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A New Superpower -- An 'Earth Voice' Movement

A New Superpower -- An 'Earth Voice' Movement | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
The emergence of social movements such as the Arab Spring and the Occupy movement demonstrates to ordinary citizens that their collective voice can have a powerful impact, particularly when expressed with the maturity and dignity of non-violence.
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Letting Fourth Graders Solve the World’s Problems

Letting Fourth Graders Solve the World’s Problems | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
John Hunter puts all the problems of the world on a 4'x5' plywood board and lets his 4th-graders solve them.
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How much of happiness is under our control? How can we make the most of it? - Barking up the wrong tree

How much of happiness is under our control? How can we make the most of it? - Barking up the wrong tree | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Happiness doesn't just make us feel good; it can also objectively improve our lives:


A recent and comprehensive meta-analysis revealed a wide variety of benefits that accrue from positive emotion and well-being, including greater career success, better relationship functioning, increased creativity, enhanced physical health, and even longer life expectancy (Lyubomirsky, King, & Diener, 2005).

Source: "Is It Possible to Become Happier? (And If So, How?)" from Social and Personality Psychology Compass 1/1 (2007): 129–145


Are wealthier people happier?

The answer is ‘yes, but not as much as you’d think’. In one meta- analysis of 85 studies, the correlation between income and SWB was only .17 (Haring, Stock, & Okun, 1984). Furthermore, this association typically has a curvilinear component, such that variations in income make the most difference at low levels of income; beyond a certain point of basic sufficiency, income has a smaller effect (Argyle, 1999; Diener & Biswas-Diener, 2002; Diener & Diener, 1995). Indeed, very well-off individuals are only slighter happier than the blue-collar workers they employ (Diener, Horwitz, & Emmons, 1985).


In fact, overall, life circumstances only account for ~10% of happiness:


Indeed, these life-circumstantial factors may account for less than 10% of the variance in happiness (Andrews & Withey, 1976), although Diener (1984) suggested that the figure may be as high as 15%.


What's most important? Genetics. It accounts for 50% of happiness:


Perhaps the single most important determinant of SWB is genetics (Lykken & Tellegen, 1996; Tellegen et al., 1988). Simply put, some people arrive in this world with a predisposition to cheerfulness, optimism, and joy, whereas others are born with a predilection toward fearfulness, pessimism, and depression. Studies of twins separated at birth have yielded heritability estimates for SWB ranging from .40 to .70, with the most common figure around .50.


Does this mean we might as well just give up trying to be happier? No. 40% is still largely under our control and happiness does vary due to the choices we make.


So what can we realistically do to be happier? Endeavor to experience lots of little positive and novel experiences, even if they're minor -- quantity matters more than quality:


As these examples illustrate, our model is quite consistent with ‘bottom-up’ theories of SWB, which argue that it is the cumulative sum of small experiences that matters (Diener, 1984), because people judge their happiness by consulting (i.e., integrating over) memories of their lives. The more positive and novel the recent experiences one can recall, the higher one will rate one’s happiness; in contrast, positive but taken-for- granted experiences do not contribute as much to the judgment, and recalled negative experiences not surprisingly detract from it. As one example of a bottom-up research approach, Sheldon and Elliot (1999) showed that the semester-long accumulation of small satisfying experi- ences in undergraduates (involving feeling autonomous, competent, and related in one’s daily activities) predicted enhanced global SWB at the end of the semester. Simply put, the more positive and meaningful experiences one has along the way, the greater one’s ultimate judgments of well-being.


And make sure to be grateful for the good things that happen to you:


Lyubomirsky, Sheldon, & Schkade (2005) asked participants to think about five things for which they were grateful (i.e., a healthy body, my parents) either once a week or three times a week. Relative to controls, participants who expressed gratitude indicated greater SWB 6 weeks later...

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» 25 Suggestions for Living a Contented Life by Managing Emotions, Part 1 - The Emotionally Sensitive Person

» 25 Suggestions for Living a Contented Life by Managing Emotions, Part 1 - The Emotionally Sensitive Person | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
A few ideas for building a contented life.

...


1. Practice mindfulness. Mindfulness helps reduce anxiety and stress for everyone. Consider a way to practice mindfulness everyday that is easy to remember. Maybe mindfully brush your teeth or mindfully drink your coffee. Consider using a bracelet or a sticky note to remind yourself.


