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Connect with your audience through storytelling – an interview with Samantha Starmer of REI | SlideShare Blog

Connect with your audience through storytelling – an interview with Samantha Starmer of REI | SlideShare Blog | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it
With so much information bombarding conference attendees during an event, it's easy to overwhelm and saturate an audience with facts, figures and data.
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Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En)
Digging Radio 2.0 for Good Solutions. How connected radios offer engaging audio experience and empower e-listeners communities when getting “smart” on the Networks
More info : www.innovative-broadcast-solutions.com
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World RADIO DAY Madrid 2013 Synthesis

Synthesis of World RADIO DAY Madrid 2013

Sintesis del Día Mundial de la Radio Madrid 2013
13/02/203


Homenaje internacional ' Tribute to Radio', Interesante Cara a Cara 'La Magia de la Radio', estudio 'Los Jóvenes y la Radio', gran debate 'Reinventar la radio' previo a la Gala de la Academia

· Organizadores: Actuonda, Academia Española de la Radio, Ayuntamiento de Pozuelo de Alarcón
· Patrocinadores Gold: CIRES21, Cristaliza, Audioemotion, Save Diffusion
· Con el apoyo nacional de AERC, FORTA, AERO, Instituto RTVE, ARU, Ocendi, Universidad Carlos 3 de Madrid, Tecnología 2.0, Know Media, Aire, Periodista Digital
· World Radio Day is an event supported by UNESCO and World Radio Day International Committee (AER, URTI, EBU/UER, ITU, ASBU, AIR, AMARC, AIBD, BNNRC, AUB, ABU and Spanish Radio Academy)

For more info, please contact Nicolas Moulard moulard@actuonda.com @Radio_20


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Help African Radio Journalists fight the spread of Ebola | with WFSJ Hirondelle AMARC via Indiegogo

Help African Radio Journalists fight the spread of Ebola | with WFSJ Hirondelle AMARC via Indiegogo | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it
Local radio journalists in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia need critical supplies


The World Federation of Science Journalists (WFSJ) in association with Hirondelle USA and the World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters (AMARC) created this fundraising campaign to help local radio stations and their staff in Ebola-affected regions. This is the first stage of a soon-to-be-launched international journalism training program initiated by the WFSJ. The program will contribute to bridging the communication gap among key stakeholders in the Ebola crisis, by positioning local media at the center of the communication channels and enhancing the use of credible information by the media.


Current Situation

The Ebola outbreak continues to threaten the economy and lives of many families in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.

Beyond the devastating effect of Ebola, poor communication has clearly heightened fear among the public, while potentially seeding confusion among scientists and journalists who report the outbreak. Until now, much of the official communication efforts on Ebola haven’t been very effective at reaching communities that exist largely in an information blackout.  There is a certain degree of mistrust between the local communities that have been hit hard by the virus and the various  agencies on the ground whose messages don’t always concur with local culture and idiom. Amongst other things, this led to the sad story of eight members of a team—including two journalists—trying to raise awareness about Ebola, being killed by villagers in Guinea. 

What we need

In many regions rural radio is the most trusted source of information for local communities.  But these local radios lack the tools to report accurately and timely in this chaotic situation. They need fuel and electricity to air their programs, telephone and voice recorders to carry out interviews, transportation to reach their news “sources” and the communities.


Hirondelle USA and AMARC in Western Africa will use the funds to buy much needed supplies and equipment that will be distributed amongst a range of local community and rural radio stations based in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. A list of beneficiary stations will be provided upon request.

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BBC launches WhatsApp Ebola service

BBC launches WhatsApp Ebola service | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

The BBC has launched an Ebola public health information service on WhatsApp, aimed at users of the service in West Africa.

The service will provide audio, text message alerts and images to help people get the latest public health information to combat the spread of Ebola in the region.

Content will be limited to three items a day, and the service will be in English and French.

In addition to the WhatsApp service, the BBC is offering a range of content on radio, online and TV, including special Ebola bulletins in several languages.

