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Radical Compassion
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Principles of Conflict Transformation | TransConflict | Transform, Transcend, Translate

Principles of Conflict Transformation | TransConflict | Transform, Transcend, Translate | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

TransConflict has developed the following set of Principles which we hope will contribute to the conceptual debate about conflict transformation, whilst helping to guide individuals and organizations alike in the field of conflict transformation...

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Positive Psychology News Daily » The Positive Psychology Oscars of 2011: Character Strengths and Best Picture

Positive Psychology News Daily » The Positive Psychology Oscars of 2011: Character Strengths and Best Picture | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

This is the third year that Ryan Niemiec has prepared us for the Oscar award evening by nominating movies for positive psychology awards.

As co-author of Positive Psychology at the Movies and scientist at the VIA Institute, Ryan is perfectly placed to suggest the positive psychology awards for the movies of 2011.

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Yes!: 10 Things Science Says Will Make You Happy

Yes!: 10 Things Science Says Will Make You Happy | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Scientists can tell us how to be happy. Really. Here are 10 ways, with the research to prove it.
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NYT: Exuberance for Novelty Has Benefits

NYT: Exuberance for Novelty Has Benefits | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Novelty-seeking, a personality trait long associated with trouble, turns out to be one of the crucial predictors of emotional and physical well-being.
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Kindness Scientist

This profile on UC Berkeley Professor Dacher Keltner highlights his breakthrough research on the science of kindness and compassion. (Scientist proves that compassion is the workplace is beneficial to our well being.

Via Emiliana Simon-Thomas, Ph.D.
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» How Fun Is Your Workplace? Your Home? - World of Psychology

» How Fun Is Your Workplace? Your Home? - World of Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

In The Levity Effect: Why it Pays to Lighten Up, Adrian Gostick and Scott Christopher make an interesting argument that “levity” is an extremely effective tool for helping people to work better. An atmosphere of light-heartedness, it turns out, helps people pay attention, eases tensions, and enhances a feeling of connection.

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This Will Make You Smarter: 151 Big Thinkers Each Pick a Concept to Enhance Your Cognitive Toolkit

This Will Make You Smarter: 151 Big Thinkers Each Pick a Concept to Enhance Your Cognitive Toolkit | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Every year for more than a decade, intellectual impresario and Edge editor John Brockman has been asking the era’s greatest thinkers a single annual question, designed to illuminate some important aspect of how we understand the world. In 2010, he asked how the Internet is changing the way we think. In 2011, with the help of psycholinguist Steven Pinker and legendary psychologist Daniel Kahneman, he posed an even grander question: “What scientific concept will improve everybody’s cognitive toolkit?” The answers, featuring a wealth of influential scientists, authors, and thought-architects, are released today in This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking — a formidable anthology of short essays by 151 of our time’s biggest thinkers on subjects as diverse as the power of networks, cognitive humility, the paradoxes of daydreaming, information flow, collective intelligence, and a dizzying, mind-expanding range in between. Together, they construct a powerful toolkit of meta-cognition — a new way to think about thinking itself.

 

As infinitely fascinating and stimulating as This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking is, its true gift — Brockman’s true gift — is in acting as a potent rupture in the filter bubble of our curiosity, cross-pollinating ideas across a multitude of disciplines to broaden our intellectual comfort zones and, in the process, spark a deeper, richer, more dimensional understanding not only of science, but of life itself.

 

The text of the answers is also available online in its entirety.

 

http://edge.org/annual-question/what-scientific-concept-would-improve-everybodys-cognitive-toolkit

 

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Aren Cohen: Hugs Matter

Aren Cohen: Hugs Matter | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

One of my favorite YouTube videos is called “Free Hugs.” The clip was filmed in Australia, where one day a young man, then a group of people decided to stand in a mall and offer free hugs. The video is amazing. People’s responses, including the police trying to shut them down, are quite profound and moving.
Each time I see it, it brings tears to my eyes.

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DailyGood: Bobby McFerrin's "Don't Worry, Be Happy": A Neuropsychology Reading, by Maria Popova

DailyGood: Bobby McFerrin's "Don't Worry, Be Happy": A Neuropsychology Reading, by Maria Popova | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Unpacking the lyrics of the iconic happiness anthem to find surprising science-tested insights on well-being.


