Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America
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Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior

Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
Can a regimen of no playdates, no TV, no computer games, and hours of music practice create happy kids? And what happens when they fight back? An exclusive excerpt from Amy Chua's "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother."
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A Different Mirror by Ronald Takaki: Ethnocentric Mentality Persists

A Different Mirror by Ronald Takaki: Ethnocentric Mentality Persists | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
Reading A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America by Ronald Takaki as a young American who was taught to believe the United States is “the land of opportunity,” contained information t...
Leah Schummer's insight:

Comprehensive Overview of Tataki 

 

The author presents Ronald Tataki's arguments in a clear and logical way. It sets up the idea of the "conquerer" and the "conquered" and how there is always going to be a more superior group in society. A thorn was when the author realized that even the Declaration of Independence did not speak the truth when it said, "all men are created equal". Not only does this apply to the extremes of the spectrum or the idea that most Americans think (slavery, Civil Rights movement, etc) but everyone who is not white.  It was also difficult to think that the creators of this nation were trying to protect themselves and their power by creating this exclusivity. I would like to read more about Ronald Tataki and research more about model minority. 

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Jeremy Lin row reveals deep-seated racism against Asian Americans

Jeremy Lin row reveals deep-seated racism against Asian Americans | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
Hadley Freeman: The racism directed at NBA Asian American basketball player Jeremy Lin has been quite something to behold
Leah Schummer's insight:

Invisible Racism 

 

This article talks about the racism towards Asian Americans and how it has finally caught this nations attention. Racism towards people of Asian descent has always existed but has never been talked or acknowledged until the basketball sensation labeled Jeremy Lin's success as "Linsanity". Because racist slurs and actions towards Asian Americans have not been as confronted as racism towards African Americans or Latinos//Hispanics, people do not consider it as being racist. I chose this piece because I have been following Jeremy Lin's experience as a NBA basketball player. I know that racism towards Asian Americans have not been confronted in the media or even in individual settings and I want to know WHY. Is this part of the culture? Is something stopping all of us Asians from confronting people and telling them to STOP with all of the mean jokes? Why can't we stand up for ourselves? We need to stop being the victims if we want to see change. 

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How the Rules of Racism Are Different For Asian Americans

How the Rules of Racism Are Different For Asian Americans | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
Matthew Salesses reflects upon the moment he realized he was not white, and explores the ways in which racism against Asians Americans is nearly invisible in our culture.
Leah Schummer's insight:

Feeling like an Outsider 

 

This author writes about his experience in trying to find who he is as a person as an adopted Asian American into a white family. His speaks about the racial stereotyping and bullying he faced from his closest friends and the frustrations of internal racism as a result of those experiences. It was heartbreaking that he lost his closest friend because of race based differences and I really resonate with his struggles of physically identifying as an Asian American even though he thinks of himself as White. Another thorn is the impact of those friends actions - though the author is still hurt from their actions after so many years, those people probably do not even remember the racist jokes and actions that have scarred him. Also, as a joke, one of his peers joked during a seminar at Harvard and said “Nobody ever talks about Asians, Asians don’t exist in Sociology.” Though the author laughed at this, he couldn’t help but realize that this was true. 

 

Why don’t Asians have a greater presence in society? Why is everything so negative around Asian Americans? 

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Danny Chen - The New York Times

Danny Chen - The New York Times | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
News about Danny Chen. Commentary and archival information about Danny Chen from The New York Times.
Leah Schummer's insight:

Suicide of an Asian-American Soldier 

 

I chose this piece because it showed another side of racial-profiling as racial hazing and the harsh truth//reality of being a minority. The story of Danny Chen is devastating and one that is not heard of often. A lot of times, it is the LGBTQ community that you hear about with military suicides, especially when it comes to the issue of acceptance in the military. I actually do not know a lot about diversity within the military but I thought it was a good step backwards from Racial Profiling to show the level of racism directed towards Asians and Asian Americans in this country. I would like to examine more racism towards Asian Americans to get to the root of Racial Profiling. I would also like to examine some more extreme cases that may or may not have led to unfortunate situations and see the publics reactions to these events. I think a lot of Middle Easterner or Latino Racial Profiling is popular in the media and I know that Asian Americans do get racial profiled but I want to know what the reasons are for not being super popular in the media. Does it occur significantly less or do people not present it? Why? 

 

I learned// was reminded of difficult Asian family dynamics especially if one person is in the American military. I also realized that this case is just as significant as any other person taking their life, yet, I had never heard of it - this brings me back to my previous question of why it was never presented in a way that would grab the publics attention. 

