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ROBERT BUCKLAND: Justice found in a moving victims event

ROBERT BUCKLAND: Justice found in a moving victims event | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
After nearly 20 years working in the criminal justice system, one of the common themes that emerged from the many cases I handled centred on the role of the victim.
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GRETCHEN RUBIN> Happiness Through Fixing Small Things

GRETCHEN RUBIN> Happiness Through Fixing Small Things | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

In crime-fighting, the broken windows theory holds that signs of vandalism and petty crime foster more crime and anti-social behavior; fix problems like broken windows, graffiti, or trash when they’re small, and people will behave better and remain in their neighborhoods.

 

This theory is controversial, but whether or not it’s true in a municipal context, I’ve been trying to apply it in my own home, by trying to do a better job of fixing small things right away.

 

Just yesterday, a light bulb burned out in my office. My instinct would be to put up with this for weeks, while half-heartedly reminding myself to replace the bulb, to little effect; instead, this morning, I marched myself over to the closet where we keep light-bulbs, grabbed one, and swapped them out.

 

This issue is familiar to me. In college, my roommate and I would joke about the fact that we were the kind of people who, when some very necessary light-bulb in the living room burned out, would just resignedly say to each other, “Oh, well, now we have to learn to live without that light-bulb.” It took us forever to take care of those kinds of tasks.

 

Just the other morning, I got a ridiculous sense of accomplishment from this small act. And now it’s done, and won’t consume any more precious mental energy.

 

I find that when the little things in my home are out of order, I feel restless, anxious, and overwhelmed. When I take care of the little things, I feel more ready to tackle the large things.

 

How about you? Do you find that taking care of seemingly inconsequential tasks makes you feel happier and calmer? Am I the only one who has this strange resistance to light-bulb replacement?

  

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A Victim Treats His Mugger Right : NPR

Julio Diaz ends his daily subway commute one stop early, just so he can eat at his favorite diner. One evening, his routine was broken when a teenage mugger took his wallet at knifepoint. But neither of them could have predicted what happened next.
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DailyGood: Toss Productivity Out, by Leo Babauta

DailyGood: Toss Productivity Out, by Leo Babauta | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

For at least a couple of years, Zen Habits was one of the top productivity blogs, dispensing productivity tips for a nominal fee (your reading time).

 

I’d like to think I helped people move closer to their dreams, but today I have different advice:

Toss productivity advice out the window.

Most of it is well-meaning, but the advice is wrong for a simple reason: it’s meant to squeeze the most productivity out of every day, instead of making your days better.

 

Imagine instead of cranking out a lot of widgets, you made space for what’s important. Imagine that you worked slower instead of faster, and enjoyed your work. Imagine a world where people matter more than profits.

 

If any of that appeals to you, let’s look at some traditional productivity advice, and see why we should just toss them out...

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Oregon Executions to Be Blocked by Gov. Kitzhaber

Oregon Executions to Be Blocked by Gov. Kitzhaber | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Gov. John Kitzhaber said he would halt a scheduled execution and allow no others during his time in office.

 

Governor Kitzhaber said his decision was rooted in policy and personal views. He noted he had taken an oath as a physician to “never do harm.” Asked with whom he had consulted, he said, “Mostly myself.”

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Mike Robbins: 5 Ways to Tame Your Inner Critic

Mike Robbins: 5 Ways to Tame Your Inner Critic | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

 

 1) Give people the benefit of the doubt. Most of the time people have good intentions. Many of us, myself included, have been trained to be cautious and suspicious of others, even seeing this as an important and effective skill in life and business. However, we almost always get what we expect from people, so the more often we give people the benefit of the doubt, the more often they will prove us "right," and the less often we will waste our precious time and energy on cynicism, suspicion and judgment.

 

2) Don't take things personally. One of my favorite sayings is, "You wouldn't worry about what other people think about you so much, if you realized how little they actually did." The truth is that most people are focused on themselves much more than on us. Too often in life, we take things personally that have nothing to do with us. This doesn't mean we let people walk all over us or treat us in disrespectful or hurtful ways (it can be important for us to speak up and push back at times in life). However, when we stop taking things so personally, we liberate ourselves from needless upset, defensiveness and conflict.