In 1988, Bobby McFerrin wrote one of the most beloved anthems to happiness of all time. On September 24 that year, “Don’t Worry Be Happy” became the first a cappella song to reach #1 on the Billboard Top 100 Chart. But more than a mere feel-good tune, the iconic song is brimming with neuroscience and psychology insights on happiness that McFerrin — whose fascinating musings on music and the brain you might recall from World Science Festival’s Notes & Neurons — embedded in its lyrics, whether consciously or not.

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DailyGood: Stepping Out of the Should Trap , by Joanna Holsten

DailyGood: Stepping Out of the Should Trap , by Joanna Holsten | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

“I should make more money.”
“I should lose weight.”
“I should volunteer more often.”

 

In saying “should” so often, I found myself feeling trapped by a sense of obligation and expectation. I felt this vague pressure to conform to external standards, to be someone or do something. It felt like just being me wasn’t okay. I felt pushed to follow a particular path, behave in specific ways, and believe certain things. In observing my mind and growing towards a more compassionate life, I realized that I had internalized both the messages and the method of the “shoulds.”

 

Messages

 

“Should” messages are familiar to all of us. Our lives are saturated with societal norms of success, beauty, intellect, strength, femininity, masculinity, ad infinitum. If you need a refresher, watch an hour of television or walk around a mall. Unfortunately many of these messages didn’t align with my values.

 

Living in a sea of “shoulds”, I found myself in an impossible situation. I ended up being disappointed with myself or fearful of disappointing others. When I would obey the “should” in my mind, I felt far away from the ideas, needs, and values that I authentically desired. When I would choose to do something not on the “should” list, I felt guilt, shame, or fear that other people would disapprove and judge me negatively. Under the tyranny of the “shoulds,” I couldn’t find genuine fulfillment. I frequently felt lacking.

 

These persistent and powerful messages around us make it very difficult to listen to an inner voice. In some situations, I internalized the “shoulds” so deeply that I didn’t have the chance to discover my own independent beliefs. The "shoulds" lead one to adopt externalized values and never question the commands. By obeying “shoulds,” our belief systems could be coopted by external forces...

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Lucy McKeon: The neuroscience of happiness

Lucy McKeon: The neuroscience of happiness | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
They say money can’t buy happiness. But can a better understanding of your brain? As recent breakthroughs in cognitive science break new ground in the study of consciousness — and its relationship to the physical body — the mysteries of the mind are rapidly becoming less mysterious. But does this mean we’ll soon be able to locate a formula for good cheer?

 

Shimon Edelman, a cognitive expert and professor of psychology at Cornell University, offers some insight in “The Happiness of Pursuit: What Neuroscience Can Teach Us About the Good Life.” In his new book, Edelman walks the reader through the brain’s basic computational skills – its ability to compute information, perform statistical analysis and weigh value judgments in daily life – as a way to explain our relationship with happiness. Our capacity to retain memories and develop foresight allows us to plan for the future, says Edelman, by using a mental “personal space-time machine” that jumps between past, present and future. It’s through this process of motivation, perception, thinking, followed by motor movement, that we’re able not only to survive, but to feel happy. From Bayes’ theorem of probability to Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” Edelman offers a range of references and allegories to explain why a changing, growing self, constantly shaped by new experiences, is happier than the satisfaction any end goal can give us. It turns out the rewards we get for learning and understanding the workings of the world really make it the journey, not the destination, that matters most.

 

Salon spoke with Edelman over the phone about the brain as computer, our cultural investment in happiness, and why knowing how our brains work might make us happier...

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Joe Wilner» Going Through a Difficult Time? How Positive Emotions Can Help You Cope - Adventures in Positive Psychology

Joe Wilner» Going Through a Difficult Time? How Positive Emotions Can Help You Cope - Adventures in Positive Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
We all go through difficult moments in life. These may be ongoing, persistent challenges we face on a daily basis, or more unexpected set-backs that throw us off course.

 

During these times it can be easy to get sullen and discouraged, and neglect all the healthy positive experiences that can still give us joy and hope.

 

Though when we’re able to remember the blessings in our life and dwell on the positives instead of the negatives, it offers us a greater chance of coping with hardship.