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Shanique Stewart's curator insight, April 27, 2015 3:25 AM

An army private killed himself after being hazed by fellow soldiers. I find this very disturbing that the Sgt who was on trial only got 30 days in prison. 

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Blog: One Asian American perspective on Zimmerman, Trayvon - AALDEF

Blog: One Asian American perspective on Zimmerman, Trayvon - AALDEF | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
Leah Schummer's insight:

Racial Profiling and how it relates to Asian Americans 

 

Asian Americans shouldn’t continue to feel indifferent towards the Trayvon Martin case because it is about racial profiling and it happens to Asian Americans on the daily - just on a different scale. The KTVU racially discriminatory slip about the Pilots on the Asiana flight that crashed at SFO last summer is a perfect example of racial profiling or race related jokes. The author makes a point that all people of color are “not safe” until “we control the use of racial profiling by law enforcement and their surrogates.” He also says that it makes sense for “Asian Americans to stand in solidarity” for Trayvon Martin and for all people of color. 

 

I think dissecting the Trayvon Martin case and trying to imagine the situation if both Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman were Asian was a thorn for me. Another one is my re-examination the KTVU slip on the Pilots names. Initially I didn’t feel offended as an Asian for the mistakes made by KTVU because I felt that the slip up was more of an insult to Koreans. However, I am now thinking about it as an insult to all Asians and am realizing the magnitude of racial profiling against Asians. It is making me think that there are thousands of other cases of Racial Profiling but they are just not on a big of a scale as the Trayvon Martin case. 

 

What are some other cases of Asian//Asian American racial profiling? Why aren’t they talked about as much? Also, why doesn’t anyone speak up about it? 

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Four takeaways from Tuesday’s Census income and poverty release

Four takeaways from Tuesday’s Census income and poverty release | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
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Parallels Between Statistics and Racial Profiling 

 

I chose this piece because I thought it would give me some more insight into why racial profiling occurs. This article presents statistics on the median annual income in different racial households and provides more statistical information that I was lacking previously. I knew that Asians and Caucasians statistically had a greater income than other racial groups in the United States, though I did not know how much. When compared and paralleled with Racial Profiling, I am surprised to see that some occurrences of Racial Profiling, whether it be department store employees acting suspicious when a Person of Color buys an extremely expensive handbag (Barney’s New York Scandal) are in some correspondence with actual statistics. In this census, it is shown that African American households earn much less than the average White and Asian households. Therefore, the Racial Profiling, though not justifiable by any means, is in correspondence with actual fact. This is extremely interesting. I would like to examine other parallels that might exist between Racial Profiling and income levels. I would also like to hear opinions about this issue and accounts of personal experience. I learned some actual statistics from this article along which has inspired some other areas of interest in my research. 

 

Just as a side note, I took some offense to the sentence, “Asian-Americans tend to have more people living in their households than do other race groups, which may account for some of the gap in median income.” Though this might be true, it read in a way that was somewhat undermining the abilities of Asian Americans to work hard and earn a significant income. 

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People's Blog for the Constitution » The Center for Constitutional Rights rolls out new weapons in the fight against “stop & frisk”

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The Hunted and the Hated: An Inside Look at the NYPD's Stop-and-Frisk Policy

A secret audio recording of a stop-and-frisk in action sheds unprecedented light on a practice that has put the city's young people of color in the NYPD's cr...

Via Tomás Jacquez
Leah Schummer's insight:

Secrets kept from the Public (ginger root) 

 

I knew very little or had a basic understanding of “Stop and Frisk”  when I first watched this video. I chose it because it had more than 3 million views on YouTube and thousands of comments below, suggesting it was a very controversial and important video. From watching this video and reading a couple of other articles, I know that the “Stop and Frisk” policy in New York City is a topic of controversy, especially leading up to the political race for mayor in New York City. I want to know what motivates these policemen and when it started to become a very big problem. Do policemen know they are sometimes feared by civilians? Are their judgments always based on race or suspicious people? Do the statistics of Stop and Frisk change as demographics of cities change? (ex. San Francisco has a lot of Asian Americans - does that mean that policemen would start to stop Asian Americans or do they always target Latinos, African Americans and Middle Easterners?) What stereotypes//ideas causes them to choose these groups of people? 

 

I know now that “Stop and Frisk” is not only a common occurrence in New York but in other parts of the country as well. It seems as though a lot of the stops are based on no reason at all and is just for the policemen to gain more power among their social group at work. It seems to be motivated by power and authority within the police community. A form of bullying perhaps? Another interesting but horrifying aspect is that a lot of policemen know and realize that this is wrong, yet, they allow it to continue because it is a part of their job. Why are systems that are supposed to protect our civilians, actually hurting them? 

