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Radical Compassion
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International Symposia for Contemplative Studies

International Symposia for Contemplative Studies | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

International Symposia for Contemplative Studies – A collaborative effort among Centers and Laboratories around the world that explore the correlates and consequences of contemplative practice.  FREE WEBSTREAMING OF TALKS!

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Intelligence is Overrated: What You Really Need to Succeed, by Keld Jensen

Intelligence is Overrated: What You Really Need to Succeed, by Keld Jensen | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Albert Einstein's was estimated at 160, Madonna's is 140, and John F. Kennedy's was only 119, but as it turns out, IQ score aren't everything when it comes to predicting your success and professional achievement.
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Seven Scientific Facts That Will Change the Way You View The World. ~ Tim Illencik

Seven Scientific Facts That Will Change the Way You View The World. ~ Tim Illencik | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

“I look up at the night sky, and I know that, yes, we are part of this Universe, we are in this Universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up—many people feel small, because they’re small and the Universe is big, but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars.” – Neil deGrasse Tyson

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The Unknown Inventor Whose Work Is Saving The Developing World

The Unknown Inventor Whose Work Is Saving The Developing World | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
If you’re a lucky inventor, maybe you come up with one big thing that makes an impact on people.

 

Ashok Gadgil, the winner of the 2012 $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation, has produced two inventions that have changed the lives of people in the developing world, and is now working on a third. How has he pulled this off?

 

It helps that Gadgil, a professor in the Department of Civil Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, has a science background. But his explanation is fairly simple: "In each case it was becoming aware of how serious the problem was and then being aware that actually there is some technical solution that could help. It’s like you find a puzzle, but the nice thing about this puzzle is that if you solve it you’re making people’s lives better."

 

 

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Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, tries new approach to school discipline — suspensions drop 85%

Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, tries new approach to school discipline — suspensions drop 85% | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
THE FIRST TIME THAT principal Jim Sporleder tried the New Approach to Student Discipline at Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, he was blown away. Because it worked. In fact, it worked so well ...

 

that he never went back to the Old Approach to Student Discipline. This is how it went down:

 

A student blows up at a teacher, drops the F-bomb. The usual approach at Lincoln – and, safe to say, at most high schools in this country – is automatic suspension. Instead, Sporleder sits the kid down and says quietly:

 

“Wow. Are you OK? This doesn’t sound like you. What’s going on?” He gets even more specific: “You really looked stressed. On a scale of 1-10, where are you with your anger?”

 

The kid was ready. Ready, man! For an anger blast to his face….”How could you do that?” “What’s wrong with you?”…and for the big boot out of school. But he was NOT ready for kindness. The armor-plated defenses melt like ice under a blowtorch and the words pour out: “My dad’s an alcoholic. He’s promised me things my whole life and never keeps those promises.” The waterfall of words that go deep into his home life, which is no piece of breeze, end with this sentence: “I shouldn’t have blown up at the teacher.”

 

Whoa...

 

And then he goes back to the teacher and apologizes. Without prompting from Sporleder.

 

“The kid still got a consequence,” explains Sporleder – but he wasn’t sent home, a place where there wasn’t anyone who cares much about what he does or doesn’t do. He went to ISS — in-school suspension, a quiet, comforting room where he can talk about anything with the attending teacher, catch up on his homework, or just sit and think about how maybe he could do things differently next time.

 

Before the words “namby-pamby”, “weenie”, or “not the way they did things in my day” start flowing across your lips, take a look at these numbers:

2009-2010 (Before new approach)

798 suspensions (days students were out of school)
50 expulsions
600 written referrals


2010-2011 (After new approach)

135 suspensions (days students were out of school)
30 expulsions
320 written referrals

 

Read more... its a long article!

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Nonviolent Communication (NVC) Conference - Ventura County, CA

Nonviolent Communication (NVC) Conference - Ventura County, CA | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

See you soon in Oxnard!!!

 

Warmly,

 

Jim

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» Video: More on Building Resiliency - World of Psychology

» Video: More on Building Resiliency - World of Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Psychological resilience and resiliency are important because the more resilient a person is, the happier a life they will lead.
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Crime and punishment: Neurobiological roots of modern justice

Crime and punishment: Neurobiological roots of modern justice | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists have proposed the first neurobiological model for third-party punishment. It outlines a collection of potential cognitive and brain processes that evolutionary pressures could have re-purposed to make this behavior possible.

 

"The concepts of survival of the fittest or the selfish gene that the public generally associates with evolution are incomplete," said René Marois, associate professor of psychology at Vanderbilt, who co-authored the paper with Joshua Buckholtz, assistant professor of psychology at Harvard. "Prosociality -- voluntary behavior intended to benefit other people even when they are not kin -- does not necessarily confer genetic benefits directly on specific individuals but it creates a stable society that improves the overall survival of the group's offspring."

