Random
38 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Technology and Gadgets
Scoop.it!

LG's Flexible Smartphone Display To Go Into Mass Production | Geeky Gadgets

LG's Flexible Smartphone Display To Go Into Mass Production | Geeky Gadgets | Random | Scoop.it
Earlier today we heard that Samsung are expected to announce their new flexible display smartphone shortly, LG also has a flexible smartphone in the works.

Via Tiaan Jonker
more...
robyns tut's curator insight, October 14, 2013 5:28 PM

This is so interesting. Where we once had bulky brick cellphones, now they are as thin as paper. - Sara

poojarajput's curator insight, October 15, 2013 8:09 AM

http://www.jagran.com/lifestyle/technology-news-hindi.html

Richard Platt's curator insight, October 19, 2013 12:45 PM

More flexible screens - expect to see more of this in the wearable domain

Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Art, Design & Technology
Scoop.it!

a massive submarine emerges in milan's city center

a massive submarine emerges in milan's city center | Random | Scoop.it

Via Deloste
more...
Deloste's curator insight, October 2, 2013 11:36 AM

by M&C saatchi milano

adaki's curator insight, October 5, 2013 6:11 AM

viral bat. Funtzionatu zuen?

Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Science & Engineering
Scoop.it!

Odd Science: What Looks Like a Big Goose Egg May Actually Be Golden - Pacific Standard

Odd Science: What Looks Like a Big Goose Egg May Actually Be Golden - Pacific Standard | Random | Scoop.it
Odd Science: What Looks Like a Big Goose Egg May Actually Be Golden
Pacific Standard
Thursday, the U.S. Congress honored researchers who studied lizard spit, taught computers how to identify true love, and boiled bacteria.

Via The Geek Girl Show
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Drawing and Painting Tutorials
Scoop.it!

ImagineFX.com | Painting Perfect Skin

ImagineFX.com | Painting Perfect Skin | Random | Scoop.it

Marta Dahlig explains everything you need to know about creating realistic complexions for your portraits.

 

Painting skin is one of the hardest tasks faced by every photorealistic painter, due to the number of factors that make up a final effect – colour choices, blending techniques, special brush usage and custom texturing are all equally important to achieve a truly realistic effect. It’s also crucial to remember that different types of skin require a different approach and therefore a different combination of  these elements. A delicate porcelain skin tone will require a similar technique to the transparent skin typical for babies, but will drastically differ to darker skin rendition methods.


Via Hovhannes
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Technology and Gadgets
Scoop.it!

EmoPulse Smile: A Bracelet Smartwatch Jam-Packed With Useful Features

EmoPulse Smile: A Bracelet Smartwatch Jam-Packed With Useful Features | Random | Scoop.it
There are a lot of technology companies announcing their own innovative smartwatch right now, but are they as innovative as the EmoPulse Smile smartwatch?

Via Tiaan Jonker
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, September 17, 2013 10:52 AM

Everyone is getting in on the act of wearable technology

rrenny's curator insight, September 18, 2013 4:09 AM

nice 

Alex Simon's curator insight, September 18, 2013 6:00 PM

I love technology!

Scooped by Jacob Peterson
Scoop.it!

Time passes more slowly for flies, study finds

Time passes more slowly for flies, study finds | Random | Scoop.it
Research suggests perception of time is linked to size, explaining why insects find it easy to avoid being swatted (Time passes more slowly for flies.
http://t.co/VOBsg01iYg)...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Inspired By Design
Scoop.it!

