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Following global developments in the radio space
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Make DAB standard in all cars

Not enough car manufacturers are taking the digital radio switchover seriously. 


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Euro-Chip boost for digital radio

Euro-Chip boost for digital radio | Radio Futures | Scoop.it

GENEVA, 14 NOVEMBER 2012

 

 

The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) has launched a campaign for all new radios and mobile devices to be fitted with a ‘Euro-Chip’, which will give Digital Radio vital impetus and a surer future in Europe.

 

Euro-Chip integrates the main radio standards, such as digital (DAB/DAB+/DMB) and analogue (FM), into one universal radio receiver, overcoming incompatibilities and bringing important benefits to broadcasters, manufacturers and consumers.

 

Owners of any device containing a live Euro-Chip – including smartphones and tablets – can enjoy cost-free broadcast reception, even as they cross international borders or pass between digital and analogue signals.

 

Crucially, Euro-Chipped smartphones will draw younger people to radio; EBU research consistently confirms that it is the device, and not the delivery system, that matters most to them.

The technology will also enhance radio’s role as the optimum communications medium in the event of networks failure, during for instance, natural disasters; at these pressured times, broadcast networks usually continue to work.

 

The EBU wants action on several levels:

 

• Although many devices have been fitted with a radio chip, dormant chips must be activated.
• Radio chip tools should be open and accessible for creative minds to develop new applications.
• Any future radios and smart devices must contain active Euro-Chips when they reach the shelves.

 

To this end, the EBU will talk to key stakeholders, such as carmakers, legislators and electronics manufacturers, to spread universal awareness of the huge opportunity that Euro-Chip represents.

 

EBU President Jean-Paul Philippot said: “Radio is extremely popular in Europe, but it has not enjoyed the same momentum as television, notably in the consumer electronics sphere. We want to send a clear signal that the EBU is determined to make radio a key part of Europe’s digital future.”

 

The EBU Executive Board has agreed a declaration in support of Euro-Chip, which lists the reasons why Euro-Chip is essential:

 

• Efficient network use: Euro-Chip eases pressure on mobile broadband networks while making full use of spectrum allocations for digital and analogue radio.

• Cost-free listening: In mobile phones, Euro-Chip enables audiences to receive broadcast services everywhere at no incremental cost. Consumers will not need to pay for broadband reception of free-to-air radio services.

• An Internal Market-friendly device: future-proof and interoperable, Euro-Chip enables radio reception in dozens of countries.

• Huge potential for innovative radio services: access to radio chips and hybrid radio services will engender new business models, creative opportunities and audience interaction.

• Enhanced public safety: Radio is the most resilient communications medium in natural disasters and national emergencies, a feature that Euro-Chip will enhance by increasing radio’s reach. Euro-Chip will also boost road safety in Europe by simplifying the delivery of real-time, language-independent traffic information about local and cross-border conditions.

 

BEN STEWARD, Communications Officer,
T +41 (0)22 717 2213
M +41 (0)79 244 6535
E steward@ebu.ch

 

ABOUT THE EUROPEAN BROADCASTING UNION (EBU)


The EBU is the world's foremost alliance of public service media organizations, with Members in 56 countries in Europe and beyond.


The EBU's mission is to defend the interests of public service media and to promote their indispensible contribution to modern society. It is the point of reference for industry knowledge and expertise.


The EBU operates EUROVISION, the media industry's premier distributor and producer of top quality live sport and news, as well as entertainment, culture and music content.
The EUROVISION satellite and fibre network is the largest and most reliable in the world directly plugged in to public service media everywhere.


web: www.ebu.ch - www.eurovision.com
twitter: @EBU_Eurovision #ebu #eurovision


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5 things we have learnt about radio

5 things we have learnt about radio | Radio Futures | Scoop.it

More than 100 delegates have attended two key Eurovision meetings about the future of radio. Multimedia Meets Radio took place in Turin, in September, and was followed by the Digital Radio Conference in October.

 

The former is a showcase for excellence in interactive and multimedia content, while the latter event focuses much more on the big strategic questions about the future of the medium.

 

Here are five core lessons gleaned from both conferences.