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BBC - BBC World Service launches Ebola radio network for West Africa - Media centre

The BBC World Service is launching special Ebola broadcasts for West Africa, starting today (Monday 22 September). Each evening shortwave transmissions to the region will be increased. There will be a round-up of news, concentrating on efforts to combat the virus - particularly to the three worst affected countries: Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

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Peter Horrocks, Director, BBC World Service Group says: "Lack of knowledge and myths about the disease are killing people as surely as Ebola is. Quality information from both within and outside the countries affected about how the risks of Ebola can be safely managed will save lives. The range of emergency activities on Ebola from the BBC World Service are in the finest traditions of the humanitarian instincts of our broadcasting.”

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We have started a radio program against Ebola | Oxfam

We have started a radio program against Ebola | Oxfam | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it
Ebola is devastating communities in West Africa. It has already killed almost half of the people it has infected. We are stepping up our response to the disease to try to slow down the spread of infection.


We are supplying water, hygiene equipment and sanitation to treatment and community care centers and boosting mass publication about the disease. We are also giving personal protective clothing to front line community health workers.

We are working in six districts in Sierra Leone and stepping up our prevention programs in Liberia, Senegal and Guinea Bissau. We have started a radio program advising people how to avoid catching Ebola and on what to do if it spreads in their community.

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NotreAfrik – Ebola – Les enfants de Sierra Leone reçoivent leurs cours par la radio

NotreAfrik – Ebola – Les enfants de Sierra Leone reçoivent leurs cours par la radio | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

En raison de la fermeture des écoles en Sierra Leone due à l’épidémie d’Ebola, l’UNICEF et d’ autres partenaires de développement dans le secteur de l’éducation aident le ministère de l’Éducation, de la Science et de la Technologie dans son récent projet de diffuser par radio des programmes d’enseignement à destination des enfants scolarisés de Sierra Leone.

Le programme « l’école à la radio » vise plus de 1,7 million d’ enfants scolarisés des niveaux maternelle, primaire et collège dans tous les districts du pays. Les leçons de matières ordinaires telles que Anglais, mathématiques, sciences sociales, éducation physique, compétences de la vie ou encore hygiène, entre autres, sont développées actuellement par des enseignants professionnels et livrés à domicile aux enfants par le biais d’un réseau de 41 stations de radio dans le pays, coordonnées par l’Association des journalistes de Sierra Leone (SLAJ) et le Réseau radiophonique indépendant (IRN) .

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Afrique - La Sierra Leone fait de la radio une arme contre Ebola

Afrique - La Sierra Leone fait de la radio une arme contre Ebola | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it
La radio est devenue un outil d’information et de communication essentiel en Sierra Leone, où moins de la moitié de la population sait lire. Pour lutter contre la propagation du virus Ebola, les autorités mobilisent animateurs et journalistes.


C’est par la radio que la plupart des Sierra-Léonais s'informent. Dans ce pays d'Afrique de l'Ouest, où près de 60 % des habitants sont analphabètes, lire la presse est réservée à une élite. La radio, qui compte plusieurs dizaines de stations émettant dans tout le pays, contre une seule chaîne de télévision, se retrouve donc en première ligne dans la lutte contre le virus Ebola.

Kenema, dans l’est du pays, est la ville la plus touchée par l'épidémie. À midi, les habitants se rassemblent autour d’un petit poste de radio portable pour écouter religieusement les dernières nouvelles. "Ebola est là, et son impact sur nous est réel ! C’est une maladie et elle se propage très vite", lance l’animateur sur un ton grave.

"La radio nous apprend ce qu’est vraiment la maladie. Ils nous disent que si l’on se retrouve avec un malade atteint d’Ebola, il faut l’emmener dans un centre de traitement d’Ebola", témoigne Sahrouna, un jeune habitant de Kenema.