 

3) Look for the good. Another way to say what I mentioned above about getting what we expect from other people, is that we almost always find what we look for. If you want to find some things about me that you don't like, consider obnoxious, or get on your nerves -- just look for them, I'm sure you'll come up with some. On the flip side, if you want to find some of my best qualities and things you appreciate about me, just look for those -- they are there too. As Werner Erhard said, "In every human being there is both garbage and gold, it's up to us to choose what we pay attention to." Looking for the good in others (as well as in life and in ourselves), is one of the best ways to find things to appreciate and be grateful for.

 

4) Seek first to understand. Often when we're frustrated, annoyed or in conflict with another person (or group of people), we don't feel seen, heard, or understood. As challenging and painful as this can be, one of the best things we can do is to shift our attention from trying to get other people to understand us (or being irritated that it seems like they don't), is to seek to understand the other person (or people) involved in an authentic way. This can be difficult, especially when the situation or conflict is very personal and emotional to us. However, seeking to understand is one of the best ways for us to liberate ourselves from the grip of criticism and judgment, and often helps shift the dynamic of the entire thing. Being curious, understanding and even empathetic of another person and their perspective or feelings doesn't mean we agree with them, it simply allows us to get into their world and see where they're coming from -- which is essential to letting go of judgment, connecting with them and ultimately resolving the conflict.

 

5) Be gentle with others (and especially with yourself).
Being gentle is the opposite of being critical. When we're gentle, we're compassionate, kind and loving. We may not like, agree with, or totally understand what someone has done (or why), but we can be gentle in how we respond and engage with them. Being gentle isn't about condoning or appeasing anyone or anything, it's about having a true sense of empathy and perspective. And, the most important place for us to bring a sense of gentleness is to ourselves. Many of us have a tendency to be hyper self-critical. Sadly, some of the harshest criticism we dole out in life is aimed right at us. Another great saying I love is, "We don't see people as they are, we see them as we are." As we alter how we relate to ourselves, our relationship to everyone else and to the world around us is altered in a fundamental way.

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Trev Bundy: Prosecutor Candidates Support ‘Restorative Justice’

Trev Bundy: Prosecutor Candidates Support ‘Restorative Justice’ | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
“Restorative justice,” an alternative to punishment for violent criminals, has gained backing in San Francisco, even among some candidates for district attorney.

 

Often, candidates for a county’s top law enforcement office compete to show who can be toughest on crime. But San Francisco has a history of freethinking district attorneys — Terence Hallinan, who held the office from 1996 to 2004, advocated the legalization of marijuana and prostitution — and restorative justice has become a buzzword in this year’s five-way race.

 

David Onek, a lawyer, a former police commissioner and founder of the Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice, has led the charge, making incarceration alternatives and restorative justice the centerpiece of his campaign.

 

“Do you know what happens when you’re locked up?” he said. “You sleep all day and watch daytime TV. You’re watching Jerry Springer, and someone feeds you three hot meals a day. Admitting what you did, confronting your actions, hearing from a victim about the impact that things have had on them, that’s tough.”

 

Mr. Onek said he would start by using restorative justice techniques broadly in the district attorney’s juvenile division, in an attempt to steer young offenders away from jail.

 

George Gascón, the former police chief who was appointed district attorney in January when his predecessor, Kamala Harris, ascended to state attorney general, has embraced the cause as well. That has raised some eyebrows, as Mr. Gascón, the presumptive favorite in the race, is considered to be well to the right on San Francisco’s left-leaning political spectrum.

 

Mr. Gascón noted in a recent interview that his office already oversees restorative programs like “neighborhood courts,” where victims and community members can weigh in on consequences for low-level offenders.

 

A third candidate, Sharmin Bock, a 22-year Alameda County prosecutor, is also promoting the concept.

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Harvard University’s Most Popular Course: Positive Psychology

Harvard University’s Most Popular Course: Positive Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Dr. Tal Ben-Shahar taught Harvard University’s most popular course: a course on Positive Psychology; that is, he taught his students how to be happy.
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Paul Zak: Trust, morality -- and oxytocin | Video on TED.com

TED Talks What drives our desire to behave morally? Neuroeconomist Paul Zak shows why he believes oxytocin (he calls it "the moral molecule") is responsible for trust, empathy and other feelings that help build a stable society.
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“People Who Are Loveable Do Better": Edgar Cahn and the Economics of Empathy | Ashoka - Innovators for the Public

“People Who Are Loveable Do Better": Edgar Cahn and the Economics of Empathy | Ashoka - Innovators for the Public | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Ashoka recently talked to Cahn as part of an on-going series of interviews designed to explore what empathy is all about, and to uncover specific strategies for cultivating it.