2: Play. If possible, find a way to laugh today. Be silly. Giggle. Dance, watch a comedy, run in the park, buy a balloon, dabble with paints, gather friends for games or play games designed for one player. Just for a few minutes. Enjoy a simple pleasure and focus completely on the activity – not on your concerns.


3. Practice gratitude. Each evening go through your day and list three things you are grateful for. Be specific. Then focus on those three experiences or interactions or things. Savor the positive


4: Nurture relationships. Friends will likely always make you angry or upset, but having friendships is one of the keys to contentment. When you spend time with friends, focus on what you like, what energizes you. Review the positive experiences in your mind to equal out the natural inclination to go over and over painful experiences.


21 more ideas @ http://blogs.psychcentral.com/emotionally-sensitive/2012/07/25-suggestions-for-living-a-contented-life-by-managing-emotions-part-1/

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What do people regret the most before they die? - Barking up the wrong tree

What do people regret the most before they die? - Barking up the wrong tree | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Bonnie Ware worked in palliative care for many years, tending to people during the last three to twelve weeks of their lives. A handful of themes cropped up in the things they regretted during their final days:

1. I wish I'd had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

2. I wish I didn't work so hard.

3. I wish I'd had the courage to express my feelings.

4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.

5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.

To them, these were regrets. For us, maybe the above can be a checklist of what not to do.
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Conflict Keeps Teams at the Top of Their Game

Conflict Keeps Teams at the Top of Their Game | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Managers often worry about conflict in their teams, afraid that any sign of trouble will undermine performance. A typical response to conflict is to ignore it — to avoid getting to the root of the problem and hope that it will somehow go away. In our MBA program we call these "cappuccino teams": Every time conflict rears its ugly head, people break for coffee, presumably in the hope that it will help restore harmony. It may be a nice way to handle conflict, but it isn't particularly effective. Instead, managers need to know how to create teams that feel psychologically safe enough for conflicting opinions to be aired and the benefits of diversity exploited.

What few people seem to realize is that even the most effective teams will feel conflict-prone at times. And there are good reasons for this. Teams composed of high-performing individuals are naturally subject to contradictory tensions, like cooperation and rivalry, trust and vigilance. These tensions should not be managed away — they are productive and can help teams perform better.

For instance, rivalry within a team helps weed out inefficiencies and — however uncomfortable it may feel at times — also keeps people at the top of their game. Besides, high performers are naturally competitive and to not allow them to express their competitive nature is to deny them something that is very much part of who they are. And this can make the team feel psychologically unsafe.

So here are three ways to become more comfortable with team conflict.

First, be careful not to confuse what things feel like with what they really are like. What feels dysfunctional may, for all practical purposes, be perfectly effective. Remember that any conflict feels awkward — "healthy" conflict feels no less uncomfortable for being "healthy". Contrary to popular belief, harmony in teams is far more likely to be the consequence — and not the cause — of performance. In fact, the best way to bond team members may well be to set them a challenge — to give them something to feel good about collectively.

Second, be creative. Take the example of Colonel Stas Preczewski, in charge of a dysfunctional US Army rowing team at West Point. He was faced with an ineffective and conflict-ridden crew. Figuring that the root of the conflict was lack of trust, he had his rowers line up and wrestle each other in pairs. The exercise, albeit very risky in that it could have caused serious injury, made each teammate realize just how physically strong and how competitive they all were. When it came to their next big race, they performed far better than they ever had in practice. The conflict the Colonel faced was potentially corrosive. Conflict that can be generative is based on differences of opinion.

And this brings me to my third piece of advice. Remind your team that these differences of opinion are both inevitable and useful. Invariably, when you put together a team you force people to work with others who will annoy them from time to time. Conflicting opinions are important not only because they smoke out assumptions and enlarge the pool of available information, but because they reveal what matters most to those involved. So explain that any annoyances are likely to be a natural consequence of diversity, and that diversity is precisely what's required for the team to succeed.

Finally, if only organizations would spend as much time and effort on making their teams feel "psychologically safe" as they currently do on instructing people to be "team players", they would likely be far better off as a result. In workplaces where people self-censor for fear of being perceived as negative or incompetent or "not a team player", collaboration will not come as naturally. Human beings are social animals. And so our priorities may have been wrong all along. We must focus on creating safe spaces for people to express themselves and take risks. If we do this well, teamwork will be a no-brainer by comparison.

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People, Animals, and the Environment: We Must Be "Solutionaries" | Psychology Today

A new TEDx talk by Zoe Weil lays out what we must do By Marc Bekoff, Ph.D.......