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Va. Tech marking 5 years since campus massacre

Va. Tech marking 5 years since campus massacre | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP) — Students were headed to class Monday at Virginia Tech, the first year the school hasn't suspended instruction to mark the anniversary of a 2007 rampage that left 32 people and the gunman dead.

 

At 9:43 a.m. Monday — the time when gunman Seung-Hui Cho began killing 30 students and professors at Norris Hall — McDonnell was calling for a moment of silence in Virginia. The Capitol Square Bell Tower in Richmond will then toll for each victim.


On campus, events will also include a community picnic on the Drillfield, a display of memorial items sent to Virginia Tech from other colleges and universities and performances. Several locations have been set aside on campus as "quiet places for reflection."

 

At Norris Hall, where Cho also killed himself, an open house was scheduled. The former classroom building is now home to the Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention.


The center was established after the killings at Norris Hall in 2009 "to transform a place of pain, suffering and violence that can prevent future violence," director James Hawdon said. The center promotes student volunteerism and "nonviolent compassionate communication" techniques, he said.

 

The center was established after the killings at Norris Hall in 2009 "to transform a place of pain, suffering and violence that can prevent future violence," director James Hawdon said. The center promotes student volunteerism and "nonviolent compassionate communication" techniques, he said.

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Why Learning Leads to Happiness - US News and World Report

Why Learning Leads to Happiness - US News and World Report | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Education, engagement, and creativity produce happier and longer lives.

 

Your mind may be the closest thing to the Holy Grail of longevity and happiness. Education has been widely documented by researchers as the single variable tied most directly to improved health and longevity. And when people are intensely engaged in doing and learning new things, their well-being and happiness can blossom.

 

This effect becomes even more valuable as we get older. Even in old age, it turns out, our brains have more plasticity to adapt and help us than was once thought. Old dogs, in short, can learn a lot of new tricks.

 

"I think most social scientists would put their money on education as the most important factor in ensuring longer lives," says psychologist Laura Carstensen, director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. People with more education get better jobs that pay more money, are less physically demanding, and provide more enjoyment. They live in safer neighborhoods, practice healthier lifestyles, and have less stress...

 

In terms of happiness, a close companion of learning is the degree of engagement people have with tasks that provide them knowledge and fulfillment. People who are intensely absorbed in a task can lose track of time and place. Hours pass like minutes. They may be tired by the task but emerge energized and happy. This condition is known as "flow," a name coined 30 years ago by psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi...

 

The benefits of learning and engagement are particularly important in promoting healthy aging. "Your mind is really like a muscle, and using it is a key" to lifelong mental health, Berkman says. There has been a surge in attention to mental exercise as a way of preventing Alzheimer's disease, for example. While the link between such efforts and disease prevention has not been definitively established, most scientists believe there is a beneficial relationship between lifelong learning and staying socially active with mental well-being and happiness later in life. Older people who become isolated can lose the activities that trigger their minds to engage in enjoyable and stimulating activities...

 

Jacquelyn James is the director of research at the Sloan Center on Aging & Work and has been overseeing an ongoing study of the benefits that older people derive from continued work. Across a span of activities—paid work, caregiving, volunteering, and education—the levels of engagement people experienced were strongly related to their enjoyment and benefits from the activity. Just being involved in an activity does not produce the benefits of engagement. And engagement needs to be connected with a sense of purpose and achievement to produce happiness.

 

"As we get older, it is more important to find things to do that light up our lives," James says. Our minds are central to this effort, and thrive when we are finding new things for them to do. Whether it's acquiring a new skill or language (very high on the list of mental acuity benefits), joining a new group and meeting new people, or finding ways to continue using existing skills, successful aging and longevity are built upon patterns of lifelong learning.

 

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Textbook example of emotionally intelligent signage | Daniel Pink

Textbook example of emotionally intelligent signage | Daniel Pink | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Back in the old days, when an international team of Ph.D. social scientists and veteran graphic designers first conceived the idea of emotionally intelligent signage in a series of secret all-night meetings in my garage*, the term had a particular meaning.

 

The idea was that signs could be more effective — that is, they were more likely to produce the desired behavior — if they: a) expressed empathy with the viewer; or b) elicited empathy in the viewer. The concept has widened a bit since then, particularly with examples of signs using humor to make their point.

 

But last week Kathleen Curry sent us a sign that meets the classic, original definition. Driving on Coleman Blvd. in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, she spotted the sign below. It reminds me of what the town of Needham, Massachusetts, did not too long ago — and it’s apparently part of a national movement.