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John Lash:The World as You See it, in 500 Years

John Lash:The World as You See it, in 500 Years | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Imagine the world you would like to see in a year. Now imagine the world in five years, then 10, 20, 50, 100, and finally 500. Take some time with each increment.

 

This past year I have spent a lot of time trying to create the world I want to live in, and I have met many people with the same desire, though they do not always put it in the same words. I have interacted with advocates of restorative circles, nonviolent communication (NVC), alternatives to violence, and many others interested in peace making.

 

I first heard the phrase “the world I want to live in” from Jim Manske, one of my NVC teachers. He led a group in this exercise as part of Compassionate Leadership, a series of trainings and retreats that uses NVC and other strategies for helping people become “leaderful” in their lives and communities.

One year and five were straightforward for me. I have specific goals that involve school, work and my personal life. It was even easy to go a little further, because 10 or 20 years fall within my expected lifetime. Interestingly, I found these frames limiting as well, because I seemed to stay focused on my personal life.

 

As I moved further and further into the future my dreams became bigger and less focused on myself. I reached a time when I would be gone. I saw a world with plenty to eat for everyone, with peace abounding, and other visionary goals.

 

By far my strongest vision was of a world without prisons. I had no idea how it would be possible, but I imagined it anyway. Why not? Five hundred years from now, I and everyone I know will long be dust. It appealed to me to imagine that prisons and all the suffering that takes place in them would be dust as well.

 

Then Jim pulled a dirty trick on us. He asked us what we could do now to make these things reality. What could I do to achieve my own goals while simultaneously contributing to the world of 100 and even 500 years from now? It was difficult to imagine my actions now having an effect so far in the future. It seemed absurd, but in fact that is all the future is made of. Our actions now determine the world that will exist then.

 

What could I do to create a world where prisons no longer exist, and is it lunacy to even think that such a thing is possible? I do not think so. I can look at the present world and see efforts to make my vision true. One area where it is happening is in juvenile justice. Consider the youth courts of New Zealand.

In 1989 New Zealand passed The Children, Young Persons and Their Families Act. Its express purpose was, “’to promote the wellbeing of children, young persons, and their families and family groups.’ The Act thus seeks to empower families and communities, rather than professionals, in deciding the best measures to respond to offending behavior in children and young people.” This is a quote from Restorative Justice Online, a project of Prison Fellowship International and its Centre for Justice and Reconciliation.

 

The site also has a recent op-ed from a judge in New Zealand that discusses the lessons learned from this effort and how it might look if applied to the adult system. The judge, Fred McElrea, writes that by making family group conferencing (the restorative system used in lieu of courts) the legal default position of the state, most cases were resolved without any court appearance. He also points out the importance of victim participation and continuing monitoring of the resolution agreed upon in order to maintain the credibility of the system. New Zealand is just one of a growing number of countries that are adapting to restorative justice approaches including Australia, Canada and Brazil.

 

Looking at this picture gives me hope that we in the United States can progress as well, to a system that integrates all members of society into the solutions needed to address harm. Just as in other countries, these efforts are beginning to take root here, and it is my dream that one day they will spread to the entire criminal justice system.

 

I realize that I may not see this dream realized, but I know that I can begin to do my part now. How about you?

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» How Do “Flourishers” Flourish? - Adventures in Positive Psychology

» How Do “Flourishers” Flourish? - Adventures in Positive Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
A flourishing person is someone who experiences positive emotions, excels in daily life, and is a contributing and productive member of society. In other words, they consistently feel good and do good.

 

The article shares six pleasant activities that can boost positive emotions. The “flourishers” experienced higher levels of positive emotions during these activities:

 

Helping

Interacting With Others

Playing and Amusement

Learning and Curiousity

Spiritual Activity

Exercising

 

As you go through your day, work to observe and be aware of your emotional reactions to different situations and experiences. Determine what activities, people, and places elicit the greatest positivity for you, and incorporate more of this into your life.

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raymondo's comment, December 2, 2011 10:24 PM
Hi Kate, positivity plus Happiness & Wellbeing is an Excellent mix.

