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The Nonviolent Story: Jesus and Nonviolent Conflict

Three Forms of Nonviolent Power

 

There are three basic ways in which we can use nonviolent power. That is, power that doesn't use violence.

 

These ways are: protest and persuasion, noncooperation and intervention.

 

Imagine this child - maybe your child, maybe a child you know. You've asked the child to clean up their toys. You think it's a reasonable demand, but the child is not impressed. You are stopping the fun time. The child says, "No," and you say, "yes, you will!" And so begins the battle.

 

Now, you're bigger and older than the child. You can raise your voice, you can stand over the child. When I was a child and I did something my parents didn't like, they might even hit me with a wooden spoon!

 

The child can't hit back very hard, but has other "weapons" that he or she can use.

First, the child might protest, "I don't want to clean up, I'm having too much fun!" Then she might try to use persuasion, "Just give me five more minutes - I promise I'll clean up then."

 

If that doesn't work the child might resort to noncooperation, and simply not do what you ask. No matter how angry you get. she just sits there with her arms crossed and an angry look on his face. If the child uses this tactic there really is nothing we can do to make the child to do what we want.
 

Even if we try to make the child afraid of us, noncooperation is a very powerful tool of nonviolent action. And I know from experience, as a parent, that I end up feeling so sad that I've wanted my own child to be afraid of me.

 

Finally, if a child still can't get what she wants she might stand between you and the toys, preventing you from starting to clean up. This is nonviolent intervention.

 

Nonviolent action can be a very powerful force. And it is used everyday, in our homes, our schools, our workplaces and our governments.

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The Chemical That Makes You Fall In Love

The Chemical That Makes You Fall In Love | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Our brains are awash in a sea of hormones. Is it any wonder love still baffles us? But, here's some news you can use: Don't look for the perfect partner. Look for someone who wants to trade oxytocin.
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Indian Woman Has Been on a Hunger Strike for the Last 12 Years

Indian Woman Has Been on a Hunger Strike for the Last 12 Years | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Irom Sharmila Chanu, also known as the Iron Lady of Manipur, has been fasting since November 2000, the longest political protest in history...
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Walter Wink, RIP! | Rev. Richard Deats

Walter Wink, RIP! | Rev. Richard Deats | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Walter Wink, 76, one of the most creative and influential scholars of our day, died peacefully at his home in Sandisfield in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts on May 10, 2012.

 

Wink’s breakthrough insights about the contemporary meaning of the principalities and powers, and Jesus’ third way of dealing with the enemy/oppressor – neither fight nor flight but nonviolent resistance – spoke powerfully to the struggle and transformation experienced in the self-giving love of Jesus. This found eager audiences in churches, retreat centers, peace and justice groups, and in many places – East and West Germany; Northern Ireland, Scotland, and England; South Korea; Palestine; Aotearoa New Zealand; Chile, Mexico, and throughout the Americas. Walter’s wife June, dancer and potter, traveled with him and was an integral part of the workshops that integrated mind, body, and spirit in the experience of the participants. In 2006 they were honored with FOR’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Peace Award.

 

No remembrance of Walter Wink is complete without highlighting his commitment to the way of prayer as essential to deeply rooted activism. “Nonviolence is an aperture open to God,” he writes. “It is intercession in action.” He continues (in The Powers That Be): "the struggle against evil can make us evil, and no amount of good intentions automatically prevents its happening. The whole armor of God that Ephesians 6:10-20 counsels us to put on is crafted specifically to protect us against that contagion of evil within our own souls, and its metals are all forged in prayer."

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james.prieto's comment, May 16, 2012 11:42 AM
Walter Wink deeply contributed to my life journey and integration. I'm grateful for his fresh perspective on "The Powers" and the teachings of Jesus on nonviolence, domination and love. I find that Wink's work is just as relevant today than when it first came out. Thank you Walter Wink for stepping out of the box to shine your light!
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Can Online Video Usher In A New Age Of Empathy?

Can Online Video Usher In A New Age Of Empathy? | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Almost 100 years have passed since the first regularly scheduled international flight. It’s been 85 years since the first international telephone call, and more than 30 years since the United Nations standardized passports.

