong ties are instrumental for spreading both online and real-world behaviour in human social networks.

 

A 61-million-person experiment in social influence and political mobilization

Robert M. Bond, Christopher J. Fariss, Jason J. Jones, Adam D. I. Kramer, Cameron Marlow, Jaime E. Settle & James H. Fowler

Nature 489, 295–298 (13 September 2012) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11421


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shaolin Tan
Scoop.it!

Direct reciprocity in structured populations

Reciprocity and repeated games have been at the center of attention when studying the evolution of human cooperation. Direct reciprocity is considered to be a powerful mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, and it is generally assumed that it can lead to high levels of cooperation. Here we explore an open-ended, infinite strategy space, where every strategy that can be encoded by a finite state automaton is a possible mutant. Surprisingly, we find that direct reciprocity alone does not lead to high levels of cooperation. Instead we observe perpetual oscillations between cooperation and defection, with defection being substantially more frequent than cooperation. The reason for this is that “indirect invasions” remove equilibrium strategies: every strategy has neutral mutants, which in turn can be invaded by other strategies. However, reciprocity is not the only way to promote cooperation. Another mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, which has received as much attention, is assortment because of population structure. Here we develop a theory that allows us to study the synergistic interaction between direct reciprocity and assortment. This framework is particularly well suited for understanding human interactions, which are typically repeated and occur in relatively fluid but not unstructured populations. We show that if repeated games are combined with only a small amount of assortment, then natural selection favors the behavior typically observed among humans: high levels of cooperation implemented using conditional strategies.

more...
No comment yet.