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Good Radio Shows: 2012 Episodes

Good Radio Shows: 2012 Episodes | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

What can you do to promote peace?  James O'Dea would like to talk to you...Becoming a Peace Ambassador  Listen on Peace Talks Radio

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A positive life: Forgiving others takes effort, responsibility

A positive life: Forgiving others takes effort, responsibility | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Recently I've been grappling with the loftiness of forgiveness.

 

Alexander Pope famously remarked, "To err is human; to forgive, divine."

 

I'm a long way from divinity, and sometimes it's a stretch for me to forgive. I find I must first release my grievance repeatedly. Forgiveness is more a process than an act. We do not simply decide to exonerate others. Clemency requires more heart than head and a few other ingredients.

 

Being human, we all cause pain as well as have it inflicted upon us. We're not always aware that we've transgressed and not always gracious when informed of it. There is a need for personal responsibility here. However, our response to unjust injury is critically important because our evolutionary history favors reprisal...

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Abundance: A Reminder of the Need to Focus on Our Surpluses and Not Just Our Shortages

Abundance: A Reminder of the Need to Focus on Our Surpluses and Not Just Our Shortages | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
As we move further into the presidential campaign, we're going to hear a lot about the ways we're lacking and where we fall short. And though the conversation has rightly and finally shifted to the need to grow the economy, much of it is still dominated by hysterical and destructive demands to impose deficit-cutting austerity even before the economy gets back on its feet (which would only increase, not cut, the deficit).

 

Of course, it's only right that we should focus on where we're coming up short. Those of us in the media focus too much on autopsies and not enough on biopsies of our problems. So, yes, let's talk about our shortages -- of jobs and revenue and good ideas coming from our leaders. But let's start talking much more about our surpluses.

 

With unemployment still over 8 percent, we currently have more ingenuity, energy, spirit, and expertise than we have jobs -- and definitely more time on our hands. And the story of how this abundance is being put to use, of what is working and how we can scale it, has been part of HuffPost's mission from the very beginning -- and was the guiding principle behind the recent launch of our Good News section.

 

That's why I was so drawn to a new book by Peter Diamandis, who has been a friend for many years and is the CEO and chairman of the X Prize Foundation (of which I am a board member). Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think, co-written by Steven Kotler, arrives in a world facing multiple crises and awash in pessimism. And it offers three things in short supply: solutions, perspective and, just as important, optimism.

 

Arguing, as Diamandis and Kotler do, that the world is getting steadily, demonstrably better carries multiple hazards: of tone-deafness; of giving short shrift to suffering, corruption, and the parts of the world -- including many parts of America -- that are in steady, demonstrable decline.

 

But Abundance is not a work of Pollyannaism. The portraits of brilliant and empathetic minds at work improving the human condition are not an excuse to ignore the many areas in which our leaders and institutions are failing us. Rather, they are a reminder of the possibility of doing good by tapping into our collective intelligence and wisdom -- and into game-changing advances in technology. As Diamandis and Kotler point out, a Maasai tribesman living in Kenya today with a cellphone has better mobile communications than President Reagan had 25 years ago. And if it's a smartphone with an Internet connection, the tribesman has instant access to more knowledge and information than President Clinton had just 15 years ago.

 

Abundance delves into the ways innovators and entrepreneurs have seized on the advances in computing, robotics, artificial intelligence and medicine, collectively solving problems like never before. It puts special emphasis on the wave of Do It Yourself innovators who "can now tackle problems that were once the sole purview of big governments and large corporations" -- citing many examples, including Burt Rutan, an aerospace engineer who became frustrated by the state of government-run space exploration (one of Diamandis' passions) and built SpaceShipOne, a human-carrying spaceplane built by a team of thirty engineers that outperformed the government's model, at a lower cost. Then there are the more than 100 teams who have signed up to take on the $10 million Qualcomm Tricorder X PRIZE challenge to build a hand-held, consumer-friendly device combining artificial intelligence, digital imaging, and cloud computing to bring to life the mythical "medical tricorder" from Star Trek that will ultimately allow users to diagnose themselves better than a doctor can.