Parce que les informations transmises sur le virus sont souvent vitales, le gouvernement sierra-léonais a décidé de mettre à contribution les animateurs et les journalistes des radios du pays. Rassemblés à Freetown, la capitale, pour une formation sur le virus Ebola, on leur rappelle que lutter contre les rumeurs fait partie de leur mission. Et notamment celle, selon laquelle un bain à l’eau salée permettrait d’éviter la maladie…

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Ebola radio brings hope in West Africa

Radio dominates in many parts of West Africa – and the medium has proved invaluable for communicating about Ebola in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Jane Labous reports

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Ebola-hit Sierra Leone launches school by radio

Ebola-hit Sierra Leone launches school by radio | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

Because of the Ebola epidemic, schools are closed in Sierra Leone, a country with about 2 million school-aged children. So as the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history continues to rage, government officials have launched a project to deliver school lessons to those kids over the airwaves.

For six days a week, Sierra Leone's children can listen to four-hour lessons on dozens of the country's radio stations, along with its only television channel, the AFP reported.

It's hardly a perfect solution, but it seems to be the best option for education officials: As the Conference of Principals of Secondary Schools's Sylvester Meheaux told the AFP, schools there probably won't open until early 2015 at the soonest.

A single mother named Fatima Sheriff, living in Freetown, told the AFP she was worried the school closures would hit young, school-aged girls the hardest as "the end of their educational dreams as the choice of the going into prostitution and other vices loom."

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Tackling Ebola, One Broadcast at a Time

Tackling Ebola, One Broadcast at a Time | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it
Health workers aren’t the only ones fighting Ebola -- so are radio journalists, hip-hop singers, and imams.


GUÉCKÉDOU, Guinea — Diallo Fatou Traoré stands at the entrance of a rural radio station, of which she is the director, and asks that everyone entering use a hand-washing station. In less tenuous times, such a request would be unfathomably rude. But here in Guinea's southeastern Forestière region, the heart of the current Ebola epidemic, extreme caution has become the norm

Traoré and her team of 18 journalists, technicians, and on-air presenters are probably not the first people who come to mind when thinking about those on the front lines of the battle against Ebola, but each have been deeply engaged in fighting the spread of the disease. "We had seven cases and four dead at the start, and people did not believe in Ebola," says Traoré, who recalls people calling into her station with personal theories and anecdotes. "We started interactive programming with a doctor answering questions and responding to phone calls, and the mentality changed."

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"Des radios contre Ebola" - Agence française de coopération médias

"Des radios contre Ebola" - Agence française de coopération médias | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

La nouvelle épidémie du virus Ebola qui sévit actuellement en Afrique de l’Ouest a déjà fait plus de 4 000 morts sur le continent africain. La progression du virus se poursuit et aucun vaccin efficace n’est pour le moment annoncé. 
Dans ce contexte, l’attachement des populations isolées à certaines pratiques rituelles est identifié comme un facteur de propagation avéré.

Afin d’appuyer les ONG et les gouvernements dans leurs actions de prévention, CFI – agence française de coopération médias – met en œuvre dans l’urgence un projet de renforcement des capacités des radios de proximité à informer efficacement sur Ebola, en coordination avec les autorités médicales, traditionnelles et religieuses. 

Des radios contre Ebola  est un projet de 150 000 € qui concerne 6 pays proches de la zone épidémique : Sénégal, Mali, Côte d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso, Togo et Bénin
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Ebola communication: What we've learned so far | Devex

Ebola communication: What we've learned so far | Devex | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

This week, a World Health Organization infectious diseases expert reported the death rate due to Ebola in West Africa has now climbed to 70 percent, higher than previous estimates. And by December, new cases could hit 10,000 a week.

For front-line medical workers, the projections couldn’t be grimmer. They are overwhelmed and their numbers are dwindling — Médecins Sans Frontières has already lost nine staff members to the epidemic — but reinforcements remain sparse.

For organizations involved in communication and awareness-raising campaigns, meanwhile, this situation means they need to be more aggressive and robust, and their messaging fool-proof.

We know many of them are on the ground, conducting door-to-door campaigns and spot radio announcements, putting up posters and distributing pamphlets to inform communities about the disease. Some have even resorted to using megaphones to reach people who choose to remain indoors, conduct skits in schools and communities via youth drama troupes. A few aid groups are even considering perceived viral forms of communication like music and video messaging led by former football player and now UNICEF ambassador David Beckham.