 

 

1. Digital Radio has passed the tipping point

 

The BBC’s outgoing Director of Audio and Music, Tim Davie, told the Digital Radio Conference that, “Now is the time to focus on the 'certainty' of a hybrid digital future for radio, because the European digital radio project has passed the tipping point.”

 

There is a lot of positive news from individual markets, including the Danish parliament’s recent decision to close the FM band by the end of 2019, if by that time half of all radio listening has migrated to digital platforms. What is new is that for the first time the industry is communicating a common vision of radio’s future.

 

In Brussels, Tim Davie and the Director-General of Deutschlandradio, Willi Steul, aligned their organizations behind an initiative to accelerate the production of multi-standard radio chips. The Euro-Chip will benefit broadcasters, manufacturers and above all, consumers across Europe.

 

When installed into mobile phones the Euro-Chip ensures that consumers, who are often struggling under the cost of expensive online plans, could receive zero-cost radio broadcast services anywhere.

 

Consumers also benefit by purchasing future-proofed receivers that will work wherever they are in Europe. Manufacturers will achieve economies of scale.

 

 

2. New formats are being created for new platforms

 

Content producers are placing a greater emphasis on the specific needs of different platforms. Gone are the days when POPE stood for Produce Once and Publish Everywhere.

 

A good example comes from Swedish Radio’s trailblazing partnership with Spotify. The music streaming service is very popular with youth listeners, many of whom are no longer tuning into traditional radio.

 

Swedish Radio is trying to recapture that by making comedy and other speech content available on Spotify. Since most songs last about 4 minutes, they concluded that this would be the ideal length of the comedy clips.

 

Initial feedback has been very encouraging.

 

Another good example comes from Bulgaria. Binar is an online station that targets young Bulgarians with personalised music channels and six hours of live video.

 

 

3. Binaural will soon deliver a personalized 5.1 experience.

 

Radio is embracing multimedia content, but it remains a medium of sound. Indeed, new technologies are offering broadcasters fresh opportunities for developing audio services.

 

Work underway at the EBU and elsewhere on binaural listening. Radio France presented their project in Turin.

 

Binaural audio files mimic the directional frequency filters created by the shape of the human ear to offer an immersive, surround-sound effect using only stereo's two audio channels.The effect is like having an orchestra inside your head, but there are are still a number of hurdles to overcome before broadcasters are able to offer it to mass audiences.

 

The current technological limitations mean that since we all have different shape heads and ears, each individual listener requires bespoke headphones.

 

When the service is fully developed audiences will have access to a wealth of content as broadcasters like Radio France host large archive of 5.1 audio files, which are seldom used. The aim of their binaural project is to convert these recordings for the benefit of music lovers.

 

 

4. We are not re-inventing radio, just future-proofing it

 

One of radio’s traditional strengths is mobility - you can pretty much listen to it wherever you are and whatever you are doing. Radio even had a back channel before the Internet popularized the term and phone-in programmes are still one of the most genuinely interactive formats.

 

What speakers showed us in Turin and Brussels is radio’s digital hybrid future is not about re-inventing radio, but building on those traditional strengths. Multimedia content is “glanceable” – it complements the audio – and digital radio solves problems like multipath distortion, which makes it better for cars than FM.

 

RTS En Ligne Directe uses social media and a neat smartphone app to make phone-in shows even more interactive. DIY.FM from Switzerland allows listeners to create their own personalized radio channel.

 

 

5. Programmes about social issues can be popular with youth audiences.

 

One of the highlights of the conference in Turin was a presentation from Armenia about Lyunse, a current affairs programme aimed at young adults. The BBC’s Brett Spencer tweeted, “This presentation about radio in Armenia is the most fascinating thing I have seen across the two days.”

 

Lyunse combines audio and video content with 'happenings' to engage with young people on social and environmental issues. It is not only innovative, but also it takes risks as much of the reporting is about environmental and other activism.

 

Gohar Adamyan, one of the journalists responsible for Lyunse, is now working with the EBU to create a European portal for public service, multimedia content that targets youth audiences.


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Radio bosses bullish on DAB/DAB+

Radio bosses bullish on DAB/DAB+ | Radio Futures | Scoop.it

DAB and DAB+ are the future for European digital radio, according to key figures in the industry who addressed the Radiodays Europe conference in Berlin. Sessions focused on the move towards turning off analogue services and the possibilities for hybrid radios combining digital broadcasting and the internet.