 

The book also spotlights the ways the walls have come down in terms of how we connect. Social entrepreneurs have created sites like DonorsChoose.org, Crowdrise, Kiva, and Enterprise Community Partners. Diamandis and Kotler highlight groups that exemplify the DIY principle -- especially those operating in spheres that were formerly the sole province of government. These groups are expanding our understanding of the ways we can innovate, improve, and help each other.

 

In education, there's Sal Khan, a one-time hedge fund analyst who founded the Khan Academy, featuring a series of digital video lessons for students of all ages, on subjects ranging from history to math to molecular biology. According to the book, as of last summer, the Khan Academy was getting more than 2 million visitors a month and building up its library at the rate of three new videos a day. Abundance charts the rise of Khan's idea from a series of videos shared online with his cousins to "an underground Internet sensation" to a full-fledged education movement; after hearing Khan's TED talk last year, Bill Gates told attendees that they "just got a glimpse of the future of education."

 

"Technophilanthropists" -- as the authors label a collection of tech entrepreneurs who made their money before the age of 40 and are now turning their attention and their considerable resources to solving the world's biggest problems -- are another group the book identifies as essential in building a future of abundance. As examples they point to Gates' crusade against malaria, and Jeff Skoll's work fighting pandemics and nuclear proliferation. Because many of these Technophilanthropists made their money reinventing entire industries, when they turn their attention to philanthropy they are, by their very nature, bold and global.

 

And then there are the world's poorest people, the "Rising Billion" whose limited circumstances have historically locked them out of the conversation. But no more. "The net is allowing us to turn ourselves into a giant, collective meta-intelligence," the authors write. "And this meta-intelligence continues to grow as more and more people come online. Think about this for a moment: by 2020, nearly 3 billion people will be added to the Internet's community." It's like sitting at a table with a group of people, and having another group of people -- bringing different insights and perspectives -- pull up chairs and join the conversation. But what Diamandis and Kotler are talking about delivers this on a global scale...

 

 

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Cornell Chronicle: Book says we compute happiness

Cornell Chronicle: Book says we compute happiness | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
In 'The Happiness of Pursuit,' psychology professor Shimon Edelman offers an explanation of how we process our world and the 'elbow room' in which we can chase happiness.
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Jamaica’s Judiciary embraces restorative justice — CJ | Share News

Chief Justice Zaila McCalla said the judiciary fully embraces the move by government to introduce restorative justice principles within the justice system.

 

The Ministry of Justice is looking to apply the concept to the local court system and is currently carrying out a pilot program in four communities: Tower Hill, St. Andrew; Spanish Town, St. Catherine; May Pen, Clarendon and Granville, St. James. As a pivotal part of the activities marking the just-concluded Restorative Justice Week, four restorative justice centres have been opened in these pilot areas.

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Yes, Your Job Can Be Fun | Psychology Today

Yes, Your Job Can Be Fun | Psychology Today | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Is your work play? It can be....
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Mirror Neurons Help Explain Why Baseball Hitting Is Contagious | Axon Potential

Mirror Neurons Help Explain Why Baseball Hitting Is Contagious | Axon Potential | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

One of baseball’s well worn axioms is that “hitting is contagious.” Once a few batters get on base, those hitting behind them rally at the plate. In fact, MLB batting averages are roughly 50%–70% higher for a batter following hits by the previous two batters as compared to outs made by the previous two batters. While baseball theorists have explanations for this such as rattled pitchers or motivated hitters, recent cognitive science research points to a unique learning system in our brains known as mirror neurons.

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Uh-oh...A School Where Kids Can Play All Day? | Psychology Today

Uh-oh...A School Where Kids Can Play All Day? | Psychology Today | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
It's every modern parent's worst nightmare—a school where kids can play all day. But no one takes the easy way out, and graduates seem to have a head start on the information age. Welcome to Sudbury Valley.
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The solution to the latest bullying headlines? Forget legislation: It's time to Start Empathy.

The solution to the latest bullying headlines? Forget legislation: It's time to Start Empathy. | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Earlier this week, reports surfaced about an 11-year-old boy with autism, who was beaten up by a fellow student while waiting at the bus stop.

 

The event was filmed on a student’s cell phone, as his peers egged on his attacker, and subsequently uploaded to Facebook.