But are these campaigns actually working? Will the new plans be effective? It’s hard to tell at this point. Monitoring and evaluation activities, given the severity of the crisis, are rare, and most organizations lack the bandwidth to incorporate M&E in their daily workflow in West Africa.

Despite the chaos, there are a few lessons learned, which officials from different groups involved in social mobilization efforts to stem the spread of Ebola shared with Devex.

What works — and doesn’t

One relative surprise is that mobile messaging services are not making as much impact as expected. Ombretta Baggio, senior health communications officer at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, explained text messages are not being viewed in communities as trusted sources of information. Another detrimental factor is the high illiteracy rate in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

In Sierra Leone, Concern Worldwide found Ebola awareness paraphernalia, like posters that are being used to disseminate information about the virus and how it can be prevented, are “too graphic for children,” and decided to start developing a radio education program that would carry more “kid-friendly Ebola messages.”

Africare noticed in Liberia that keeping patients’ family members and loved ones in the “communication loop” dispels suspicions and mistrust in the system and health workers.


“We realized that while individuals with suspected cases were being collected from their home communities and taken to Ebola treatment units, updates or status reports about the patients' progress were not getting back to their families and loved ones,” Ernest Gaie, Africare country director in Monrovia, told Devex.

Collaboration among stakeholders and repeated messaging, organizations agree, are also crucial.

“Constant reinforcement of the messages and checking in with community volunteers have been key to making sure the messages stay real and at the forefront of everyone's thoughts and day-to-day activities,” Richard Parker, vice president for marketing and communications with U.S.-based nonprofit Project Concern International, told Devex.

One must be persistent as well, according to Ishmeal Charles, Healey International Relief Foundation’s program manager in Sierra Leone.

“In communities we've already provided some awareness programs, we need to tell them, tell them again, tell them, and tell them again, because this has to do with behavioral change, and changing people's behavior has to be on a constant engagement basis,” Charles told Devex. “Advocacy is a process. So to get people to follow the rules and change the practices we've been doing since we were born, it's a whole process of engaging them continuously.”

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Sierra Leone : la radio remplace les écoles fermées à cause d'Ebola

Sierra Leone : la radio remplace les écoles fermées à cause d'Ebola | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it
En Sierra Leone, la radio et la télévision permettent de remplacer, provisoirement, les écoles qui ont été fermées à cause de l’épidémie d’Ebola. Un programme de quatre heures par jour a été lancé le 7 octobre dernier sur 41 radios et sur la télévision nationale.
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Vestaradio's curator insight, October 23, 7:01 AM

Une nouvelle utilisation inattendue de la radio pour que les enfants de Sierra Leone puissent continuer à vivre et apprendre malgré l'épidémie... 

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Campaña Crowdfunding para recuperar Más Voces | ReMC Red de Medios Comunitarios

Campaña Crowdfunding para recuperar Más Voces | ReMC Red de Medios Comunitarios | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

Desde 2006 con el impulso de las emisoras de la Unión de Radios Libres y Comunitarias de Madrid (URCM) y con el apoyo de la Red de Medios Comunitarios (ReMC) se lanzó el proyecto informativo Más Voces.

Más Voces es un esfuerzo colectivo de radios sociales sin ánimo de lucro y movimientos sociales de diferentes lugares del mundo para…

Trabajar en la democratización de la información ofreciendo espacios radiofónicos a las voces que los grandes medios de comunicación suelen silenciar.

Compartir a través de redes radiofónicas un espacio informativo independiente sostenido con las acciones, ideas y opiniones que la sociedad civil genera.

Poner al servicio de las emisoras las diferentes producciones radiofónicas bajo los parámetros de informar, analizar, explicar y escuchar a los pueblos del mundo.

Pero en junio de 2014 el proyecto tuvo que parar, cerrar su ventana al mundo, porque no se consiguió sostener económicamente. Y decenas de radios libres y comunitarias que emitían y formaban parte del proyecto echaron de menos, junto a sus audiencias, su habitual espacio diario de 30 minutos de información crítica y de análisis. Así surgió un nuevo impulso para intentar volver a lanzar al “aire” las ondas informativas de Más Voces. Y nació la idea del crowdfunding. 15 mil euros podrían sostener un año el proyecto.