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Germany: the well-integrated Vietnamese | European Journal - YouTube

The Vietnamese community in Germany is widely considered the country's most successful immigrant population. But it pays a high price for that reputation.Mor...
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Similar (but less racist?) Phenomenon Occurring in Germany 

 

The title of this video is called Germany: “Well-Integrated Vietnamese” and presents Vietnamese families who have created a life for themselves in Germany. The opportunities for them are much higher in Germany. The video says that the son “is out-performing all of his German classmates” and that “he gave up a possible career in soccer to concentrate on his studies”. It gives a good insight into the life of the Vietnamese community in Germany but I wish it would delve deeper into some more race oriented discussion. I wish it would show interactions between him and his friends and I am curious to see what type of racism exists in Germany, if any. I am surprised to hear about an Asian community in Germany (I’m not sure why) and I am curious to learn more. I am worried about people thinking that the lives of these Vietnamese families are incredibly easy compared to the lives they had in Vietnam. I also think their presentation of Germany as being a very multi-cultural country and accepting country is a bit dangerous because any immigrant family, life is going to be hard whether is be an issue of language or cultural assimilation. 

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Kate Rigg - Racial Bias and Asian America on Dr Phil

Excerpted from Dr Phils explosive special on hidden racial bias in america featuring commentary from asian american stand up comic and actor Kate Rigg who al...
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This video from four years ago shows a shocking amount of racial bias in educated adults in this country. 

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Asian-American Students Bullied More Than Those In Any Other Ethnic Group

Asian-American Students Bullied More Than Those In Any Other Ethnic Group | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
For the most part, the instance of student victimization in schools has fallen since 1995, according to a new report by the National Center for Educational Statistics. But the problem persists.
Leah Schummer's insight:
Asian-American Students and Bullying This article shows that even though bullying in schools have gone down, bullying is still a very prevalent problem. According to a recent study, Asian-American students are more likely to be bullied than any other student in school. A lot of this bullying happens online and a few comments talk about how students should not have a social media presence to begin with, therefore eliminating the chance of a child getting bullied. Other comments say that because Asian-American students are so overachieving and successful in school, they become easy targets for bullying. I think this relates to the article about the “Rise of the Tiger Nation: Asian-American Success” because white people or other ethnic groups see Asian-Americans as threats. As a student, I hate to hear about students who are bullied because they do well in school. If anything, they should be greatly awarded for their successes, not bullied! I also see this as extremely problematic because students at such a young age are encouraging racial stereotypes. They are encouraging and buying into the idea of racial stereotypes and racial profiling and I think it would be interesting to see the teacher//education side of this. What is the protocol for teachers who see racism//racial profiling//bullying occur in their classrooms? How can we make the classroom a safer place for everyone?
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Rise of the Tiger Nation: Asian-American Success

Rise of the Tiger Nation: Asian-American Success | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
Asian-Americans are now the country's best-educated, highest-earning and fastest-growing racial group. They share with American Jews both the distinction and the occasional burden of immigrant success.
Leah Schummer's insight:

Rising Population of Asian Americans 

 

This article introduces statistics about Asian-Americans in the United States. The Asian-American population is the fastest growing race than any other race and has the highest average income of $66,000 per year compared with Whites who earn $54,000, Hispanics with $40,000 and Blacks with $33,300. Interestingly, Lee Siegel, the author of this article, compares//contrasts Asian-American immigrants with immigrant Jewish families in the way they have accomplished and succeeded in creating stability in this country. The difference, however, is that Asian Americans are coming to the United States with higher education while Jewish Americans came to the US “without a penny to their name.”

 

A thorn and something that I have already witnessed is “how long [Asian-Americans] will be able to resist attracting the furies of fear and envy, especially during times of economic stress, or of economic and political conflict with countries like China, where the preponderance of Asian-Americans still come from.” I think it will be interesting to relate this to classroom or academic settings where sometimes racial stereotypes such as “Asians are good at math” come up. Are the micro-agressions aimed towards Asian Americans in those situations because people are envious or fearful of the power that Asian Americans might have? I saw this quote as another thorn; “For the purposes of demographic studies, Asian-Americans are defined as Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese, with the Chinese being the largest group and the Japanese the smallest.” As a Japanese student, I feel like the category of Asian-American is extremely broad especially considering the fact that the Japanese population in this country is extremely small. I have had instances where I have been labeled as Asian-American and I guess in general, I am Asian-American. However, I feel as though some of these statistics don’t apply to me because I am not that ethnic group, though I am the same race of Asian. I know of a lot of Chinese-American stereotypes but I feel as though I am not quite sure where Japanese people fit. Though I do not know what I will gain from researching Japanese-American stereotypes//or what people think of us, but I feel like my ethnicity is not properly represented when it is categorized under “Asian-American" because it is such a broad category, mostly representing Chinese-Americans. 