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radiomike's curator insight, March 25, 2013 11:11 AM

The process of building a digital future for radio is gathering real momentum in Europe thanks to events like #RDE and initiatives like #Euro-Chip -

 

http://www3.ebu.ch/files/live/sites/ebu/files/Programming/Radio/Digital%20Radio/FAQ's%20EURO-CHIP.pdf

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Euro-Chip boost for digital radio

Euro-Chip boost for digital radio | Radio Futures | Scoop.it

GENEVA, 14 NOVEMBER 2012

 

 

The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) has launched a campaign for all new radios and mobile devices to be fitted with a ‘Euro-Chip’, which will give Digital Radio vital impetus and a surer future in Europe.

 

Euro-Chip integrates the main radio standards, such as digital (DAB/DAB+/DMB) and analogue (FM), into one universal radio receiver, overcoming incompatibilities and bringing important benefits to broadcasters, manufacturers and consumers.

 

Owners of any device containing a live Euro-Chip – including smartphones and tablets – can enjoy cost-free broadcast reception, even as they cross international borders or pass between digital and analogue signals.

 

Crucially, Euro-Chipped smartphones will draw younger people to radio; EBU research consistently confirms that it is the device, and not the delivery system, that matters most to them.

The technology will also enhance radio’s role as the optimum communications medium in the event of networks failure, during for instance, natural disasters; at these pressured times, broadcast networks usually continue to work.

 

The EBU wants action on several levels:

 

• Although many devices have been fitted with a radio chip, dormant chips must be activated.
• Radio chip tools should be open and accessible for creative minds to develop new applications.
• Any future radios and smart devices must contain active Euro-Chips when they reach the shelves.

 

To this end, the EBU will talk to key stakeholders, such as carmakers, legislators and electronics manufacturers, to spread universal awareness of the huge opportunity that Euro-Chip represents.

 

EBU President Jean-Paul Philippot said: “Radio is extremely popular in Europe, but it has not enjoyed the same momentum as television, notably in the consumer electronics sphere. We want to send a clear signal that the EBU is determined to make radio a key part of Europe’s digital future.”

 

The EBU Executive Board has agreed a declaration in support of Euro-Chip, which lists the reasons why Euro-Chip is essential:

 

• Efficient network use: Euro-Chip eases pressure on mobile broadband networks while making full use of spectrum allocations for digital and analogue radio.

• Cost-free listening: In mobile phones, Euro-Chip enables audiences to receive broadcast services everywhere at no incremental cost. Consumers will not need to pay for broadband reception of free-to-air radio services.

• An Internal Market-friendly device: future-proof and interoperable, Euro-Chip enables radio reception in dozens of countries.

• Huge potential for innovative radio services: access to radio chips and hybrid radio services will engender new business models, creative opportunities and audience interaction.

• Enhanced public safety: Radio is the most resilient communications medium in natural disasters and national emergencies, a feature that Euro-Chip will enhance by increasing radio’s reach. Euro-Chip will also boost road safety in Europe by simplifying the delivery of real-time, language-independent traffic information about local and cross-border conditions.

 

BEN STEWARD, Communications Officer,
T +41 (0)22 717 2213
M +41 (0)79 244 6535
E steward@ebu.ch

 

ABOUT THE EUROPEAN BROADCASTING UNION (EBU)


The EBU is the world's foremost alliance of public service media organizations, with Members in 56 countries in Europe and beyond.


The EBU's mission is to defend the interests of public service media and to promote their indispensible contribution to modern society. It is the point of reference for industry knowledge and expertise.


The EBU operates EUROVISION, the media industry's premier distributor and producer of top quality live sport and news, as well as entertainment, culture and music content.
The EUROVISION satellite and fibre network is the largest and most reliable in the world directly plugged in to public service media everywhere.


web: www.ebu.ch - www.eurovision.com
twitter: @EBU_Eurovision #ebu #eurovision


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UK government to announce switchover decision in 2013

At the Drive 2 Digital conference held by Digital Radio UK at the BBC's new broadcasting house, Broadcast Minister Ed Vaizey announced the countdown to radio switchover now had inevitable momentum and that government would announce a decision on radio switchover in 2013.


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