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Hackathons create burst of fresh digital ideas

Hackathons create burst of fresh digital ideas | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola Enterprises has hosted a series of hackathons, which are idea creation events aimed at discovering fresh digital concepts. The meetings are an excellent way to improve the ways that we and our retailers reach shoppers.
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BBC - Blogs - BBC Media Action - Using radio to respond to Ebola in Sierra Leone

BBC - Blogs - BBC Media Action - Using radio to respond to Ebola in Sierra Leone | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

How the BBC Media Action team in Freetown trained radio station managers from across the country to tackle fear and misinformation about the deadly Ebola virus.


For the past four years, the BBC Media Action team here in Sierra Leone has been building the skills of radio stations' producers and journalists across the country. We've trained community journalists on how to gather news, for example, helped them to develop new programmes and coached station managers on how to find new sources of revenue.

But never have we run a training workshop with such high stakes as the one we did this month. On 2 July in Freetown, we gathered together staff from 30 radio stations from across the country to learn how best to tackle the current outbreak of the Ebola virus.

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In Liberia, Volunteers Use Radio and Face-to-Face Interactions to Spread the Word about Ebola to Local Communities | Internews

In Liberia, Volunteers Use Radio and Face-to-Face Interactions to Spread the Word about Ebola to Local Communities | Internews | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

A community organization in Liberia, where health officials have recorded more than 2,400 Ebola deaths, is trying to fight the disease by informing local communities and stopping the spread of rumors and misinformation.

Community Action Against Ebola (CAAEB), an Internews subgrantee led by nurse Aaron Debah and Roosevelt Dolo, is made up of professional nurses, church members and other community members who spread information through radio programs and face-to-face interactions with the public.

Callers to educational radio programs broadcast on Voice of Gompa, HOT FM and Radio Kergeamahn expressed concern about denial that still exists in the country.

“According to many participants on the radio show, if we don’t accept the true existence of Ebola as a virus that kills fast and presently in Ganta and other parts of Liberia, we as a country will never be successful in the fight against Ebola,” said Debah.

As well as radio, CAAEB outreach workers go house-to-house and distribute flyers to educate the community about preventing the spread of Ebola and to reduce the stigma that Ebola survivors face when they return home.

Rumors and misinformation – that Ebola does not exist, that the government is behind its spread, that medicine is available but not being given, and many more  –  are exacerbating the problem and CAAEB volunteers work to inform the community with the facts about Ebola.

Amid all the misconceptions, Debah said many people are becoming aware of the existence of the virus and are practicing proper safety procedures.

Liberia is still struggling with other issues related to the spread of Ebola, such as a lack of food, medical supplies and protective gear and a need for clothing for Ebola victims, whose belongings have to be burned. There is also a need for care of children orphaned by the disease.

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Ebola virus: College radio in Sierra Leone fights against misinformation | Hirondelle USA

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is evolving rapidly and has been described by Doctors Without Borders as “out of control”.  In Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea in particular, the virus has found a naturally ally in impoverished, hard to reach communities.

Sierra Leone is now at the epicenter of the outbreak, and access to affected villages has been hampered not only by rain and poor roads, but also by rumor and fear.  In this context, radio has an essential role to play, providing information in local languages and engaging local leaders in helping people understand the steps to take to avoid spreading the disease.

Independent radios have been quick to react, working together to produce and broadcast programming that responds to the acute need for more information on the virus.  At Cotton Tree News-Radio Mt. Aureol at Fourah Bay College above the capital Freetown, a team of professional and student journalists are reporting on the virus and bringing together decision makers and members of national and local government in live interactive debates. Recent guests include representatives from the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, the Sierra Leone Red Cross Society, the Inter-religious Youth Council, and the Voice of Islam Radio.

Programs being broadcast are mostly straight forward fact based reporting, such as: The Ebola outbreak and partners involved in containing the epidemicCauses and prevention of EbolaTreatment Centers and kits for medical staff.  The radio has also explored themes such as the role of religious leaders in the fight against the Ebola disease and public perception about efforts to contain the Ebola virus, providing a platform for dialogue and interactivity and fulfilling its role as a teaching radio in the public service.

