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Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says |
Modern Healthcare

Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Medical coders participating in an ICD-10 coding pilot produced accurate coding using the complex new system less than two-thirds of the time, according to a report by two healthcare IT industry groups.

Via Texas Medical Association
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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Texas Medical Association's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:39 PM

See full report: http://www.himss.org/files/HIMSSorg/Content/files/ICD-10_NPP_Outcomes_Report.pdf

 

TMA's position:

 

Put ICD-10 on permanent hold

 

The ICD-10 requirement is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 no later than Oct. 1, 2014. The punishment for noncompliance is severe: no payment for any medical services provided.

 

The number of diagnostic codes that physicians would be required to use under ICD-10 would grow from 13,500 to 69,000. The number of codes for inpatient procedures also would soar from 4,000 to 71,000. For example, the new system has 480 codes for a fractured knee cap — up from a grand total of two in ICD-9. Switching to ICD-10 will mandate extensive revision of physicians’ paper and electronic systems. Transition to the new system is expected to cost solo physicians as much as $83,000 each, and group practices of up to 10 doctors as much as $250,000.

 

The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s PQRS and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the diagnostic and procedure codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2015. It is being designed for use with electronic health records and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10. 

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 7:32 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says |
Modern Healthcare

Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Medical coders participating in an ICD-10 coding pilot produced accurate coding using the complex new system less than two-thirds of the time, according to a report by two healthcare IT industry groups.

Via Texas Medical Association
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

more...
Texas Medical Association's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:39 PM

See full report: http://www.himss.org/files/HIMSSorg/Content/files/ICD-10_NPP_Outcomes_Report.pdf

 

TMA's position:

 

Put ICD-10 on permanent hold

 

The ICD-10 requirement is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 no later than Oct. 1, 2014. The punishment for noncompliance is severe: no payment for any medical services provided.

 

The number of diagnostic codes that physicians would be required to use under ICD-10 would grow from 13,500 to 69,000. The number of codes for inpatient procedures also would soar from 4,000 to 71,000. For example, the new system has 480 codes for a fractured knee cap — up from a grand total of two in ICD-9. Switching to ICD-10 will mandate extensive revision of physicians’ paper and electronic systems. Transition to the new system is expected to cost solo physicians as much as $83,000 each, and group practices of up to 10 doctors as much as $250,000.

 

The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s PQRS and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the diagnostic and procedure codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2015. It is being designed for use with electronic health records and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10. 

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 7:32 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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State Government won't release financial data for study into whether ... - Herald Sun

State Government won't release financial data for study into whether ... - Herald Sun | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
State Government won't release financial data for study into whether ...
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2 ways to cut spinal surgery costs

2 ways to cut spinal surgery costs | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Spinal surgeries remain costly even as they increase in popularity, prompting clinicians and surgical center business managers to find ways to trim dollars off each procedure.
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

Negotiate outpatient surgery  costs upfront and prevent add-on costs to reduce cost of spinal surgeries

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Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says |
Modern Healthcare

Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Medical coders participating in an ICD-10 coding pilot produced accurate coding using the complex new system less than two-thirds of the time, according to a report by two healthcare IT industry groups.

Via Texas Medical Association
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

more...
Texas Medical Association's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:39 PM

See full report: http://www.himss.org/files/HIMSSorg/Content/files/ICD-10_NPP_Outcomes_Report.pdf

 

TMA's position:

 

Put ICD-10 on permanent hold

 

The ICD-10 requirement is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 no later than Oct. 1, 2014. The punishment for noncompliance is severe: no payment for any medical services provided.

 

The number of diagnostic codes that physicians would be required to use under ICD-10 would grow from 13,500 to 69,000. The number of codes for inpatient procedures also would soar from 4,000 to 71,000. For example, the new system has 480 codes for a fractured knee cap — up from a grand total of two in ICD-9. Switching to ICD-10 will mandate extensive revision of physicians’ paper and electronic systems. Transition to the new system is expected to cost solo physicians as much as $83,000 each, and group practices of up to 10 doctors as much as $250,000.

 

The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s PQRS and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the diagnostic and procedure codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2015. It is being designed for use with electronic health records and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10. 

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 7:34 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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Beaumont's new health system looks to compete on cost, quality ...

Beaumont's new health system looks to compete on cost, quality ... | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
"They know people will look at (hospital and physician) networks as a value proposition because they will be paying a higher percentage of those costs out of pocket." But consolidation to position for managed care contracting ...
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Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says |
Modern Healthcare

Accuracy of coding in ICD-10 pilot varies, report says | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
Medical coders participating in an ICD-10 coding pilot produced accurate coding using the complex new system less than two-thirds of the time, according to a report by two healthcare IT industry groups.

Via Texas Medical Association, Rajat Dhameja
more...
Texas Medical Association's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:39 PM

See full report: http://www.himss.org/files/HIMSSorg/Content/files/ICD-10_NPP_Outcomes_Report.pdf

 

TMA's position:

 

Put ICD-10 on permanent hold

 

The ICD-10 requirement is an excellent example of a costly regulation that will disrupt practice operations. ICD-10 is a 20-year-old boondoggle of a system that will help only health care researchers. All physicians, hospitals, providers, and insurance companies must shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 no later than Oct. 1, 2014. The punishment for noncompliance is severe: no payment for any medical services provided.

 

The number of diagnostic codes that physicians would be required to use under ICD-10 would grow from 13,500 to 69,000. The number of codes for inpatient procedures also would soar from 4,000 to 71,000. For example, the new system has 480 codes for a fractured knee cap — up from a grand total of two in ICD-9. Switching to ICD-10 will mandate extensive revision of physicians’ paper and electronic systems. Transition to the new system is expected to cost solo physicians as much as $83,000 each, and group practices of up to 10 doctors as much as $250,000.

 

The ICD-10 mandate will create significant burdens on the practice of medicine with no direct benefit to individual patient care. It is a huge weight to place on physicians when they face numerous other administrative hurdles, including implementing and achieving meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), meeting quality measures under Medicare’s PQRS and other programs, the impending creation of accountable care organizations in Medicare, and more. The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing EHRs in their practices.

 

ICD-10 is old technology developed during the 1980s and not designed to work in the current electronic world. A new version of the diagnostic and procedure codes, ICD-11, could come as early as 2015. It is being designed for use with electronic health records and the Internet, and should be more user-friendly than ICD-10. 

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 7:32 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

Rajat Dhameja's curator insight, June 14, 7:34 PM

October 1, 2014 and after, fractured knee cap will have 480 codes in ICD - 10, up from 2 in ICD- 9

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Medtronic to buy Covidien, move corporate office to Ireland

Medtronic - Covidien deal

Rajat Dhameja's insight:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-16/medtronic-seeks-wider-health-care-reach-in-covidien-deal.html

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103 ASC Administrators to Know - Becker's ASC Review

103 ASC Administrators to Know - Becker's ASC Review | Rajat Dhameja Healthcare Buzz | Scoop.it
103 ASC Administrators to Know
Becker's ASC Review
Joseph Colbert is administrator at North Coast Surgery Center in Oceanside, Calif., a joint venture between physician partners, Tri-City Medical Center and Surgical Care Affiliates.
Rajat Dhameja's insight:

It's great to see more lists of healthcare administrators as this one. for Ambulatory Care Administrators. We come across lists for best cities, best restaurants, the richest , most influential. We need more lists such as this one, specially during these times of increasing complexities and changes in healthcare. 

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