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Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says |
Modern Healthcare

Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Medical coders participating in an ICD-10 coding pilot produced accurate coding using the complex new system less than two-thirds of the time, according to a report by two healthcare IT industry groups.

Via Texas Medical Association
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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Texas Medical Association's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:39 PM

See full report: http://www.himss.org/files/HIMSSorg/Content/files/ICD-10_NPP_Outcomes_Report.pdf

 

TMA's position:

 

Put ICD-10 on permanent hold

 

The ICD-10 requirement is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 no later than Oct. 1, 2014. The punishment for noncompliance is severe: no payment for any medical services provided.

 

The number of diagnostic codes that physicians would be required to use under ICD-10 would grow from 13,500 to 69,000. The number of codes for inpatient procedures also would soar from 4,000 to 71,000. For example, the new system has 480 codes for a fractured knee cap — up from a grand total of two in ICD-9. Switching to ICD-10 will mandate extensive revision of physicians’ paper and electronic systems. Transition to the new system is expected to cost solo physicians as much as $83,000 each, and group practices of up to 10 doctors as much as $250,000.

 

The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s PQRS and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the diagnostic and procedure codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2015. It is being designed for use with electronic health records and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10. 

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:34 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says |
Modern Healthcare

Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Medical coders participating in an ICD-10 coding pilot produced accurate coding using the complex new system less than two-thirds of the time, according to a report by two healthcare IT industry groups.

Via Texas Medical Association
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

more...
Texas Medical Association's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:39 PM

See full report: http://www.himss.org/files/HIMSSorg/Content/files/ICD-10_NPP_Outcomes_Report.pdf

 

TMA's position:

 

Put ICD-10 on permanent hold

 

The ICD-10 requirement is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 no later than Oct. 1, 2014. The punishment for noncompliance is severe: no payment for any medical services provided.

 

The number of diagnostic codes that physicians would be required to use under ICD-10 would grow from 13,500 to 69,000. The number of codes for inpatient procedures also would soar from 4,000 to 71,000. For example, the new system has 480 codes for a fractured knee cap — up from a grand total of two in ICD-9. Switching to ICD-10 will mandate extensive revision of physicians’ paper and electronic systems. Transition to the new system is expected to cost solo physicians as much as $83,000 each, and group practices of up to 10 doctors as much as $250,000.

 

The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s PQRS and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the diagnostic and procedure codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2015. It is being designed for use with electronic health records and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10. 

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:32 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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The Effects of Medicaid Expansion under the ACA: Findings from a Literature Review

The Effects of Medicaid Expansion under the ACA: Findings from a Literature Review | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Research on the effects of Medicaid expansions under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) can help increase understanding of how the ACA has impacted coverage; access to care, utilization, and health outcomes; and various economic outcomes, including...
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Texas doctors lobby for two-year ICD-10 delay

Texas doctors lobby for two-year ICD-10 delay | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
The Texas physicians' group has been in the forefront of physician opposition to ICD-10, remaining so even after HHS issued its final rule in August to comply with the congressional mandate.

Via Texas Medical Association
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Texas Medical Association's curator insight, December 3, 2014 4:37 PM

TMA says:

 

Forced adoption of International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10), is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 by Oct. 1, 2015. 


The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with absolutely no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing complex EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2017. It is being designed for use with EHRs and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10.

 

After three deadline extensions, TMA is asking the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to delay ICD-10 permanently until ICD-11 or another appropriate replacement for ICD-9 is ready for widespread implementation. 

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Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says |
Modern Healthcare

Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Medical coders participating in an ICD-10 coding pilot produced accurate coding using the complex new system less than two-thirds of the time, according to a report by two healthcare IT industry groups.

Via Texas Medical Association, Rajat Dhameja
more...
Texas Medical Association's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:39 PM

See full report: http://www.himss.org/files/HIMSSorg/Content/files/ICD-10_NPP_Outcomes_Report.pdf

 

TMA's position:

 

Put ICD-10 on permanent hold

 

The ICD-10 requirement is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 no later than Oct. 1, 2014. The punishment for noncompliance is severe: no payment for any medical services provided.

 

The number of diagnostic codes that physicians would be required to use under ICD-10 would grow from 13,500 to 69,000. The number of codes for inpatient procedures also would soar from 4,000 to 71,000. For example, the new system has 480 codes for a fractured knee cap — up from a grand total of two in ICD-9. Switching to ICD-10 will mandate extensive revision of physicians’ paper and electronic systems. Transition to the new system is expected to cost solo physicians as much as $83,000 each, and group practices of up to 10 doctors as much as $250,000.

 

The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s PQRS and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the diagnostic and procedure codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2015. It is being designed for use with electronic health records and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10. 

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:32 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:34 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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State Government won't release financial data for study into whether ... - Herald Sun

State Government won't release financial data for study into whether ... - Herald Sun | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
State Government won't release financial data for study into whether ...
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2 ways to cut spinal surgery costs

2 ways to cut spinal surgery costs | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Spinal surgeries remain costly even as they increase in popularity, prompting clinicians and surgical center business managers to find ways to trim dollars off each procedure.
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

Negotiate outpatient surgery  costs upfront and prevent add-on costs to reduce cost of spinal surgeries

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Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says |
Modern Healthcare

Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Medical coders participating in an ICD-10 coding pilot produced accurate coding using the complex new system less than two-thirds of the time, according to a report by two healthcare IT industry groups.