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Radio as an important source of accurate information about Ebola in West Africa - BBC Media Action - YouTube

Caroline Ford, regional director, Africa for BBC Media Action talks to BBC World News GMT about the importance of radio as a source of accurate information about Ebola in West Africa.

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CAT Radio Barming - La radio de un vendrellense ayuda a luchar contra el ébola en África

CAT Radio Barming - La radio de un vendrellense ayuda a luchar contra el ébola en África | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

El excantante del conocido grupo Lax’n’Busto Pemi Fortuny y su pareja, Yasmina Cánovas, siguen al detalle la crisis humanitaria que se vive en SierraLeona a causa del virus del ébola. Hasta el momento han fallecido en el país africano más de 700personas.En 2005, tres años después de que terminara la brutal guerra civil en el país que–entre 1991 y 2002– provocó más de 50.000 muertos y 2,5 millones de desplazados, Fortuny decidió impulsar un proyecto solidario al tiempo que comunicativo: una radio en Madina una localidad rural situada al norte del país, muy cerca de Liberia. Fue bautizada como CAT Radio Barming Cat Radio porque Catalunya Radio suministro material y Barming porque en el lenguaje local significa «nuestra».El objetivo era contribuir a la reconciliación de los bandos que se enfrentaron a la vez que mejorar las condiciones educativas y sanitarias de la zona gracias a las charlas que se emitían. La radio la escuchan cuatro millones de personas en un país que carece de electricidad por lo que no pueden conectar la tele pero sí una radio con pilas.

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In Sierra Leone, Journalists Support Ebola Information during Lockdown | Internews

In Sierra Leone, Journalists Support Ebola Information during Lockdown | Internews | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

When the President of Sierra Leone announced a national three-day lockdown on September 18, the Sierra Leone Association of Journalists (SLAJ) and the Independent Radio Network (IRN) sprang into action.

Most Sierra Leoneans complied with the order and stayed at home, tuning into their radios religiously.

During the 36-hour-3-day, broadcast marathon, over 25 guests were interviewed from the World Health Organization (WHO), Doctors Without Borders (MSF), task forces, operation centers, the Center for Disease Control (CDC), government ministries, religious organizations and a host of others. The voices of those staying at home had to be recorded on location because travel during the three days was severely restricted. Up to 40 radio stations participated from west to east and north to south.

“I'd say at this stage 100% of the population know that a deadly disease has struck Sierra Leone,” said Internews Media Development Consultant, Stephen Douglas, who has been working with journalists in the country during the Ebola crisis. “They may not know [everything about Ebola], but they know there's a disease in Sierra Leone, a disease that kills. I'd also say that radio has played a significant role in this goal. SLAJ and IRN were on air for 13 hours a day. They added to the sensitization and awareness tremendously.”

During the lockdown period, journalists followed sensitizing teams of volunteers from door-to-door, they followed burial teams, and they visited hospitals and treatment centers even in remote areas of the country.

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Cut off from school, children in Ebola-stricken Sierra Leone get lessons by radio

Cut off from school, children in Ebola-stricken Sierra Leone get lessons by radio | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

Because of the Ebola epidemic, schools are closed in Sierra Leone, a country with about 2 million school-aged children. So as the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history continues to rage, government officials have launched a project to deliver school lessons to those kids over the airwaves.

For six days a week, Sierra Leone's children can listen to four-hour lessons on dozens of the country's radio stations, along with its only television channel, the AFP reported.

It's hardly a perfect solution, but it seems to be the best option for education officials: As the Conference of Principals of Secondary Schools's Sylvester Meheaux told the AFP, schools there probably won't open until early 2015 at the soonest.

A single mother named Fatima Sheriff, living in Freetown, told the AFP she was worried the school closures would hit young, school-aged girls the hardest as "the end of their educational dreams as the choice of the going into prostitution and other vices loom."