The History of the Pixar Logo Animation

The History of the Pixar Logo Animation | Random | Scoop.it
Pixar's production logo—that animation sequence that pops up before a Pixar movie—is as iconic as they come. Who can't help but smile when they see cute little Luxo Jr. squash the I in Pixar and turn its bulb towards you.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
more...
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Art, Design & Technology
Scoop.it!

vintage flip clock : brick

vintage flip clock : brick | Random | Scoop.it

Via Deloste
more...
Deloste's curator insight, September 13, 2013 8:17 AM

by LEFF amsterdam

Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

The 21st-Century Digital Learner

The 21st-Century Digital Learner | Random | Scoop.it

After hosting dozens of these conversations, I realize one thing: We just don't listen enough to our students. The tradition in education has been not to ask the students what they think or want, but rather for adult educators to design the system and curriculum by themselves, using their "superior" knowledge and experience.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 24, 2013 5:27 PM

Just as speaking is the outcome of listening, so writing is the outcome of reading, not the other way round. Listening to the student should also include "listening" to their writing. ie., analyse what they are saying and how they are doing it.  When students evaluate their own work, the teacher should listen and guide them to ways of improving it, whether it be punctuation, paragraphing, spelling, or word or subject knowledge.  This is how we bring students on board and empower them to learn. 

Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:49 PM

Listening to students has two aspects; listening to what they say orally, and 'listening' to their writing which is only another way of talking, only through a code. Just as learning to speak is tied closely to listening to what is said and being exposed to words that help one to think better, so writing is the same  and relies on reading "or listening" to what others say and how they say it to express clear meaning. The two subjects, reading and writing, are closlely intertwined yet we compartmentalize them in the literacy curriculum. An example of adults thinking they know what is best for children.  

Nuno Ricardo Oliveira's curator insight, December 28, 2013 11:53 AM

The 21st-Century Digital Learner

Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Literature for the ESL classroom
Scoop.it!

Book News: Slam Poet's 'OCD' Love Poem Makes Waves - NPR

Book News: Slam Poet's 'OCD' Love Poem Makes Waves - NPR | Random | Scoop.it
Book News: Slam Poet's 'OCD' Love Poem Makes Waves
NPR
Former Poet Laureate Robert Hass and NPR commentator Frank Deford also took prizes.

Via agmz30
more...
agmz30's curator insight, August 15, 2013 1:41 PM

Love poem which incorporates aspects ot the poet's Obsessive Compulsive Order into the poem itself goes viral . 

Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Bentleigh Secondary College Meditation & Indigenous Cultural Centre, Australia

Bentleigh Secondary College Meditation & Indigenous Cultural Centre, Australia | Random | Scoop.it

Designed by Suters Architects, the sustainable Meditation and Indigenous Cultural Centre at Bentleigh Secondary College has opened its doors to students and teachers.

Set in the schools Moorooboon wetland, the building acts as a piece of furniture – something to be sat in, on and around – whist students engage with the surroundings and a curriculum focused the environment, culture and mindfulness.

The project educates students about the importance of sustainable design. Constructed entirely of timber the centre incorporates passive heating and cooling design, carbon sequestration design, a wind turbine to provide power and a future geothermal exchange unit for heating and cooling.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Gale Griffiths's curator insight, September 6, 2013 6:04 AM

We need more of this in the world!

Scooped by Jacob Peterson
Scoop.it!

Green compensation scheme outlined

Green compensation scheme outlined | Random | Scoop.it
The UK government has outlined its proposals on compensating for the loss of biodiversity through development. (Controversial "biodiversity offsetting" is a "licence to trash". Planning offsets history of failure they have !
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Peterson
Scoop.it!

Is the Brain the Key to Understanding Religion?

Is the Brain the Key to Understanding Religion? | Random | Scoop.it

What makes us human? The way we think is surely part of the answer. Among our thinking skills, self-awareness is a promising candidate for the cognitive capacity that sets us apart from the other animals on earth. The distinction is not absolute – evolutionary differences seldom are. We know that chimpanzees can recognise themselves in mirrors, and to that extent are self-conscious. But it is likely that we and only we have a really well-developed understanding of ourselves as subjects of experience — as animals with minds. [.] These capacities, for “theory of mind” and mental time travel, together with our closely related talent for language, have been identified by many contemporary thinkers — in psychology, anthropology and elsewhere — as the intellectual hallmarks of adult humankind. But if we want to understand how we experience the world, listing capacities does only half the job, as it says little about the content of our self-understanding. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Drawing and Painting Tutorials
Scoop.it!