 

It later emerged that Kaleb Kula, the victim of the assault, had endured similar taunts beginning in the 1st grade, and his parents had repeatedly contacted the administration expressing their concern.

 

On the surface, the school had followed procedure, obeying the letter of the law. Maryland’s Cecil County Public School District upholds a strict anti-bullying policy, and maintains an online form where parents, peers, teachers, and other witnesses are encouraged to report incidents of bullying.

The form is in keeping with the Safe Schools Reporting Act of 2005, and a host of awareness-raising measures since, ranging from Bullying Awareness Week to enhanced legislation to high-profile media coverage. The result has led to adramatic increase in the number of incidents reported throughout the state, reaching 3,800 incidents in 2009-2010: nearly double that from the previous year.

 

Yet as Kaleb’s story shows, reporting incidents and dolling out reprimands only goes so far. Charging the student who attacked Kaleb with second-degree assault and laying blame on the district—which has called together parents to discuss bullying in wake of the incident—will not fix the problem. What’s needed is a concerted effort to address the issue at its root: equipping students with the ability to stand up when they see peers being mistreated and to avoid conflict in the first place...

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Spanking kids can cause long-term harm: Canada study | Sympatico.ca News

Spanking kids can cause long-term harm: Canada study | Sympatico.ca News | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
TORONTO (Reuters) - Spanking children can cause long-term developmental damage and may even lower a child's IQ, according to a new Canadian analysis that seeks to shift the ethical debate over corporal punishment into the medical sphere.
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Annie Murphy Paul: Discovering How to Learn Smarter | MindShift

Annie Murphy Paul: Discovering How to Learn Smarter | MindShift | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

It’s not often that a story about the brain warms the heart. But that’s exactly what happened to me when I read an article last month in the Washington Post. It’s about how teachers in many schools in the D.C. area are foregoing empty praise of the “Good job!” variety, in favor of giving students solid information that will do them some real good. That information concerns how their brains work and how their intelligence and skills develop, and it’s knowledge that should be made available to every child in the country.

 

Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck conducted the groundbreaking research showing that praise intended to raise young people’s self-esteem can seriously backfire. When we tell children, “You’re so smart,” we communicate the message that they’d better not take risks or make mistakes, lest they reveal that they’re not so smart after all. Dweck calls this cautious attitude the “fixed mindset,” and she’s found that it’s associated with greater anxiety and reduced achievement. Students with a “growth mindset,” on the other hand, believe that intelligence can be expanded with hard work and persistence, and they view challenges as invigorating and even fun. They’re more resilient in the face of setbacks, and they do better academically.

 

Now Dweck has designed a program, called Brainology, which aims to help students develop a growth mindset. Its website explains: “Brainology makes this happen by teaching students how the brain functions, learns, and remembers, and how it changes in a physical way when we exercise it. Brainology shows students that they are in control of their brain and its development.” That’s a crucial message to pass on to children, and it’s not just empty words of encouragement—it’s supported by cutting-edge research on neuroplasticity, which shows that the brain changes and grows when we learn new things. You, and your child, can learn to be smarter.

 

That, in fact, is something like the credo of this column, which will be appearing every week on MindShift. Each week, I’ll share the latest findings from neuroscience, cognitive science and psychology—discoveries that help us understand how we learn and how we can do it better. I hope you’ll join me here, and share what you read with others. We’ll be doing out part to spread a growth mindset, one click at a time.

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Who’s Afraid of Unhappiness? | Psychology Today

Who’s Afraid of Unhappiness? | Psychology Today | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Unhappiness feels threatening so we combat it with an arsenal of weapons. I think we would find it less threatening if we understood its evolutionary purpose

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Unhappy chemicals promote survival in the state of nature. If you are a hungry gazelle, you would rather be eating than running from a lion. Cortisol has to feel very bad to get you to do what it takes to save your life. It works! You can thank your cortisol for getting you to take action when necessary to meet your needs.

 

But cortisol didn't evolve for you to just sit there and be grateful for it. It evolved to give you the bad feeling that you will die if you don't "do something, now!"

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Everything You Thought You Knew About Learning Is Wrong

Everything You Thought You Knew About Learning Is Wrong | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Taking notes during class? Topic-focused study? A consistent learning environment? All are exactly opposite the best strategies for learning...
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