With Warmth, Raymondo
Senzeni Katywa's curator insight, May 31, 2014 7:15 AM

Our well-being is is dependant on the way we live our lives. People who live stable lives with their families and have stable jobs are generally known to live more happier lives. 

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James Livingston» Americans, Thou Shalt Shop and Spend for the Planet

James Livingston» Americans, Thou Shalt Shop and Spend for the Planet | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

I'm intrigued by this thesis and wonder what you think....

 

-Jim

 

Your desire to buy things isn't turning the earth into a landfill. In fact, consumers have led the fight against two pressing environmental threats: fossil fuels and industrialized food.

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File, fax, and feel | OdeWire

File, fax, and feel | OdeWire | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

by John Kinyon

 

However daunting the process may be, openly sharing emotions in the workplace makes good sense—and may even boost prosperity.

 

Parameters of “professional behavior” in today’s workplaces vary, but basic ground rules remain. Most rules, implicit or explicit, emphasize self-control. While “on the clock,” we’re expected to stay on-task and distance ourselves from personal feelings or needs. Some workplaces more casual and less hierarchical. “Transparency” is in, yet no matter how laid-back or buttoned up the work culture, sharing emotions—especially intense or “negative” emotions—is usually discouraged among colleagues.

 

It takes time (and therefore money) to process feelings in the workplace. Throwing resources into a hazy effort to “bring feelings into the open” has uncertain payoff and may even make things worse. Little wonder, then, that many professionals choose to avoid conflict and conceal their emotions (at least while at work). Feeling powerless to resolve a tense situation on the job, they simply focus the best they can to get their own work done.

Despite this tendency, most managers and business owners would probably agree that interpersonal conflict and breakdowns in communication negatively affect the bottom line. However daunting the process may be, openly addressing feelings among colleagues makes good sense, and may boost an organization’s overall prosperity. Candid talk about feelings can help increase productivity, but success often hinges on distinguishing feelings.

 

One key distinction is the difference between thoughts and feelings. What is the difference between the two? For me, a thought is a belief; a story or mini-story that I reflexively create about others. Identifying and articulating what we feel can be tricky. It is all too easy to mix together thoughts and feelings, or to confuse the two.

For example, after a few interactions with a fictional person I’ll call Joe, I might say to myself, “I feel that Joe is unreliable.” Even though the word “feeling” is in the sentence, it conveys more about my thinking than how I am feeling. I could also say, “I feel betrayed by Joe,” or “I feel let down.” However, these sentences also convey more thought than feeling about Joe.

 

If I wanted to describe what I would call feelings about Joe, I might say that I am feeling worried and concerned, or perhaps disappointed, saddened or discouraged. Notice that these words point to internal, bodily sensations and experience. Also, the word “unreliable” is an indirect expression of unmet needs. What I am really saying is, “My needs for reliability and trust are not met for me by the behaviors I’ve experienced with Joe or heard about him.” If I wanted to express my feelings to Joe using these distinctions, I could say something like:

 

“Joe, I noticed that you finished your last two projects a few weeks after their due dates. I am feeling panicked about how we are going to meet our next deadline and also frustrated that our team keeps falling behind schedule. I need to make sure that we can fulfill our promise to our clients and deliver this project next month. Can we talk about ways that you and I can work together to ensure that the project gets finished in time?”

 

Notice how I describe my feelings separate from thoughts and then link those feelings to needs. Another way to express my feelings to Joe could be, “I feel frustrated because I want to be able to trust that things will get done in our work together.” Connecting my feelings to needs—and making a clear request—can make it easier for Joe to hear me, and less likely that he will get defensive or perceive blame or criticism.

 

Talking about feelings in the workplace may not always be what you want to do, but there are ways to do it that can make the process much more likely to be successful.

 

Are you experiencing a conflict with someone at work that you think might be helped if you were able to express your feelings? If so, what are you feeling that is not a thought or “story” about this person? What needs of yours are not being met related to those feelings? How might you express those feelings and needs to this person, and also be clear about what you’d like from them?

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Infants prefer a nasty moose if it punishes an unhelpful elephant | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine

Infants prefer a nasty moose if it punishes an unhelpful elephant | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Below is a snippet from a recent article at Discovermagazine.com  I'm intrigued by the assertion that the baby's impulse emerges from a moral judgment.  It seems valid to also consider this from an NVC consciousness point of view, that the baby reacts because he/she values needs for support or safety, thus the preference could emerge from a value judgment rather than a moral judgment.  What do you think?