Manga Tutorials - How to Shade Your Drawings

Manga Tutorials - How to Shade Your Drawings | Random | Scoop.it

Basics
Shading can be a bit tricky at first but its not as difficult as it seems. The picture to the right shows a light bulb and several geometrical shapes; circle, triangle, cylinder, and a square. 

You'll notice that one side of the shape is light and the other is darkened. All you need to know or keep in mind is just that. What the light doesn't hit, it is darkened. In this example, all you have to do is picture the light source and the object which is being hit by the light --  which part will the light hit? How far will the light go? 

You also have to ask yourself where is the light source coming from? If the light is far above, the shorter the shadow is (try checking out your shadow at noon - 12:00PM) whereas the lower the light, the longer the shadow will become. According to the light source, make your shadow fit accordingly.

Good thing to remember also: what is the shape of the object I'm giving a shadow?Each of the shapes in the picture each have their own unique cast. The triangle has a pointy shadow, the circle has a circular shadow, the cylinder has a rectangular shadow, and the cube has a "L"-like shadow. At a different angle, though, the cube will cast a different shadow shape. For instance, if the light was head-on to one of the flat sides, it will cast a square to rectangular shadow depending on the light source's height.

With that in mind, you also need to remember: what is the shape of the object the shadow is falling on top of? The current example only has a flat surface on which the shadows fall but in most cases, shadows of - say a character - will fall on rocks or on water, which will look different compared to each other. 


Via Cristina Gevorgyan
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from SEO Tips, Advice, Help
Scoop.it!

13 Iconic Movie Quotes With Internet-Obsessed Twists

13 Iconic Movie Quotes With Internet-Obsessed Twists | Random | Scoop.it
Times have changed, and we're not so sure these famous movie quotes hold up in the digital age.

Via Bonnie Burns
more...
Bonnie Burns's curator insight, September 27, 2013 11:30 AM

Yet times have changed, and these famous quotes don't quite connect to the digital age. Dorothy wouldn't have woken up lost in Kansas without at least questioning the reliability of her GPS.

malek's comment, September 27, 2013 2:02 PM
Don Corleone is more tech savvy...thank you for sharing
robyns tut's comment, September 30, 2013 11:55 AM
I love it when they make things like this. There is a video on how WW2 would have played out if it were over Facebook and also the nativity scene over Facebook. The funny thing is it is so true and relatable. - Sara
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Literature & Psychology
Scoop.it!

12 Most Twisted Families in Books - Huffington Post

12 Most Twisted Families in Books - Huffington Post | Random | Scoop.it
12 Most Twisted Families in Books
Huffington Post

 

Authors know that when we read novels we want to get to know extraordinary, even unhinged, characters. The novelists who influence my writing created memorable families that broke societal rules and, in the process, startled, often shocked, readers. These clans are defined by one characteristic: Violence--brutality that is passed down from one generation to the next.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Literature and mobility
Scoop.it!

Maître d’ for the Mind

Maître d’ for the Mind | Random | Scoop.it
Andrew Johnson has been selling used books for eight years on the streets outside the Queensbridge public housing project, telling his customers, “You got to feed your mind like you feed your body.”

Via Judith Robertson
more...
Judith Robertson's curator insight, September 14, 2013 6:12 PM

This is a feel good story that warms the heart, about a man sufficiently enamoured of a love of reading that he brands himself "The Book Man' in an undertaking to bring books to his public housing neighbourhood in greater NYC.  He sells to moms and dads, kids, and even drug dealers, and he can even tell you what each of their favourite titles are. Self-help books are his greatest sellers.

Scooped by Jacob Peterson
Scoop.it!

OpenTable Says These Are The Best US Restaurants For Foodies

OpenTable Says These Are The Best US Restaurants For Foodies | Random | Scoop.it
The results of OpenTable's "Fit For Foodies" list show the best American restaurants for foodies.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Peterson
Scoop.it!

History of Grand Theft Auto

Danny explores how GTA evolved from a top down, arcade shooter to one of the biggest franchises in video games history. Follow GTA V at GameSpot.com!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering
Scoop.it!