 

Hard to say for sure whether this sort of sign will change behavior, but I’m guessing it just might.

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World Happiness Report 2012: Scandinavian Countries Are Happiest On Earth (SLIDESHOW)

World Happiness Report 2012: Scandinavian Countries Are Happiest On Earth (SLIDESHOW) | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Denmark has taken the top spot on the United Nation's first ever World Happiness Report, followed by Finland, Norway and the Netherlands.

 

The rankings in the report were based on a number called the "life evaluation score," a measurement which takes into account a variety of factors including people's health, family and job security as well as social factors like political freedom and government corruption. It also looks at measurements from previous reports on happiness from the Gallup World Poll (GWP), the World Values Survey (WVS), the European Values Survey (EVS), and the European Social Survey (ESS).

 

In the introduction to the report, co-editors John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs explain that the report aims in part to evaluate happiness based on a more comprehensive measurement system that can be used to inform policy-makers. As the Atlantic explains, previous reports on happiness have linked personal contentment to income, but that correlation has been challenged in recent years by economists who have argued that the happiness of a nation is determined by far more than its Gross National Product.

 

"While basic living standards are essential for happiness, after the baseline has been met happiness varies more with the quality of human relationship than with income," the report read. "Policy goals should include high employment and high-quality work; a strong community with high levels of trust and respect, which government can influence through inclusive participatory policies; improved physical and mental health; support of family life; and a decent education for all."

 

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NVC Research - Overview

Georgia Network for Nonviolent Communication - an overview of research done to quantify the effectiveness of NVC.

 

Findings to Date

 

The results of both studies (2010, 2011) offer valuable evidence for what we NVC-enthusiasts know – Nonviolent Communication application can and does enhance our ability to:

 

-Work together and live together with more vitality and harmony
-Handle conflict
-Respond to others with more interest and understanding

 

Enjoy the findings we share on this page and use the links to the full studies, should you want to delve into it more.

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All about Empathy:Edwin Interviews Jori Manske

All about Empathy:Edwin Interviews Jori Manske | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Jori says Empathy is like 2 hearts beating together, a salve for the heart, or walking with another in sync. Punishment and domination are the antithesis.

 

How to Build a Culture of Empathy?
1. Clarity of awareness and intention - what is empathy and why it matters.

2. Compassionate leadership - with everyone leading their own life and influencing with compassion.

3. Cultural change can happen in a society within one generation if children have a model of empathy, and education is a collaborative exploration.

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Yes, pain really is all in your head – Health – Lifestyle – New Zealand Listener

Yes, pain really is all in your head – Health – Lifestyle – New Zealand Listener | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
A revolution in brain science has led to the discovery of new ways to stop persistent pain.

 

Ken Ng was 12 when he had his left leg amputated below the knee to stop the spread of bone cancer. It was the start of a long journey of pain. Phantom sensations from his amputated limb haunted him as a teenager, including stabbing sensations and a vice-like constriction around his stump. It got worse when he moved to Wellington to begin studying for his law degree. By 2009, the sensations flooding in from his absent limb were consuming him.

 

Each day he downed a succession of prescription painkillers – codeine, tramadol, Neurofen and Voltaren. “I couldn’t really study any more, I couldn’t sit my exams. It made me introverted, I didn’t want anything to do with people. I wasn’t eating, I stopped going to lectures and the tramadol was making me hallucinate.” Ng sought help from his GP, who referred him to Capital & Coast District Health Board’s pain clinic. Luckily for Ng, the clinic had just begun to offer a simple but revolutionary new therapy, which recognises that some types of chronic pain are caused not by tissue damage but by changes in the wiring of the brain. Ng started his treatment with two weeks of computer exercises looking at pictures of right and left legs, and then began mirror therapy.

 

Ng’s occupational therapist, Maria Polaczuk, seated him with a large mirror positioned upright between his legs so it reflected his whole right leg. “All I could see was two bare normal legs. I massaged my right foot with my hands, manipulated it up and down. I was getting a sense of what a foot felt like.” As he looked at this reflected whole leg in the mirror, where usually he would see an amputated limb, something strange started to happen. “The tingling painful sensation in my stump started to fade and become less prominent.”

 

After two weeks of mirror exercises, four times a day, the phantom pain disappeared altogether. Now 22, Ng has been able to stop taking painkillers. He has had one brief attack of phantom pain, after a period of stress, but apart from that he experiences only the more routine discomfort of pressure on his stump from his prosthesis. Mirror therapy is one byproduct of a great leap forward in science’s understanding of pain and how it is manufactured in the human brain.

