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Doctors discover the "happy path" to sustainability

Doctors discover the "happy path" to sustainability | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Dr. Elizabeth Nisbet is an assistant professor in the Psychology Department at Trent University in Peterborough and an adjunct professor of psychology at Carleton University in Ottawa. Her work investigates 

the environmental and health benefits of individual differences in connectedness with the natural environment.


Docs Talk: Tell us a bit about your latest research on people and nature.

Dr. Nisbet: We've been studying human connectedness with nature—an idea we call "nature relatedness."

Nature relatedness involves the thoughts we have about our identity and how it includes (or does not include) the natural environment. It also involves our feelings about animals and plants, and our beliefs about how humans should use natural resources. It is informed by our experiences in nature—how comfortable we are in nature and how much time we spend there. We measure how people differ in nature relatedness (some are very drawn to nature and consider it an important part of their lives, while others are less interested) and link these differences with behaviours and well-being.

Docs Talk: What can you tell us about people who have a high sense of nature relatedness?

Dr. Nisbet: People with a strong sense of connection to nature report more happiness than those who are less connected. A high degree of nature relatedness is also associated with more environmentally protective behavior; if someone feels connected with their natural environment they are more likely to protect it. Environmental education and opportunities for nature contact are important for cultivating (or improving) connectedness. Regular time in nature is good for our physical and mental health, as well as for the planet. And as we learn more about our local ecosystems, we gain a better understanding of our interconnectedness with nature and the importance of keeping our environment healthy.

What we find inspiring about this research is that there seems to be a potential "happy path" to sustainability: the positive feelings we experience when in nature keep us coming back, motivated to protect the places we enjoy.

Docs Talk: Did any of your findings surprise you?

Dr. Nisbet: My colleagues and I were somewhat surprised to discover that despite how good nature is for our physical and mental health, we may be not be taking advantage of it. In our studies comparing the well-being effects of walking either indoors or outdoors, we found that people under-predict how happy a short walk in nature (even nearby nature, such as a city park) will make them.

We may not think of nature as a source of happiness or a mood-booster and this might be affecting our decisions about where to spend our time. Rather than surfing the Internet, checking email, or watching TV at the end of a long day, we should consider getting out into nature for a mood lift.

Docs Talk: So the take-home message is get out in nature to find happiness. Any advice for our readers?

Dr. Nisbet: The key is to make it convenient and easy. Most of us lead very busy lives and struggle to find time to relax. We need to find ways to incorporate nature time into our regular routines, so that it becomes habit, just like any other health-promoting behaviour.

Canada has spectacularly beautiful wilderness to enjoy, but we also shouldn't discount "nearby nature"—city parks, walkways, bike paths, backyards, gardens and even our pets and plants—as a source of happiness. Commuting along a bike or walking path to work, spending time with family in a nearby park or taking a midday work break outside, even for a few minutes, is good for us. The nature all around us has health and well-being benefits. Happiness is truly in our nature.

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"I have a dream... for Iceland" - News of Iceland

"I have a dream... for Iceland" - News of Iceland | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
“"I have a dream... for Iceland" News of Iceland ... Research center for Arctic studies, climate change and global warming. Research and development of electric cars. Peace conferances and peace talks.”
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Want Teamwork? Encourage Free Speech

Want Teamwork? Encourage Free Speech | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
By seeking — and appreciating — the views of the entire group, a manager can turn dubious followers into active participants in the task at hand.
Jim Manske's insight:

Thrilled to forward you all the link to an article in the NY Times by our colleague, Miki Kashtan!

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John Michel's curator insight, April 13, 7:44 PM

When leaders commit to involving the whole group, organizations are transformed. Although collaboration — or “laboring together” (collaborare in Latin) — isn’t easy, it becomes easier the more we welcome differences and even conflict in service of a larger whole. The results are higher trust, increased productivity and rich creativity.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Lie and Cheat Themselves — PsyBlog

Lied-to Children More Likely to Lie and Cheat Themselves — PsyBlog | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Most parents admit lying to their children yet, according to new research, the more children are lied to, the more they are likely to lie and cheat themselves.

 

The experiment from which these conclusions are drawn involved 186 children, around half of whom were told that there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” (Hays & Carver, 2014).

 

However, the experimenter then admitted this was just a lie to encourage them to carry out a test of their resistance to temptation.

During the actual test, the children had to try and pair up audio clips with character toys that were hidden from their view.