 

-Jim

 

If you saw someone punching a stranger in the street, you might think poorly of them. But if you found out that the stranger had slept with the assailant’s partner, had kicked a kitten, or was Justin Bieber, you might think differently about the situation. You might even applaud the punch-thrower.


When we make moral judgments, we do so subtly and selectively. We recognise that explicitly antisocial acts can seem appropriate in the right circumstances. We know that the enemy of our enemy can be our friend. Now, Kiley Hamlin from the University of British Columbia has shown that this capacity for finer social appraisals dates back to infancy – we develop it somewhere between our fifth and eighth months of life.


Hamlin, formerly at Yale University, has a long pedigree in this line of research. Together with Karen Wynn and Paul Bloom, she showed that infants prefer a person who helps others over someone who hinders, even from the tender age of three months. These experiments also showed that infants expect others to behave in the same way – approaching those who help them and avoiding those who harm them. Now, Hamlin has shown that our infant brains can cope with much more nuance than that.

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Jordan Armstrong: Surrey program keeps repeat-offender rates low

Jordan Armstrong:  Surrey program keeps repeat-offender rates low | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

It’s justice, Surrey style.  (Surrey is a suburb of Vancouver, BC, Canada.)


Surrey’s restorative justice program brings select offenders, victims, the community and police together to discuss a resolution to a crime.
The program’s been in place since 2008 and a review conducted earlier this year found that it’s working.


“Ninety-four per cent of the participants in the program complete it, with a further indicator of low repeat offender rates – that is, that they’re less likely to be charged as compared to others that have not participated in the program.”


RCMP Insp. Bob Couture adds the program also saves money, as it keeps offenders out of our busy court system.

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In Parts of the South, a Shortage of Occupy Energy

In Parts of the South, a Shortage of Occupy Energy | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

The Occupy movement has been in the news a lot the last few days. The latest developments include the evictions of protesters around the country, even in New York and Oakland where it was strongest.

 

My own exposure to the protests came when my lady and I were in downtown Athens, Ga., a few days ago. We had a tasty Southern breakfast at the Mayflower, a nice little restaurant just off the campus of the University of Georgia.

 

Afterwards, we took a stroll. Before long, we came up on the Occupy Athens encampment along the sidewalk near the famous University of Georgia arches. Like a lot of people I have been following the Occupy movement through various media. I have some friends who are actively involved in it around the country, and I know quite a few folks who are derisive of the entire movement.

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Andrew Weil, MD: 10 Ways to Have a Happier Life

Andrew Weil, MD:  10 Ways to Have a Happier Life | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

In my new book, "Spontaneous Happiness," I write about lifestyle practices that can help people achieve and maintain happy lives. Bear in mind that by "happy," I am not referring to endless bliss. Despite what many in the media proclaim these days, such a state is neither achievable nor desirable. Instead, these practices are designed to help most people reach and maintain a state of contentment and serenity. From there, a person can still experience appropriate emotional highs and lows, but knows that he or she will soon return to a pleasant state that might be termed emotional sea level...

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Norman Slilverman, MD: The ability to quantify empathy

There is an evidence-based scientific foundation for studying empathy as an important factor in patients’ health.

 

Dr. Mohammodieza Hojat and a multidisciplinary team at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia have previously published 5 articles validating an objective and reproducible measure of empathy exhibited by physicians in the context of medical education and patient care. They hypothesized that a physician’s empathy would positively effect clinical outcome, not just patient satisfaction.

 

To test their theory, they chose patients with diabetes, a chronic disease that requires frequent engagement between patient and doctor, much patient education and communication as well as strict compliance to designated treatment protocols. Moreover, there are definable and easily measurable indicators of improved clinical outcomes. Appropriate statistical controls were used to separate the effect of empathy from other know determinants of outcome such as gender, age and socioeconomic status.

 

They followed 891 diabetic patients for 3 years and conclusively showed that physicians’ empathy itself resulted in a 40-50% improvement in the measured results. Finally, in their concluding remarks, the researchers acknowledged any limitations to their methodology, but stated that their results do provide sufficient evidence warranting replication of this line of investigation at other institutions and with a variety of diseases...