Via Texas Medical Association
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

more...
Texas Medical Association's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:39 PM

See full report: http://www.himss.org/files/HIMSSorg/Content/files/ICD-10_NPP_Outcomes_Report.pdf

 

TMA's position:

 

Put ICD-10 on permanent hold

 

The ICD-10 requirement is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 no later than Oct. 1, 2014. The punishment for noncompliance is severe: no payment for any medical services provided.

 

The number of diagnostic codes that physicians would be required to use under ICD-10 would grow from 13,500 to 69,000. The number of codes for inpatient procedures also would soar from 4,000 to 71,000. For example, the new system has 480 codes for a fractured knee cap — up from a grand total of two in ICD-9. Switching to ICD-10 will mandate extensive revision of physicians’ paper and electronic systems. Transition to the new system is expected to cost solo physicians as much as $83,000 each, and group practices of up to 10 doctors as much as $250,000.

 

The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s PQRS and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the diagnostic and procedure codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2015. It is being designed for use with electronic health records and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10. 

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:34 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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Does the Patient-Centered Medical Home Work? Yes, and...

Does the Patient-Centered Medical Home Work? Yes, and... | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Dr. Michael Barr weighs in on a new five-year patient-centered medical home study. The study proves effectiveness of NCQA's PCMH Recognition program.  
Via Texas Medical Association
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Patient centered medical home
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What Happens When iOS Apps Can Access Health Records

What Happens When iOS Apps Can Access Health Records | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it

Besides being a way to increase medication adherence, identifying pills on the fly could ensure patients don't encounter unwanted side effects or somehow ingest the wrong medication. But the data play here is much bigger: Indexing the world's pill supply.

 

Optical character recognition and image recognition have spawned all sorts of amazing mobile apps. They can help users identify trees in the forest, identify business cards, and even measure heart rate. Now one new iPhone product, MedSnap ID, could change the way pharmacies are run by allowing for the instant identification of pills via phone camera.

 

MedSnap's product can help reduce the tens of thousands of patient deaths from accidental drug interactions annually, and save pharmacies and health care providers a ton by cutting down on wasted manpower from slower traditional medication history management tools.

 

Users place a set of pills on a special tray or a clear imaging service, take a picture with MedSnap, and the product's algorithms identify the pills from 60 images used for machine indexing.

 

Pills are identified through a combination of imprint recognition (the characters or logo on the pill) and visual characteristics (size, color, density, etc.). Apart from the company's current database--which is primarily centered on drugs available in the United States--users can add to what the company calls the Pill Mapping Project, an effort to “index the world's prescription drug supply so that it can be ready by a technology using a smart phone in a healthcare, patient, or caregiver environment.”

 

Identifying pills in medical settings is important, if only for the fact that an overworked, inattentive, or distracted medical professional can endanger lives by handing the wrong medication to the wrong person. Medical institutions currently use a host of proprietary products to identify pills, many of which require trips back and forth to a computer terminal. Apart from wasting time and money for the health care provider, this also ironically increases chances of a pharmacist being distracted.

  


Via nrip, Mark
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Always nice to reacd about technology in healthcare.
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Beaumont's new health system looks to compete on cost, quality ...

Beaumont's new health system looks to compete on cost, quality ... | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
"They know people will look at (hospital and physician) networks as a value proposition because they will be paying a higher percentage of those costs out of pocket." But consolidation to position for managed care contracting ...
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Beaumont's new health system looks to compete on cost, quality ...

Beaumont's new health system looks to compete on cost, quality ... | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
"They know people will look at (hospital and physician) networks as a value proposition because they will be paying a higher percentage of those costs out of pocket." But consolidation to position for managed care contracting ...
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Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says |
Modern Healthcare

Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Medical coders participating in an ICD-10 coding pilot produced accurate coding using the complex new system less than two-thirds of the time, according to a report by two healthcare IT industry groups.

Via Texas Medical Association, Rajat Dhameja
more...
Texas Medical Association's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:39 PM

See full report: http://www.himss.org/files/HIMSSorg/Content/files/ICD-10_NPP_Outcomes_Report.pdf

 

TMA's position:

 

Put ICD-10 on permanent hold

 

The ICD-10 requirement is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 no later than Oct. 1, 2014. The punishment for noncompliance is severe: no payment for any medical services provided.

 

The number of diagnostic codes that physicians would be required to use under ICD-10 would grow from 13,500 to 69,000. The number of codes for inpatient procedures also would soar from 4,000 to 71,000. For example, the new system has 480 codes for a fractured knee cap — up from a grand total of two in ICD-9. Switching to ICD-10 will mandate extensive revision of physicians’ paper and electronic systems. Transition to the new system is expected to cost solo physicians as much as $83,000 each, and group practices of up to 10 doctors as much as $250,000.

 

The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s PQRS and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the diagnostic and procedure codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2015. It is being designed for use with electronic health records and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10. 

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:32 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:34 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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Medtronic to buy Covidien, move corporate office to Ireland

Medtronic - Covidien deal

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http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-16/medtronic-seeks-wider-health-care-reach-in-covidien-deal.html

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103 ASC Administrators to Know - Becker's ASC Review

103 ASC Administrators to Know - Becker's ASC Review | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
103 ASC Administrators to Know
Becker's ASC Review
Joseph Colbert is administrator at North Coast Surgery Center in Oceanside, Calif., a joint venture between physician partners, Tri-City Medical Center and Surgical Care Affiliates.
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

It's great to see more lists of healthcare administrators as this one. for Ambulatory Care Administrators. We come across lists for best cities, best restaurants, the richest , most influential. We need more lists such as this one, specially during these times of increasing complexities and changes in healthcare. 

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