 

For example, there was a “Tickly me!” audio clip that paired up with Elmo.

However, there was one that was tricky, where the researchers played a snatch of Beethoven that didn’t suggest any children’s character, then ‘accidentally’ had to leave the room.

 

Before going, the experimenter explicitly told the children not to peek at the toy which was making the sound.

 

The children didn’t know it, but cameras were still rolling to capture their behaviour when alone.

 

Of the children who were not lied to, 60% did peek while the experimenter was out of the room. And 60% of those then lied about it.

 

Of those who were lied to, though, fully 80% peeked and then 90% of those children lied about peeking.

 

We don’t know exactly why this happens, but two mechanisms are likely involved:

-Children might simply be copying the adult.-Children think that because the experimenter appears to be a liar, it’s OK to lie to them.

 

The authors conclude by saying: “The actions of parents suggest that they do not believe that the lies they tell their children will impact the child’s own honesty. The current study casts doubt on that belief.

 ...grown-ups may have to re-examine what they say to kids. Even a ‘little white lie’ might have consequences.”

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For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They're Bombing

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They're Bombing | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Not just a pixel on a screen
Jim Manske's insight:
Art is the Heart of nonviolence....
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Why Fostering a Culture of Compassion in the Workplace Matters

Why Fostering a Culture of Compassion in the Workplace Matters | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Wharton’s Sigal Barsade says demonstrating “companionate love” in the workplace is vital to employee morale, teamwork and customer satisfaction.

 

Already, though, the research seems to be pointing to a strong message for managers in all industries, Barsade says: tenderness, compassion, affection and caring matter at work. “Management can do something about this,” she says. “They should be thinking about the emotional culture. It starts with how they are treating their own employees when they see them.


 ==========================

tenderness, compassion, affection
and caring matter at work.

========


Are they showing these kinds of emotions? And it informs what kind of policies they put into place. This is something that can definitely be very purposeful — not just something that rises organically.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Self Compassion: why being gentle to yourself is the foundation of happiness

Self Compassion: why being gentle to yourself is the foundation of happiness | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

By JULIA BUENO  

It took me a very long time to work out the difference between being kind to myself and actually being kind to myself. I used to think a long hot bath, a yoga class or a new pair of shoes would suffice to ease a low patch or quieten my noisy inner critic


. These gestures may have helped a bit, but they remained just that – actions representing a kindness rather than actions that also felt kind to myself when I did them. I could practise yoga for an hour and still feel bad. I might even feel rubbish at yoga and leave a class feeling even worse. Learning to be truly kind, compassionate, and even loving toward myself meant some pretty hard work.


================================

This ‘self-compassion’ starts off as a skill,
and like many other skills, a tricky one to
start with but well worth the effort put in.

===================



Via Edwin Rutsch
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Beyond Right and Wrong: A film to inspire dialog and connection

Beyond Right and Wrong:  A film to inspire dialog and connection | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Beyond Right & Wrong presents the stories of people who have experienced loss and the stories of people who have caused that loss. From the Rwandan Genocide to the Troubles in Northern Ireland to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, people from different sides of the violence have entrusted all of us with their stories—their anger or remorse, their pain, their paths to recovery.

 

 

 

Jim Manske's insight:

Inspiring film that deepens my sense of Vision and Mission.  See it for free, Share it with friends, Host an Event!  beyondrightandwrong.com

 

 

 

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PHOTO: Giraffe Shares Touching Goodbye With Dying Zoo Worker

PHOTO: Giraffe Shares Touching Goodbye With Dying Zoo Worker | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

A dying cancer patient who worked at a Dutch zoo returned to say goodbye on Wednesday. Lying in a hospital bed placed in the giraffe habitat at Rotterdam's Diergaarde Blijdorp, the 54-year-old man, identified as only Mario, waited for the animals to approach.

 

In an image now breaking the Internet's heart, one giraffe appears to understand the moment, kissing Mario.

 

 "You could see him totally light up," said Kees Veldboer, founder and director of Ambulance Wish Foundation, which arranged the farewell. "It's very special to see that those animals recognize him, and sense that he isn't doing well," he told Rotterdam newspaper Algemeen Dagblad.

Mario, who has a mental disability, spent nearly his entire life as a maintenance man at the zoo, according to the paper.

 

After the touching encounter, he then bid farewell to his colleagues, the charity reported.