 

We’re speeding towards a global citizenship marked by the ability to create and share with those around the block or across the world. Over the next 10 years, I believe the winners of new media will be those who don’t divide along national boundaries but transmit through them. On the other side we’ll emerge with more understanding, connections, and empathy.

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Study Finds a Key to Happiness

Study Finds a Key to Happiness | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Happiness can be fleeting. This study finds a key to ongoing happiness: hang on to good times, and don't compare your experiences to those of others.
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All about Empathy:Edwin Interviews Jori Manske

All about Empathy:Edwin Interviews Jori Manske | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Jori says Empathy is like 2 hearts beating together, a salve for the heart, or walking with another in sync. Punishment and domination are the antithesis.

 

How to Build a Culture of Empathy?
1. Clarity of awareness and intention - what is empathy and why it matters.

2. Compassionate leadership - with everyone leading their own life and influencing with compassion.

3. Cultural change can happen in a society within one generation if children have a model of empathy, and education is a collaborative exploration.

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Yes, pain really is all in your head – Health – Lifestyle – New Zealand Listener

Yes, pain really is all in your head – Health – Lifestyle – New Zealand Listener | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
A revolution in brain science has led to the discovery of new ways to stop persistent pain.

 

Ken Ng was 12 when he had his left leg amputated below the knee to stop the spread of bone cancer. It was the start of a long journey of pain. Phantom sensations from his amputated limb haunted him as a teenager, including stabbing sensations and a vice-like constriction around his stump. It got worse when he moved to Wellington to begin studying for his law degree. By 2009, the sensations flooding in from his absent limb were consuming him.

 

Each day he downed a succession of prescription painkillers – codeine, tramadol, Neurofen and Voltaren. “I couldn’t really study any more, I couldn’t sit my exams. It made me introverted, I didn’t want anything to do with people. I wasn’t eating, I stopped going to lectures and the tramadol was making me hallucinate.” Ng sought help from his GP, who referred him to Capital & Coast District Health Board’s pain clinic. Luckily for Ng, the clinic had just begun to offer a simple but revolutionary new therapy, which recognises that some types of chronic pain are caused not by tissue damage but by changes in the wiring of the brain. Ng started his treatment with two weeks of computer exercises looking at pictures of right and left legs, and then began mirror therapy.

 

Ng’s occupational therapist, Maria Polaczuk, seated him with a large mirror positioned upright between his legs so it reflected his whole right leg. “All I could see was two bare normal legs. I massaged my right foot with my hands, manipulated it up and down. I was getting a sense of what a foot felt like.” As he looked at this reflected whole leg in the mirror, where usually he would see an amputated limb, something strange started to happen. “The tingling painful sensation in my stump started to fade and become less prominent.”

 

After two weeks of mirror exercises, four times a day, the phantom pain disappeared altogether. Now 22, Ng has been able to stop taking painkillers. He has had one brief attack of phantom pain, after a period of stress, but apart from that he experiences only the more routine discomfort of pressure on his stump from his prosthesis. Mirror therapy is one byproduct of a great leap forward in science’s understanding of pain and how it is manufactured in the human brain.

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» 10 Things You Can Do in 10 Minutes to Boost Happiness - World of Psychology

» 10 Things You Can Do in 10 Minutes to Boost Happiness - World of Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Self-care doesn’t require hours of free time. In fact, just 10 minutes or less can help to boost your well-being.
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The Trust Molecule

The Trust Molecule | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Why are some people trustworthy while others cheat and lie, some generous and others coldhearted louts? Part of the answer may lie in the hormone oxytocin. In an excerpt from The Moral Molecule, Paul J. Zakon the new science of morality— and how it could be used to create a more virtuous society.

 

Research that I have done over the past decade suggests that a chemical messenger called oxytocin accounts for why some people give freely of themselves and others are coldhearted louts, why some people cheat and steal and others you can trust with your life, why some husbands are more faithful than others, and why women tend to be nicer and more generous than men. In our blood and in the brain, oxytocin appears to be the chemical elixir that creates bonds of trust not just in our intimate relationships but also in our business dealings, in politics and in society at large...