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School on the radio: Using tech to teach kids during Ebola crisis

School on the radio: Using tech to teach kids during Ebola crisis | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

Schoolchildren in Sierra Leone are turning to remote schooling through mobile, radio and soon TV, as schools in the west African nation remain closed to combat the spread of the Ebola epidemic.

The disease that has spread at an alarming rate, primarily in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, has affected many families, and killed more than 4,000 people in Sierra Leone.

In a bid to contain the disease, the Sierra Leonean government has closed schools in the country to keep the spread of the virus as low as possible among children.

However, the government and parents alike are concerned that school closures will deprive children of their education, which is why the government is now turning to technology to help fill the void.

Launched this week, students now have the chance to keep up with their studies from their homes with the help of mobile phones, as well as radio, with help coming from UNICEF to maintain the programme.

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The unsung heroes raising Ebola awareness through rap

The unsung heroes raising Ebola awareness through rap | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it

Rappers might not be the most obvious line of defence against the growing Ebola epidemic, but as I heard at an event in London, United Kingdom, their role as positive agents of behavioural change can be profoundly influential and demands more attention. This unusual message was aired at ‘The West African Ebola outbreak: Gaps in governance and accountability’, a meeting convened by the Royal African Society last week (8 October). It brought together a panel of health and policy experts — including Peter Piot, who helped first identify the virus in 1976 — to discuss strategies for tackling the current epidemic and for bolstering countries’ capacity to deal with future crises. One topic to emerge was the importance of putting the spotlight on “local African heroes” engaged in fighting the epidemic. Another was, as Kandeh K. Yumkella, a UN undersecretary-general, put it, tackling “the lack of trust” that communities have in public health information on Ebola. One route to rebuilding people’s trust in public health messages on Ebola is to tap into the socially influential roles of musicians, rappers and community radio, said Carlos Chirinos, director of SOAS radio at the University of London, and a visiting professor at NYU Steinhardt in the United States, where he works on links between radio, music and social development in Africa and Latin America. “The biggest challenge to containing Ebola is public misinformation and fighting urban and rural myths about the disease,” he said. And music has a vital role to play here. - See more at: http://www.scidev.net/global/health/scidev-net-at-large/unsung-heroes-ebola-awareness-rap.html#sthash.yaQix8Df.dpuf

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Ebola myths: Sierra Leonean DJ tackles rumours and lies over the airwaves

Ebola myths: Sierra Leonean DJ tackles rumours and lies over the airwaves | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it
Amara Bangura says his weekly radio show is a crucial tool in helping to change attitudes towards the virus at community level


The Ebola outbreak was sparked by a bewitched aircraft that crashed in a remote part of Sierra Leone, casting a spell over three west African countries, but a heavily alcoholic drink called bitter Kola can cure the virus.

These are just two of the rumours dispelled on Amara Bangura’s weekly radio show, which is networked through BBC Media Action and broadcast on 35 stations across the country.

“You have to deal with the issues of myth, you have to deal with the issues of religion, you have to answer questions about prevention and how to stay safe,” said Bangura.

The presenter selects questions from thousands of text messages sent in from around the country and puts them to health experts and government officials. “Our radio programme has been very useful in helping people change their attitudes,” he said, noting that not all Sierra Leoneans are following guidelines aimed at preventing the spread of Ebola.

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The Enduring Power of Radio in the Digital Age | Mashable

The Enduring Power of Radio in the Digital Age | Mashable | Radio Hacktive (Fr-Es-En) | Scoop.it
World Radio Day reminds us not only that digital hasn't "killed the radio star," so to speak, but also that radio can help drive change around the world.

Despite the evolution of high-speed Internet and television's prevalence in today's culture, radio is still a very important and relevant medium — especially in developing nations. World Radio Day reminds us not only that digital hasn't "killed the radio star," so to speak, but also that radio can help drive change around the world.

1. 95% of the World's Population Uses Radio
2. Most Households in Developing Nations Have Radio
3. Radio Is the Only News Medium on the Rise in Russia Since 20084. Radio Signals Are More Reliable5. AM/FM Still More Popular Than Online Streaming


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