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Constantly Feel Good About Yourself Using These 3 Steps

Constantly Feel Good About Yourself Using These 3 Steps | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
If you feel as if you need some help on bolstering your feelings of self worth, here are some ideas that you may find helpful....
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Self help: forget positive thinking, try positive action

Self help: forget positive thinking, try positive action | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Jim's note:  I appreciate the wisdom in following savoring with ACTION!  One of the most powerful distinguishing characteristics that set NVC apart from "self-help" is the REQUEST.  Requests stimulate actions that increase the likelihood that more needs can be met with less cost!


If you want to be happier or more confident, research shows that the best way is to act the part, writes Richard Wiseman...


For years self-help gurus have preached the same simple mantra: if you want to improve your life then you need to change how you think. Force yourself to have positive thoughts and you will become happier. Visualise your dream self and you will enjoy increased success. Think like a millionaire and you will magically grow rich. In principle, this idea sounds perfectly reasonable. However, in practice it often proves ineffective.


Take visualisation. Hundreds of self-improvement books encourage readers to close their eyes and imagine their perfect selves; to see themselves in a huge office at the top of the corporate ladder, or sipping a cocktail as they feel the warm Caribbean sand between their toes. Unfortunately, research suggests this technique does not work.

In one study led by Lien Pham at the University of California, students were asked to spend a few moments each day visualising themselves getting a high grade in an upcoming exam. Even though the daydreaming exercise only lasted a few minutes, it caused the students to study less and obtain lower marks. In another experiment led by Gabriele Oettingen from New York University, graduates were asked to note down how often they fantasised about getting their dream job after leaving college. The students who reported that they frequently fantasised about such success received fewer job offers and ended up with significantly smaller salaries.


Why should this be so? Maybe those who fantasise about a wonderful life are ill-prepared for setbacks, or become reluctant to put in the effort required to achieve their goal. Either way, the message is clear – imagining the perfect you is not good for your life.


However, when it comes to change, the message is not all gloom and doom. Decades of research show that there is indeed a simple but highly effective way to transform how you think and feel. The technique turns common sense on its head but is grounded in science. Strangely, the story begins with a world-renowned Victorian thinker and an imaginary bear...

...http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/jun/30/self-help-positive-thinking

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Scientists Invent Mind-Reading System That Lets You Type With Your Brain

Scientists Invent Mind-Reading System That Lets You Type With Your Brain | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Researchers have invented a mind-reading system that, for the first time in history, allows any person to type words and phrases letter by letter, just by thinking....
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Dreading a Task? 5 Tips for Getting Yourself To Tackle It: Gretchen Rubin

Dreading a Task? 5 Tips for Getting Yourself To Tackle It: Gretchen Rubin | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

How many times each day do you try to work yourself up to tackle some undesirable task?

 

 

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Perception and Understanding (Self-Coaching and Self-Awareness) (Ed Batista)

Perception and Understanding (Self-Coaching and Self-Awareness) (Ed Batista) | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

"The intellectual life of man consists almost wholly in his substituting a conceptual order for the perceptual order in which his experience originally comes." William James

 

James biographer Robert Richardson has described the pioneering psychologist as mounting "a lifelong protest on behalf of experience," and James' emphasis on the importance of our immediate sensory perceptions has a parallel in the self-coaching process. While a key step in effective self-coaching is an attitude (and an ongoing process) of self-engagement, this isn't an end in itself; the intended result is an increased sense of self-awareness. I use this term to mean both a heightened in-the-moment perception of our physiological and emotional responses to a situation and a developing understanding of who we are and how we operate as individuals based on those responses...

 

...Note that our physiological and emotional responses are deeply intertwined. An emotion often generates a set of physiological responses that we may perceive before we're even aware that we're having an emotional experience, and what we feel physically often provides important clues to what we're feeling emotionally. When working with someone who's having difficulty naming the emotions they're feeling in the moment, I may ask them to do a mental scan of their body--literally, what do they feel?--and the physical can often be a helpful avenue into the emotional.

 

But whether we're scanning our physiological responses or naming our emotions, the goal is a heightened ability to sense ourselves in the moment and then to make sense of those perceptions.

 

Self-coaching is a form of experiential learning, and if perceiving ourselves more acutely in the moment is a form of reflecting on our experiences, then the act of understanding ourselves more fully as a result of those perceptions is a form of conceptualizing those experiences and distilling them into generalizable principles.