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Daniel Patrick Downen MS AJ/S: Restorative Justice: Transforming Corrections

Daniel Patrick Downen MS AJ/S: Restorative Justice: Transforming Corrections | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

As a component of public safety the Departments of Corrections have for years held to the notion that “tough on crime” involves an effective system of incarceration and that this alone would address any and all issues we have with societal crime. The standing belief by many administrators and the public was that the punitive aspects of incarceration would deter further crime and effectively hold offenders accountable for their decision to commit crime.

 

Through education and research we have since come to understand that there is, in fact, much causation that contributes to crime. That ones’ decision to commit crime is influenced by many sociological and psychological determinants. However, society in general has not been educated to the complexities of crime and still clings to the concept that incarceration alone is sufficient to address criminal behavior. Many conclude that any treatment programming for offenders is not “tough on crime” as it makes prison more tolerable or less punitive. Additionally the thought is, why should we give convicted felons all these services for free while hard working law abiding people have to pay for them. This has been the error in thinking for decades.

 

As a result, we are now faced with out of control overcrowding due to enormous rates of recidivism. Corrections in many states are one of the largest budgeted agencies and we are not getting the most return for our public safety investment dollars. The level of public safety is greatly reduced as tax dollar expenditures greatly increase. We simply cannot afford to keep re-processing and incarcerating the same offenders over and over...

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Ken Butigan | Not in Our World / Waging Nonviolence - People-Powered News and Analysis

The scripts run deep.

 

Faced with violence or injustice, we’ve often been trained by our families, our media, and our societies to react in one of three basic ways: avoidance, accommodation or violence. These well-grooved neural pathways are not only moral positions—they are often survival strategies. Not getting involved, going along or meeting violence with violence promises us survival and safety.

 

These scripts, though, often upend this promise by failing to engage deeply and effectively with the realities at hand. The conflicts in our lives or our world have a life of their own, feeding and stoking the embers of fear, powerlessness, despair and retaliation if they’re not dealt with. Often it’s only a matter of time before another fire gets rolling.

 

In spite of the tenacity of these scripts, a nonviolent shift is underway. This doesn’t mean a utopia free of violence and injustice is coming. Instead, it means we are steadily creating resources and practices that equip more and more people to deal effectively with the violence they face. This transition, in fact, also includes a shift of thinking for those of us who are peacemakers: from a vision of establishing an impossibly idealistic world to one where, while still facing violence and injustice, tools for nonviolent transformation are more plentiful, accessible, and increasingly the default...

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Robert Brooks: Empathy: Turning Feelings and Beliefs into Action

In my workshops and writings I have consistently emphasized the importance of empathy as an essential skill for enriching our lives. In books I have co-authored with my close friend and colleague Dr. Sam Goldstein, such as Raising Resilient Children and The Power of Resilience: Achieving Balance, Confidence, and Personal Strength in Your Life, we devote chapters to the concepts of empathy and empathic communication as key ingredients involved in the development of positive relationships and resilience. Psychologist Dr. Daniel Goleman has highlighted empathy as an integral component of both "emotional intelligence" and "social intelligence."

 

My first two website articles, which were written in February and March, 1999, examined the concept of empathy. The selection of this topic for my inaugural website articles reflected the significance of this concept in my philosophy and approach. I have returned to the theme of empathy on a number of occasions, including my September, 2010 article in which I suggest that if our children are to become empathic, it is essential for the adults in their lives to model empathy rather than just preach about it. I cited an article authored by Maia Szalavitz that was published on the Time website in which she observes, "A child's capacity for empathy can further be encouraged when parents model empathetic behavior themselves. When parents treat other people with compassion, selflessness, and a lack of judgment, children copy those behaviors."

 

Modeling empathy is not mutually exclusive from providing children with exercises that encourage them to consider the feelings of others and to reflect upon the ways in which their actions are experienced by others. Carefully planned exercises, free of lecturing/preaching, can serve as powerful techniques to assist our children to take the perspective of other people and appreciate the world through their eyes. Empathy is not only a crucial dimension of a "resilient mindset," but I believe it is a vital foundation for such behaviors as compassion and caring...

 

read the whole article @ http://www.drrobertbrooks.com/writings/articles/1108.html

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Doctors Can Learn Empathy Through a Computer-Based Tutorial

Cancer doctors want to offer a sympathetic ear, but sometimes miss the cues from patients. To help physicians better address their patients' fears and worries, a Duke University researcher has developed a new interactive training tool.

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