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Shanique Stewart's curator insight, April 27, 2015 3:16 AM

This article speaks about Jeremy Lin, a successful basketball player and also a graduate of Harvard University. 

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New Census Bureau Interactive Map Shows Languages Spoken in America - Education - Newsroom - U.S. Census Bureau

New Census Bureau Interactive Map Shows Languages Spoken in America - Education - Newsroom - U.S. Census Bureau | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
New Census Bureau Interactive Map Shows Languages Spoken in America
Leah Schummer's insight:

Does this have any correspondence with Racial Profiling? //more or less racial profiling if there are more//less of those people living in those areas? 

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South Asian New Yorkers Speak Out Against Stop and Frisk - COLORLINES

South Asian New Yorkers Speak Out Against Stop and Frisk - COLORLINES | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
Because they’re being targeted, too.
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San Diego Police and Racial Profiling, By the Numbers | Speak City ...

San Diego Police and Racial Profiling, By the Numbers | Speak City ... | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
The San Diego Police Department hasn't followed its own policy on collecting racial data on the people officers pull over during traffic stops. It's a key finding of our investigation into the department's approach to racial profiling ...
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Driving While Black

Driving While Black | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
“Stop and frisk” isn’t just a reality in New York City. New data shows how police target African Americans on highways across America.
Leah Schummer's insight:

Are the police actually our enemies? (broccoli) 

 

This article introduces the concept of “Stop and Frisk” that occurs all across the nation. This policy is a system where Police Officers will “stop, question and frisk people they deem suspicious, usually with zero evidence that they’ve committed a crime.” “Stop and Frisk” was largely supported by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg who claimed that it reduced the crime rate in New York City. However, it is shown in this article that this is far from the truth. Through a series of surveys it is evident that the “Stop and Frisk” policy has made racial minority groups fear the police rather than trust and rely on them for protection. Readers comments suggest even more fear of the police (coupled with own personal examples) as well as a lot of shock from people who did not realize this was happening. Some people claim that Stop and Frisk does not only occur on the streets of America but also in Corporate America, where people of color are being closely watched for their office behavior. I was always told that Policemen are there to protect me and will help me with whatever I need. However, reading this article and the fear that people have of policemen - the language that they use, their attitude towards racial minorities, and their general judgment - I feel less safe. Though I have had a close encounter or a bad experience with police, their actions and how they treat people is frightening. It makes me agree with a lot of the comments and challenges me to question the system and the motives of the police who practice “Stop and Frisk” on streets. 

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Airport Profiling: A Familiar Story for Muslims - Huffington Post (blog)

Airport Profiling: A Familiar Story for Muslims - Huffington Post (blog) | Racial Profiling on Asian Americans in America | Scoop.it
Airport Profiling: A Familiar Story for Muslims
Huffington Post (blog)
When police officers want to do racial profiling in the streets in Arizona or in Harlem, there is an outcry of people talking about how it's not the American way to do so.
Leah Schummer's insight:

“Random Screening” vs. “Stop and Frisk”  (yucca) 

 

The author hopes that he will be “lucky” on this particular day and not be searched as he goes through the airport TSA scan, suggesting that he is always being searched or suspected. Unfortunately, he is called over, and is told that it is a “random search.” He takes issue with this because it happens to him every single time he goes through the airport. Even more frustratingly, the TSA officers always tell him that it is random and not because he is Muslim, has dark skin, or has Azeem Khan as a name. He is upset because it is so obvious and clear to him why he is being chosen for the search. He is even more upset because people don’t talk about why he is being searched. No one stands up for him, not even himself. He just lets them search through all his things, answers all of their questions and does an extra scan. The thorns of this article is the fact that as a Muslim, he is grouped together with the stereotype that all Muslims are “bad and evil” and he therefore has to suffer through extra surveillance and other public searches. Another thorn is that no one is standing up against these searches. Personally, I would have wished that the author would have done some research on the topic and delved deeper into the statistics of airport surveillance among Muslims. It would be interesting to hear other Muslim perspectives and how they deal with racial profiling, whether it be to get on an airplane or just in everyday life. 

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