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Happiness Gets Its Day

Happiness Gets Its Day | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

There are two reasons I've drawn a huge circle around March 20 on my calendar. The third Thursday of the third month is the first day of spring -- my favorite season. And, more importantly, March 20 is International Day of Happiness, a holiday commissioned by the General Assembly of the United Nations to raise awareness that well-being and happiness are fundamental to human life.

 

Both events celebrate new beginnings. Spring brings new life. International Day of Happiness brings new understanding.

When we inhale the heady perfume of baby grass and spring's first flowers, we feel a lift -- we're happy for the experience. When we decide to make gratitude or forgiveness or generosity a priority, we also feel happiness. Are the two linked? I think so.

 

Both the advent of spring and International Day of Happiness have basis in natural science. One is caused by the tilting and orbit of our planet. The other, while a man-made invention, underscores the fact that we are hardwired for happiness. Mother Nature has endowed us with a body that's capable of positive emotions, actions and expressions. When people respond to life's inevitable challenges with grace, perseverance and even joy, they inspire us. They show us that sad, painful or disappointing events can have good outcomes or unexpected silver linings. Science is showing us why some of these profoundly human characteristics are demonstrated even in difficult situations. It turns out that we can choose happiness -- for ourselves and for our world.

 

International Day of Happiness isn't about drawing smiley faces on sticky notes (which I don't do) or putting a good face on bad news (which I do sometimes), it's about hitting the "pause" button sometime during March 20 and thinking about how happiness is an essential element of a basic life.

 

It is wonderfully freeing to simply write those words: "Happiness is essential." While it is different for each of us, happiness is something we all need and deserve.

 

I saw happiness on the faces of men and women who had little in American terms, but were rich in community while on a family trip to Morocco. As our guide walked ahead of us along the clogged streets of Marrakesh, he would sometimes pause to acknowledge someone with a nod or to touch a hand. After a bit, I realized he was also dispersing some of the coins we'd paid him into those hands. This wasn't just commerce; it was also a social network. He gathered happiness from those around him and likewise, passed it back to them.

 

Happiness is not the result of wealth, health or education. Rather, it is an indicator of those things. That makes happiness a powerful tool in improving worldwide economics and the health and well-being of people all around the globe.

 

I'm going to be at the United Nations on International Day of Happiness, taking part in both formal proceedings and the free-form celebrations we've planned at public locations. Active, loud and personal endorsement of happiness is important to raise awareness of its potential positive impact on everyday life. I expect to see, hear and report on people who "vote for happiness," and I'll share those stories in our next issue. Will it be your story that I share? Mark March 20 on your calendar and go toactsofhappiness.org to learn how to get involved.

Jim Manske's insight:

Our monthly free teleclass this week-end is in honor of the UN Day of Happiness: Fueling Life, Liberty, and Happiness with Jim and Jori Manske.  Details at radicalcompassion.com

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Share This With All the Schools, Please

Share This With All the Schools, Please | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Every Friday afternoon Chase’s teacher asks her students to take out a piece of paper and write down the names of four children with whom they’d like to sit the following week. The children know that these requests may or may not be honored.
Jim Manske's insight:

I'm touched reading this teacher's strategies for cultivating connection and compassion in her classroom.  Today, Jori and I will join a group of local educators to talk about how to integrate a "No-Fault" zone in their school, right here in our neighborhood!

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NVC Internet Conference Program : simplebooklet.com

NVC Internet Conference Program  : simplebooklet.com | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
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Can You Choose Happiness? Elisha Goldstein

Can You Choose Happiness? Elisha Goldstein | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
The notion of choosing happiness can be a controversial topic, but understanding what it behind it can give us the power for real happiness.
Jim Manske's insight:

Aloha!  We are back home, refreshed after a wonderful retreat in the Bay Area.

 

Who doesn't want to be happy?

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Jose Mejia R's curator insight, March 7, 5:47 AM

TRADUCCION:
La noción de la elección de la felicidad puede ser un tema controversial, pero la comprensión de lo que hay detrás de esta noción nos puede dar el poder de la verdadera felicidad.

 

"¿Qué día es hoy"? pregunta Pooh.

"Es hoy" musita Piglet

"Mi día favorito" dice Pooh.

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A Simple Exercise to Increase Well-Being and Lower Depression from Martin Seligman, Founding Father of Positive Psychology

A Simple Exercise to Increase Well-Being and Lower Depression from Martin Seligman, Founding Father of Positive Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

You'll need pen, paper, and a silencer for cynicism.