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» 10 Things You Can Do in 10 Minutes to Boost Happiness - World of Psychology

» 10 Things You Can Do in 10 Minutes to Boost Happiness - World of Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Self-care doesn’t require hours of free time. In fact, just 10 minutes or less can help to boost your well-being.
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The Trust Molecule

The Trust Molecule | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Why are some people trustworthy while others cheat and lie, some generous and others coldhearted louts? Part of the answer may lie in the hormone oxytocin. In an excerpt from The Moral Molecule, Paul J. Zakon the new science of morality— and how it could be used to create a more virtuous society.

 

Research that I have done over the past decade suggests that a chemical messenger called oxytocin accounts for why some people give freely of themselves and others are coldhearted louts, why some people cheat and steal and others you can trust with your life, why some husbands are more faithful than others, and why women tend to be nicer and more generous than men. In our blood and in the brain, oxytocin appears to be the chemical elixir that creates bonds of trust not just in our intimate relationships but also in our business dealings, in politics and in society at large...

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Motivating Sustainable Behaviour | Cruxcatalyst

Motivating Sustainable Behaviour | Cruxcatalyst | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Motivating Sustainable Behaviour...

 

Along with many other people, I’ve been thinking a lot about how to bring about behaviour change, and looking to psychology, neuroscience and studies on motivation and values for insights.

 

Here’s a few learnings that could help your work...

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Edwin Rutsch interview with Jim Manske: How to Build a Culture of Empathy

Edwin Rutsch interview with Jim Manske:  How to Build a Culture of Empathy | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Empathy is like being a tracker that is following the trail, or a delicious banquet; the opposite is a mechanic that is trying to fix everything.


How can we build a culture of empathy? Supporting people in creating a life-serving system within themselves, in their primary relationship, family, workplace, neighborhood, and community. Creating systems that reframe conflict as a necessary part of growth and learning while creating a framework for resolving conflict in a life-serving way.

 

http://cultureofempathy.com/References/Experts/NVC/Jim-Manski.htm

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The brain likes surprises:Alexander Kjerulf

The brain likes surprises:Alexander Kjerulf | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

According to research, we become a happier when good things happen to us (duh!) but the effect is even bigger when good things happen to us unexpectedly:

Emory University and Baylor College of Medicine researchers used Magnetic Resonance Imaging brain scans to measure changes in human brain activity in response to a sequence of pleasurable stimuli.

 

They used a computer-controlled device to squirt fruit juice or water into the mouths of 25 research participants. The patterns of the squirting were either predictable or unpredictable.

 

The researchers found that the MRI scans showed a brain area called the nucleus accumbens to be much more active when the subjects received unpredictable patterns of juice and water.

 

So:

Something nice happens that you expect = good
Something nice happens unexpectedly = even better

 

Read more...

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A MINDFUL NATION » Rep Tim Ryan

A MINDFUL NATION » Rep Tim Ryan | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it


In one of the most optimistic books to come out of Washington during these trying times, Congressman Tim Ryan presents us with an inspiring and hopeful view of our country’s future — and a roadmap for how to get there. Across America, people are feeling squeezed, exhausted, and running faster and faster while falling farther behind. The economy continues to struggle, wars rage on, and every week brings news of another environmental disaster. Everything seems broken and people feel helpless to make a difference. Despite this bleak outlook, there are strands of quiet hope and confidence. People are beginning to take action in a new way: they are slowing down, paying attention, and gaining an awareness of the inner resources at their disposal.

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Who Is Programming Your Brain? | Psychology Today

Who Is Programming Your Brain? | Psychology Today | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

What is a “personal practice,” and why do we need one? By David Smithstein

 

So what is this thing called a “practice” that is so important? Many diverse strategies  have the capacity to bring people towards a similar goal: the realization that an individual is not simply his or her thoughts; in fact, we are so much more...

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» The Burden of The Perfect Partner: A Closer Look - Healing Together for Couples

» The Burden of The Perfect Partner: A Closer Look - Healing Together for Couples | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Perfectionism is costly to individuals and couples.Partners can develop a secure attachment pattern while using strategies to reduce maladaptive perfectionism.
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John Cleese on the 5 Factors to Make Your Life More Creative

John Cleese on the 5 Factors to Make Your Life More Creative | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

'Creativity is not a talent.It is a way of operating.' Much has been said about how creativity works, its secrets, its origins, and what to optimize ourselves for it. In this excerpt from his fantastic 1991 lecture, John Cleese offers a recipe for creativity, delivered with his signature blend of cultural insight and comedic genius...

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» What Makes Life Worth Living? - Adventures in Positive Psychology

» What Makes Life Worth Living? - Adventures in Positive Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
I know it's a heavy question, but really think about it. What makes life worth living? What's most important to you? Why do you get out of bed in the morning?
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