 

Arriving at this understanding--a set of conceptions about ourselves as individuals that we believe in and can act upon--is a subtle, iterative and complex process. We need to hold this understanding provisionally and modify it repeatedly based on new data. We can't jump to conclusions, get locked into an unhelpful mindset, or cling too tightly to our mental models about ourselves.

 

...One final note: My work with coaching clients and students almost always involves increasing their self-awareness in both of the dimensions described above--perception and understanding--and it's not unusual for them to express some frustration that their newfound awareness doesn't immediately translate into change. In my experience as a coach, awareness is insufficient to motivate change on its own, but change rarely occurs without it.

 

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Your Brain on a Magic Trick

Your Brain on a Magic Trick | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Reality and our perception of it are incommensurate to a far greater degree than is commonly believed.
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What Do Emotions Have to Do with Learning?

What Do Emotions Have to Do with Learning? | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Thinkstock When parents and teachers consider how children learn, it’s usually the intellectual aspects of the activity they have in mind.
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The Invisible Bank: How Kenya Has Beaten the World in Mobile Money

The Invisible Bank: How Kenya Has Beaten the World in Mobile Money | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
In the developed world, we are used to the idea that we created the model of industrial and economic progress which other countries must follow. Many of our big ideas about development rest on the assumption that the West cracked the formula for economic progress sometime in the 19th century, and what we need now is for the developing world to ‘catch up’. Even the language we use encapsulates this idea, in the division between ‘developed’ and ‘developing’. But new innovations are challenging the idea that development requires handing ideas down from developed to developing. In banking and finance, the big ideas in cashless transfers and mobile, flexible exchanges are not to be found in Geneva or London or New York. A revolution in mobile money transfer has occurred, but not in these financial centres. Instead, it’s happened in Kenya, with m-Pesa.
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Workplace Well-being

Workplace Well-being | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

On June 28th in Chicago, Nikki Bardoulas attended the Work & Well-Being Conference put on by APA’s Psychologically Healthy Workplace Program.
A variety of engaging speakers, each with unique expertise, offered different perspectives on this broad but increasingly relevant topic. Discussions went from the macro level down to the micro level, ranging from an examination of wellness programs implemented by organizations across the nation to recommendations for individuals to deal successfully with stress.  Follow the link for Nikki's full report!

...http://positivepsychologynews.com/news/nikki-bardoulas/2012070523005

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Young Brains Lack Skills for Sharing: Scientific American

Young Brains Lack Skills for Sharing: Scientific American | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
An underdeveloped prefrontal cortex makes sharing difficult for young children...

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Reflection is critical for development and well-being | Machines Like Us

Reflection is critical for development and well-being | Machines Like Us | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
As each day passes, the pace of life seems to accelerate – demands on productivity continue ever upward and there is hardly ever a moment when we aren’t, in some way, in touch with our family, friends, or coworkers. While moments for reflection may be hard to come by, a new article suggests that the long-lost art of introspection —even daydreaming — may be an increasingly valuable part of life.
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Brain Researchers Start Mapping the Human ‘Connectome’ | SharpBrains

Brain Researchers Start Mapping the Human ‘Connectome’ | SharpBrains | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Brain Researchers Start Mapping the Human 'Connectome': Analogous to the Human Genome Project—which mapped the human genetic code—the......
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Adults smacked as children have higher risk of mental illness later on, say scientists

Adults smacked as children have higher risk of mental illness later on, say scientists | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Adults who were hit or smacked as children face higher odds of mood and anxiety disorders and problems with alcohol and drug abuse, say experts from the University of Manitoba in Canada....
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Why don't stupid people realize they're stupid? - Barking up the wrong tree

Why don't stupid people realize they're stupid? - Barking up the wrong tree | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Jim's note:  Although I'm not fond of evaluative labels like "stupid" or "dunce" as they are likely to lead to disconnection and contribute to less clarity, the underlying point of this article helps me to understand myself and others better, thus increasing my compassion...and my excitement for tools like the Pathways to Liberation Matrix of Self-Assessment that celebrates both incompetence and growing competence!


Successful negotiation of everyday life would seem to require people to possess insight about deficiencies in their intellectual and social skills. However, people tend to be blissfully unaware of their incompetence. This lack of awareness arises because poor performers are doubly cursed: Their lack of skill deprives them not only of the ability to produce correct responses, but also of the expertise necessary to surmise that they are not producing them. People base their perceptions of performance, in part, on their preconceived notions about their skills. Because these notions often do not correlate with objective performance, they can lead people to make judgments about their performance that have little to do with actual accomplishment.