Jim Manske's insight:

Experimentation is the antidote for cynicism.  Try these ideas for yourself and determine if they work for you.

 

See you on the gratitude channel.  ;)

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5 Mind Hacks To Better Manage Your Attitude

5 Mind Hacks To Better Manage Your Attitude | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Looking back, I can better appreciate the incredible amount of grace my parents have shown.
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Why Empathy is Essential to a Culture of Health

Why Empathy is Essential to a Culture of Health | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Empathy is the lifeblood of any system of health—it gives us all a shared stake in being healthy and helping others to thrive as well.

 

Building empathy has been a critical strategy in my household of late—not only because it helps motivate them, but also because it is an important part of their social development. Lately I have been thinking about empathy on a larger scale, beyond my household, and how critical it is to building a Culture of Health.


====================

Most people don't think about empathy
as  a key to health, but it is
profoundly important.

==========


by Tara Oakman


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Keaton Toscano's curator insight, April 13, 10:05 PM

Empathy is an important attitude to have as a teacher as well, for many reasons. You do not want your students to bring their problems into the classroom, it needs to be a safe place. You also need to empathize with the fact that you are here because you have already mastered the required material, they are trying to understand it through you. Not everyone is going to respond well to your teaching style, let alone how YOU understand the information, you'll be doing a bit of catering as a teacher, as is to be expected.

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» Mindfulness Offers Young Adults the Same Protection Against Substance Abuse as Positive Parenting - Eric Schmidt

» Mindfulness Offers Young Adults the Same Protection Against Substance Abuse as Positive Parenting  - Eric Schmidt | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Young adults who were especially mindful had the same low rates of substance abuse as young adults who were close with their parents.
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The Most Underrated Skill for Creatives? Empathy.

The Most Underrated Skill for Creatives? Empathy. | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Description
Jim Manske's insight:
Makes sense, doesn't it, that beginning with empathic listening, then connecting to needs before creating a strategy would lead to more connection?
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The Leading Edge of Peace: Our Evolutionary Path Forward

The Leading Edge of Peace: Our Evolutionary Path Forward | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
If this burgeoning field of peacebuilding is to reach full potential, we must help catalyze and galvanize a movement behind it and create much stronger systems and infrastructure to support it....
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Why Normal Is a Myth~Agustín Fuentes, Ph.D.

Why Normal Is a Myth~Agustín Fuentes, Ph.D. | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

The myth of normal tells us that that being within the range of what is considered "normal" is a core feature of successfully being a member of society—and that is simply not true. The myth of normal is very strong and very wrong. 

 

Being “normal” is usually assessed by one’s being in or around the average for any given trait: height, weight, body type, sexuality, physicality, sociability, etc. And we largely assume that, with a few exceptions, it is best to be as normal as possible to fit in with those around you. In this notion, the average for any given trait, and maybe one, or two, standard deviations from that norm is fine, but once you get far away from the average, there is something wrong—you are not being human the right way.

 

This premise results from two misconceptions:

A very poor understanding of the range and patterns of actual human biological and behavioral variation.An assumption that the average in any population or group is more or less a measure of the “right” biological and social way to be. 

The insidious social practice that emerges from these two misconceptions is the tendency of social groups, and societies at large, to punish or peripheralize those individuals who fall outside of what is considered “normal”—often with serious psychological and social impacts on those consequently labeled/recognized as “deviant.”

 

Many have argued that this tendency to ostracize those outside of the norm is just a reflection of our evolutionary ancestry—our tendency to be more comfortable with those more “like us” and to be wary of those not “like us.” This may well be the case, but what if the modern myth of normal has overshot our basic evolutionary history of wariness toward the unknown? What if it has inserted an overly narrow vision, by defining what is “normal” and “right” within groups and populations in much too constricted a range?

 

The current myth of normal tries to extinguish the very variation (biological and behavioral) that is core to our species’ ability to evolve and adapt to so many different challenges.

 

There are some extreme variants in human biology and behavior that are truly problematic in serious ways (neurological defects and pathological psychoses, for example). But those are few and far between. Here, in tackling the myth of normal, I am talking about our overemphasis on constraining the range of human variation into too narrow a band—mistaking “average” for a value statement, and forgetting that it is merely a statistical description.