Biomaterials and Biotechnology: From the Discovery of the First Angiogenesis Inhibitors to the Development of Controlled Drug Delivery Systems and the Foundation of Tissue engineering - Dr. Robert ...


Via Jacob Blumenthal
more...
Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, September 13, 2013 5:01 AM

This is a great talk by Dr. Robert Langer about the development of drug delivery systems and the early days of tissue engineering! 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Join our Linkedin group for stem cells, regenerative medicine and embryonic development updates and discussions:

http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=4972382&trk=anet_ug_hm

Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Inspired By Design
Scoop.it!

Sustainable house on the Geul by Upfrnt and Zwarthout

Sustainable house on the Geul by Upfrnt and Zwarthout | Random | Scoop.it

“This riverside holiday house in South Limburg, the Netherlands, is raised on tree trunks to prevent flooding and clad with charred wood to reduce the need for maintenance (+ slideshow). (more...)”


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Drawing and Painting Tutorials
Scoop.it!

How to Draw a Detailed Tree

How to Draw a Detailed Tree | Random | Scoop.it
Drawing a detailed tree is not all that hard. The first thing you will need is a little time, quiet, and good concentration. Draw the trunk of the tree and draw your way up. Details don't matter for now, just draw the general shape of the...

Via Arusiak Kanetsyan
more...
Arusiak Kanetsyan's curator insight, September 6, 2013 4:40 AM

A very simple step by step tutorial on how to draw a tree.

Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Literature for the ESL classroom
Scoop.it!

Book News: Slam Poet's 'OCD' Love Poem Makes Waves - NPR

Book News: Slam Poet's 'OCD' Love Poem Makes Waves - NPR | Random | Scoop.it
Book News: Slam Poet's 'OCD' Love Poem Makes Waves
NPR
Former Poet Laureate Robert Hass and NPR commentator Frank Deford also took prizes.

Via agmz30
more...
agmz30's curator insight, August 15, 2013 1:41 PM

Love poem which incorporates aspects ot the poet's Obsessive Compulsive Order into the poem itself goes viral . 

Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from Art, Design & Technology
Scoop.it!

Sound of Light - Emergency Whistle for hikers

Sound of Light - Emergency Whistle for hikers | Random | Scoop.it

Via Deloste
more...
Rescooped by Jacob Peterson from JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
Scoop.it!

A Palatable Javascript Pattern

A Palatable Javascript Pattern | Random | Scoop.it

I don’t always write raw Javascript, but when I do I use this pattern to make it less painful.

Love the language, or hate it – I don’t think it’s debatable that its mechanisms for defining abstract data types are a bit… incoherent. This isn’t necessarily anyone’s fault; we know that the core of the language was bung out under duress and time pressure. But what we have to work with is a mishmash of dictionary types, an unfinished prototype system, a little bit of a Smalltalk/Java class system, and this behavior that not even a mother could love.

When I’m writing large amounts of code to run in the browser, I tend to approach the problem with higher level tools – GWT, JSX, TypeScript, Dart, Closure, and so forth. I personally find that I need a type checker to manage large projects (especially with a team), and at certain scales an optimizing compiler becomes indispensible. And for very simple scripts, simple Javascript with just dictionaries and functions is perfectly serviceable. But what about those occasions where you either can’t use a compiler (e.g., because you’re writing code for someone who doesn’t want to integrate it into their build system), or it’s too painful to be worth the effort (e.g., medium-sized Chrome extensions)?

When I find myself in this situation, I fall back to a pattern that I find takes a lot of the pain out of raw Javascript. I feel it gives me just the right set of abstractions to keep the code from turning into a creeping spaghetti monster, without much boilerplate, and that eliminates a few very difficult-to-avoid Javascript errors. The following is a simple, contrived example that should get the rough idea across. You may note that it derives to a certain extent from what’s come to be known as the Crockford Pattern, though I’ve extended it a bit.


Via Jan Hesse
more...
No comment yet.