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Motivating Sustainable Behaviour | Cruxcatalyst

Motivating Sustainable Behaviour | Cruxcatalyst | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Motivating Sustainable Behaviour...

 

Along with many other people, I’ve been thinking a lot about how to bring about behaviour change, and looking to psychology, neuroscience and studies on motivation and values for insights.

 

Here’s a few learnings that could help your work...

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Edwin Rutsch interview with Jim Manske: How to Build a Culture of Empathy

Edwin Rutsch interview with Jim Manske:  How to Build a Culture of Empathy | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Empathy is like being a tracker that is following the trail, or a delicious banquet; the opposite is a mechanic that is trying to fix everything.


How can we build a culture of empathy? Supporting people in creating a life-serving system within themselves, in their primary relationship, family, workplace, neighborhood, and community. Creating systems that reframe conflict as a necessary part of growth and learning while creating a framework for resolving conflict in a life-serving way.

 

http://cultureofempathy.com/References/Experts/NVC/Jim-Manski.htm

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The brain likes surprises:Alexander Kjerulf

The brain likes surprises:Alexander Kjerulf | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

According to research, we become a happier when good things happen to us (duh!) but the effect is even bigger when good things happen to us unexpectedly:

Emory University and Baylor College of Medicine researchers used Magnetic Resonance Imaging brain scans to measure changes in human brain activity in response to a sequence of pleasurable stimuli.

 

They used a computer-controlled device to squirt fruit juice or water into the mouths of 25 research participants. The patterns of the squirting were either predictable or unpredictable.

 

The researchers found that the MRI scans showed a brain area called the nucleus accumbens to be much more active when the subjects received unpredictable patterns of juice and water.

 

So:

Something nice happens that you expect = good
Something nice happens unexpectedly = even better

 

Read more...

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» A Tribute to the Leadership Responsibility of Mothers: Joe Wilner

» A Tribute to the Leadership Responsibility of Mothers: Joe Wilner | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Mothers are a unique leader of their children and family. They fill a crucial role of teaching future generations the power of living a loving and compassionate life.

 

This is because mothers live with a sense of love that is unmatched by most. They approach life with a caring and courageous heart and the decisions they make are anchored in love.

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The Amygdala Made Me Do It

The Amygdala Made Me Do It | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
It’s the invasion of the Can’t-Help-Yourself books.

 

These books possess a unifying theme: The choices we make in day-to-day life are prompted by impulses lodged deep within the nervous system. Not only are we not masters of our fate; we are captives of biological determinism. Once we enter the portals of the strange neuronal world known as the brain, we discover that — to put the matter plainly — we have no idea what we’re doing.

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People's panel special edition: is war inevitable?

People's panel special edition: is war inevitable? | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

I predict that if we see war as a choice, and not as something that is foisted on us by forces beyond our control, and if we do all we can to end war, we will succeed. We reason that the best way to achieve peace is to arm ourselves and even attack potential enemies before they attack us. We need to recognize the fallacy of this sort of logic, which in the nuclear era poses a threat to our very existence..   -John Horgan

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Mary MacKenzie: Living In The Observation As A Daily Practice

Mary MacKenzie: Living In The Observation As A Daily Practice | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
If it's true that "everything someone does or says is an attempt to meet a need," what needs do judgment and blame serve?

 

The other day, I was in a gathering and I ran into a woman two times. What I mean is, I looked up and she was right there and we were standing so close that I was startled. After an hour at this event, I was pulling out of my parking place. I looked both ways and waited for a car to go by and then pulled out of my parking space and I nearly side-swiped the lady's car. The very same lady!

 

In each case, I apologized and blamed myself. Then, on my way home, I started to blame her. Do you ever find yourself ruminating on your judgments and trying to place blame? Has this behavior ever relieved your anxiety or angst over the situation? It hasn't succeeded for me even once, yet I've tried it countless times throughout my life and one more time with this lady.

 

Click through to read the rest of the story!