It has since been dubbed the Dunning–Kruger effect:

The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which unskilled people make poor decisions and reach erroneous conclusions, but their incompetence denies them the metacognitive ability to recognize their mistakes. The unskilled therefore suffer from illusory superiority, rating their ability as above average, much higher than it actually is, while the highly skilled underrate their own abilities, suffering from illusory inferiority. Actual competence may weaken self-confidence, as competent individuals may falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding.



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When His Project Was Canceled, an Unemployed Programmer Kept Sneaking Into Apple to Finish the Job - Mental Floss

Jim's note:  I once heard Marshall Rosenberg, founder of CNVC and developer of Nonviolent Communication, say something like, "Nobody can ever fire you from a job.  They may decide to not pay you anymore, but they cannot keep you from doing the work!"  This fellow proves MBR's point in a delightful way!


When an Apple programmer’s project got canceled, he didn’t despair.  He just kept sneaking into the office until the program was finished.


Read the full text here: http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/132066#ixzz1zV4XmSqg

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Managing Moods

Managing Moods | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
While positive emotions are short-lived, the moods that they affect can last for long periods of time. Working on the Pleasant Life includes positive interventions that are geared toward curtailing negative moods and amplifying positive moods.

Managing moods includes coping with negative events and can be considered the flip side of savoring. Todd Kashdan pointed out in a comment that emotion regulation has different temporal aspects, just as savoring does. Thus one can use antecedent focused strategies before you have an emotional experience, as well as response focused strategies after the fact. Here is Todd’s example in quotation marks slightly extended:

 

“I might be about to give a talk at a conference and remind myself that my wife is going to be there and I have given successful talks dozens of times in my career. I modified my thoughts about the situation before it even occurred, effectively managing my mood to be less worried, more engaged, and more excited. During the talk, I might find that my heart is racing after I accidentally belch while moving to the next powerpoint slide. I might realize the absurdity of the situation and when I see people laughing, I might recognize the humor in it if I was in the crowd listening to a gaseous speaker. And so, I work with my emotions while I am experiencing them.” After the speech is over, I can make certain choices in my appraisal of how it went that effect my emotional state. Thus I can either focus on the embarrassing moment, or find other things to remember.

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Can money make us more satisfied with our lives -- but not any happier? - Barking up the wrong tree

Can money make us more satisfied with our lives -- but not any happier? - Barking up the wrong tree | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Prize winner and author of Thinking, Fast and Slow, makes an interesting distinction: high income makes us more satisfied with our lives but it does not make us happier.

What's the difference?

 

If you ask people with more money "Are you happier with your life overall?" they're more likely to respond affirmatively and mean it.

 

If you randomly approach them during the day and say "How happy are you right now?" they're not any more likely to say they're feeling good.

 

Recent research has begun to distinguish two aspects of subjective well-being. Emotional well-being refers to the emotional quality of an individual's everyday experience—the frequency and intensity of experiences of joy, stress, sadness, anger, and affection that make one's life pleasant or unpleasant. Life evaluation refers to the thoughts that people have about their life when they think about it. We raise the question of whether money buys happiness, separately for these two aspects of well-being. We report an analysis of more than 450,000 responses to the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index, a daily survey of 1,000 US residents conducted by the Gallup Organization. We find that emotional well-being (measured by questions about emotional experiences yesterday) and life evaluation (measured by Cantril's Self-Anchoring Scale) have different correlates. Income and education are more closely related to life evaluation, but health, care giving, loneliness, and smoking are relatively stronger predictors of daily emotions. When plotted against log income, life evaluation rises steadily. Emotional well-being also rises with log income, but there is no further progress beyond an annual income of ∼$75,000. Low income exacerbates the emotional pain associated with such misfortunes as divorce, ill health, and being alone. We conclude that high income buys life satisfaction but not happiness, and that low income is associated both with low life evaluation and low emotional well-being.

 

Source: "High income improves evaluation of life but not emotional well-being" from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, September 7, 2010

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“You’re Nuts!” Why--And How--Impact Makers Gives Away All Its Profits

“You’re Nuts!” Why--And How--Impact Makers Gives Away All Its Profits | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Impact Makers consults for the rich, and gives to the poor. Is this the future of philanthropy?

 

Michael Pirron is the cofounder and CEO of Impact Makers. His company is a management consulting firm much like any other, but for one extreme distinguishing feature: It donates 100% of its after-tax profits to charity. Click through to read an interview...

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