 

For example, we often think about things like “normal” weight, height, and gender-specific behavior as indicators of physical, psychological, and social health, but are they? What is “normal” in this context?

 

Let’s use a straightforward example: Height and weight. Humans as a species are enormously variable, with some populations averaging under five feet in height and others averaging over six feet; and, on average, men are about 10-15 percent larger than women. So there is a huge range in our species and some patterns, based on sex. Within any single population we expect to see less overall variation in height than in the whole species, but the same pattern based on sex. However, even within a relatively homogenous population there can be substantial variation in height.

 

Consider: If you line up all males and female adults in a population, there is usually about a 70 percent overlap in height—meaning that the statistically average male is taller than the statically average female. However, if you actually go out and select thousands of individual people at random in this population and just look at their heights in he absence of any other data, you are going to be able to accurately determine their sex by their height alone only about 30 percent of the time. Yes, the tallest are likely to be men and the shortest, women—but this does not get you anywhere near 100 percent of the actual variation. This means that being a tall woman or a short man, while statistically out of the norm, is not by any means uncharacteristic—or abnormal. It is a regular part of the distribution of variation. Tall women and short men are normal.

 

Weight is even more complicated. Currently we use BMI (the relationship of height to weight) as a measure of overall health. This assumes that there are easily identifiable, and normal, relationships between height and weight in regards to being a healthy human. But weight and health, while related, is not a simple relationship, and BMI does not differentiate between a body builder and a couch potato whose height and weight may be the same but for very different reasons. It is very apparent that while BMI does work for those at the very extreme of the height/weight relationship range, it is not a great measure of health in most of its range.

 

If we are getting “normal” so wrong for things as easy to measure and understand as height and weight, what about things like gender identity, sociability, imaginative interests, etc.? Is there one average (and thus “right”) way to be a boy or a girl? No. Gender is a highly complex and broad spectrum with individuals being a mix of a range of elements from across the feminine-masculine spectrum—average patterns exist, but they are statistical measures, not assessments of happiness, success and contentment. Should everyone be expected to feel more or less the same in social situations, have more or less the same number and types of friends? Of course not—there are many feasible options for sociability, and most people within that broad range do just fine. Is it evolutionarily, socially, or psychologically better to force oneself to be interested in the books, movies, themes, and ideas that are held as “normal” in a given society? It might make some people more comfortable, but it does not necessarily lead to flourishing and happiness in most individuals.

 

It is the very human ability to range far and wide in body and mind that has enabled us to do so well as a species, and the myth of normal cuts that range down to a minimal “norm.” Again, I am not arguing that anything goes—rather, that by continuously imagining that there is a direct connection between the statistical norm and the “right” way to be, we are making the lives of many people, across the range of variation for any given trait more difficult, and denying them a seat at the table. 

 

Humans are remarkably diverse—it has served us well in the past, it is with us in the present, and it will benefit us in the future. Don’t deny variability: Enjoy your spot at any place on the continuum and know that being different is in fact a normal part of being human.

 

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Developing a “Buddha Brain” through gratitude | Rick Hanson, PhD

Developing a “Buddha Brain” through gratitude | Rick Hanson, PhD | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

 

A ”buddha brain” is one that knows how to be deeply happy, loving, and wise. We develop ourselves in this way by cultivating wholesome qualities and uprooting unwholesome ones. In a sense, we plant flowers and pull weeds in the garden of the mind – which means that we are gradually changing the brain for the better.

 

Gratitude is a powerful tool in this “garden” since what you rest your attention upon is what will shape your brain the most. That’s because “neurons that fire together, wire together.” Gratitude shifts your attention away from resentment, regret, and guilt – and therefore stops you from building up the neural substrates of these known factors of mental and physical health problems. Gratitude also focuses your awareness on positive things, simple good facts such as having enough water to drink, the laughter of children, the kindness of others, or the smell of an orange.

 

To reap the rewards of gratitude, rest your attention on a good fact, noticing details about it, staying with it for at least a few seconds in a row. Then allow a natural emotional response of gratitude to arise. Continue to pay attention to this feeling of gratitude for another few seconds – or even longer: it’s delicious! Taking these few extra seconds will help you weave gratitude into the fabric of your brain and your Self. And you can practice gratitude both on the fly, as you move through your day, and at specific occasions, such as at meals or just before bed.