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» It’s Not What You Have But How You See it: How to Live With Contentment - Adventures in Positive Psychology

» It’s Not What You Have But How You See it: How to Live With Contentment - Adventures in Positive Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Have you ever noticed that the more you have the more you want? Let's face it. Seeing our life as good enough doesn't come naturally for many people any longer.
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International Symposia for Contemplative Studies

International Symposia for Contemplative Studies | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

International Symposia for Contemplative Studies – A collaborative effort among Centers and Laboratories around the world that explore the correlates and consequences of contemplative practice.  FREE WEBSTREAMING OF TALKS!

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Intelligence is Overrated: What You Really Need to Succeed, by Keld Jensen

Intelligence is Overrated: What You Really Need to Succeed, by Keld Jensen | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Albert Einstein's was estimated at 160, Madonna's is 140, and John F. Kennedy's was only 119, but as it turns out, IQ score aren't everything when it comes to predicting your success and professional achievement.
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Seven Scientific Facts That Will Change the Way You View The World. ~ Tim Illencik

Seven Scientific Facts That Will Change the Way You View The World. ~ Tim Illencik | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

“I look up at the night sky, and I know that, yes, we are part of this Universe, we are in this Universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up—many people feel small, because they’re small and the Universe is big, but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars.” – Neil deGrasse Tyson

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The Unknown Inventor Whose Work Is Saving The Developing World

The Unknown Inventor Whose Work Is Saving The Developing World | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
If you’re a lucky inventor, maybe you come up with one big thing that makes an impact on people.

 

Ashok Gadgil, the winner of the 2012 $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation, has produced two inventions that have changed the lives of people in the developing world, and is now working on a third. How has he pulled this off?

 

It helps that Gadgil, a professor in the Department of Civil Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, has a science background. But his explanation is fairly simple: "In each case it was becoming aware of how serious the problem was and then being aware that actually there is some technical solution that could help. It’s like you find a puzzle, but the nice thing about this puzzle is that if you solve it you’re making people’s lives better."

 

 

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Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, tries new approach to school discipline — suspensions drop 85%

Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, tries new approach to school discipline — suspensions drop 85% | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
THE FIRST TIME THAT principal Jim Sporleder tried the New Approach to Student Discipline at Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, he was blown away. Because it worked. In fact, it worked so well ...

 

that he never went back to the Old Approach to Student Discipline. This is how it went down:

 

A student blows up at a teacher, drops the F-bomb. The usual approach at Lincoln – and, safe to say, at most high schools in this country – is automatic suspension. Instead, Sporleder sits the kid down and says quietly:

 

“Wow. Are you OK? This doesn’t sound like you. What’s going on?” He gets even more specific: “You really looked stressed. On a scale of 1-10, where are you with your anger?”

 

The kid was ready. Ready, man! For an anger blast to his face….”How could you do that?” “What’s wrong with you?”…and for the big boot out of school. But he was NOT ready for kindness. The armor-plated defenses melt like ice under a blowtorch and the words pour out: “My dad’s an alcoholic. He’s promised me things my whole life and never keeps those promises.” The waterfall of words that go deep into his home life, which is no piece of breeze, end with this sentence: “I shouldn’t have blown up at the teacher.”

 

Whoa...

 

And then he goes back to the teacher and apologizes. Without prompting from Sporleder.

 

“The kid still got a consequence,” explains Sporleder – but he wasn’t sent home, a place where there wasn’t anyone who cares much about what he does or doesn’t do. He went to ISS — in-school suspension, a quiet, comforting room where he can talk about anything with the attending teacher, catch up on his homework, or just sit and think about how maybe he could do things differently next time.

 

Before the words “namby-pamby”, “weenie”, or “not the way they did things in my day” start flowing across your lips, take a look at these numbers:

2009-2010 (Before new approach)

798 suspensions (days students were out of school)
50 expulsions
600 written referrals


2010-2011 (After new approach)

135 suspensions (days students were out of school)
30 expulsions
320 written referrals

 

Read more... its a long article!

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Nonviolent Communication (NVC) Conference - Ventura County, CA

Nonviolent Communication (NVC) Conference - Ventura County, CA | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

See you soon in Oxnard!!!

 

Warmly,

 

Jim

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» Video: More on Building Resiliency - World of Psychology

» Video: More on Building Resiliency - World of Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Psychological resilience and resiliency are important because the more resilient a person is, the happier a life they will lead.
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