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Quantifying Happiness: Tracking Well-Being in the Age of Quantified Self | HL7 Standards

Quantifying Happiness: Tracking Well-Being in the Age of Quantified Self | HL7 Standards | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
For the International Day of Happiness, Angela Dunn takes a look at how we track happiness and well-being in the "Age of Quantified Self". Popular mHealth apps.
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International Day of Happiness

International Day of Happiness | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
In 2012, the United Nations (UN) declared March 20 to be observed as the International Day of Happiness.
Jim Manske's insight:

Yay!  Let's celebrate happiness all week!

and Happy St. Patrick's Day to you all!

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» Sacred Longing: The Wisdom of Embracing Our Desires - World of Psychology

» Sacred Longing: The Wisdom of Embracing Our Desires - World of Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Many of us grew up in religions that warned about the perils of desire. Greed and gluttony are two of the seven deadly sins that imperil our soul. Buddhism, which many view as a psychology more than a religion, is often understood as teaching that desire is the root cause of suffering; the path toward liberation is one of freeing ourselves from its seductive grip.

 

No doubt, our desires and longings have brought a heap of trouble with them. But an open question remains: is suffering created by desire itself or how we relate to it? Perhaps it is how we engage with desire — or fail to engage with it in a wise and skillful way — that generates the bulk of our discontent.

 

Desire has gotten a bum rap. Without desire, we wouldn’t be here. Since desire has the awesome power to create life, how could it be anything other than sacred? As psychiatrist and Buddhist teacher Mark Epstein puts it in his book, Open to Desire: Embracing a Lust for Life: “To set desire up as the enemy and then try to eliminate it is to seek to destroy one of our most precious human qualities.”

 

According to Buddhism, “tanha” creates suffering. This Pali term has often been translated as desire, but “craving” is a more accurate translation. A psychological equivalent would be compulsion or addiction. We often cling to substances, activities, or things that distract us from seeing things clearly and impede our connection with ourselves and others.

 

For example, craving excessive carbohydrates or sugar might bring temporary pleasure, but they are poor substitutes for our desire for love. Craving alcohol might numb us to our pain, while offering a surge of pleasant sensations. But this addiction comes with an obvious cost and does not satisfy the deeper needs of our soul.

 

Differentiating between craving and desire might alleviate any shame we might feel to honor and pursue our human longings. Greed, gluttony, and craving might be understood as secondary reactions to our frustrated, primary longing for love, intimacy, acceptance, and respect. When our longing to love is thwarted, we may get consumed by a search for power, wealth, or fleeting pleasures that take us on a journey away from ourselves and life.

 

Differentiating between craving and desire might alleviate any shame we might feel to honor and pursue our human longings. The scientific research that led to Attachment Theory, pioneered by John Bowlby, tells us that we’re wired with a need for connection — what he calls human attachment. Without strong bonds, our immune system languishes and we’re more prone to anxiety, depression, and other ills.

 

A useful and illuminating practice is to inquire into the nature of our desires, exploring what they’re about. As Buddhist teacher and psychologist Tara Brach explains in her book, Radical Acceptance:

 

“Longing, fully felt, carries us to belonging. The more times we traverse this path — feeling the loneliness or craving, and inhabiting its immensity — the more the longing for love becomes a gateway into love itself.”

 

As we welcome our longings and uncover how they’re guiding us, we might find that our deepest longing is to love and be loved. Now, how can that be anything other than sacred? Our challenge is to welcome our experience just as it is — exploring which desires lead to suffering and which ones lead us toward greater connection, openness, and freedom.

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Think Like a 5-Year-Old to Start Living the Life of Your Dreams

Think Like a 5-Year-Old to Start Living the Life of Your Dreams | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
How do you push past your insecurities and start believing in yourself again? Channel your inner five-year-old to start living the life of your dreams.
Jim Manske's insight:

I remember the wonder of being five!  How about you?  The world was one big playground filled with the unexpected, the delightful, the painful, and my inner critic was not yet formed.

 

Touching those memories and mapping that experience into the present opens me up to unlimited possibilities.

 

And for you?

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Six Habits of Highly Empathic People

Six Habits of Highly Empathic People | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
We can cultivate empathy throughout our lives, says Roman Krznaric—and use it as a radical force for social transformation.
Jim Manske's insight:

Aloha, Friends,

 

May we all benefit from developing these habits!

 

By the way, this may be last update for about a week or so as I am beginning a retreat.

 

Mahalo,

 

Jim

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