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Quirky (with a dash of genius)!
I love all things quirky but especially when combined with a dash of genius! Help me share the beautiful quirky genius in this world!
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10 Common Facial Expressions Explained

10 Common Facial Expressions Explained | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
The alleged universality of facial expressions has been debated since Darwin. Some seem more universal, while the more nuanced emotions can get lost in translation between cultures.
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T-shirts to encourage children to massage your back

T-shirts to encourage children to massage your back | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
Here are the "Play Mat T-Shirts", some t-shirts to encourage your children to massage your back! With playmat with roads and railways drawn on the back, these t
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A huge beached whale in the heart of London

A huge beached whale in the heart of London | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
Londoners were surprised to discover a giant whale beached on the banks of the Thames in the heart of London! But this gigantic 17 meters long cetacean is act
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Congressional hearing on Safe Streets Act highlights policy flexibility and safety | Smart Growth America

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WATCH: Jaw-Dropping Vertical Forest

WATCH: Jaw-Dropping Vertical Forest | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
Milan, one of the trendsetting capitals of the world, is applying their avant-garde tactics off the runway as well with 'vertical forests'.
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Heart Cells Can Be Coaxed to Regenerate at Low Rates

Heart Cells Can Be Coaxed to Regenerate at Low Rates | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
New research shows that the heart does have a limited ability to heal itself, and that small snippets of RNA can be used to stimulate this capacity...
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Galaxy Grande: Milky Way May Be More Massive Than Thought

Galaxy Grande: Milky Way May Be More Massive Than Thought | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
Hubble observations of a speedy galaxy weigh on the Milky Way and indicate that our galaxy is at least a trillion times as massive as the sun...
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The WEIRD Psychology of Elephants

The WEIRD Psychology of Elephants | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it

A group of researchers from Tokyo and Berlin have published a new finding about the relationship between personality and genetics in captive elephants. They collected genetic information from the blood, feces, tissues, cheek swabs, or hair of 196 Asian (Elephas maximus) and African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in Japanese, American, and Canadian zoos, and sanctuaries in Thailand. Personality information was collected for a seventy-five of those elephants by distributing to questionnaires to their keepers. Each elephant was assessed by more than one keeper.

 

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Amazing Lego Contraption

Amazing Lego Contraption | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it

This new device does little more than move plastic balls from one place to another, but we relish its sheer complexity. The machine took 600 hours to make and moves the balls around a 31-meter-long pathway.

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Bioluminescent mushrooms glow

Bioluminescent mushrooms glow | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it

In the din of a faraway rainforest, human capacity for fairy tales and fright can be rekindled by extremely distant cousins to our own kingdom. Luis Morgado told the tale:

“…in the night of the tropical rainforest we found something that would make even the most rational scientist wonder about the magical world.”

Using bioluminescent light, fungus attract insects to help spread spores in the still air of the dense rainforest – and spread that magical sense of awe biologists in a new ecosystem experience.

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Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.

 

The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 

 

Tags: geospatial, space, remote sensing, scale, perspective. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 10, 2013 11:07 AM

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

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Eternal Clock Could Keep Time After Universe Dies

Eternal Clock Could Keep Time After Universe Dies | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
The idea for an eternal clock that would continue to keep time even after the universe ceased to exist has intrigued physicists. However, no one has figured out how one might be built, until now.
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Top 10 Most Bizarre Scientific Stories

Top 10 Most Bizarre Scientific Stories | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
Some of the most mind-blowing experiments in history weren’t, technically speaking, successful—many either failed to achieve what they intended, or achieved something far stranger than the experimenter could have ever imagined.
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Sushi Donuts – Donut versions of sushi in Thailand

Sushi Donuts – Donut versions of sushi in Thailand | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
Here are the Sushi Donuts, or the donuts versions of sushi created by Mister Donuts, the asian donuts chain found in Japan or Thailand. Currently reserved to T
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Aviation in 1913: Images from Scientific American 's Archives [Slide Show]

Aviation in 1913: Images from Scientific American 's Archives [Slide Show] | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
A look at the state of flight in 1913 from the archives of Scientific American
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Sprinkled Nanocubes Could Hold Light Tight for Efficient Solar Panels

Sprinkled Nanocubes Could Hold Light Tight for Efficient Solar Panels | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
A device based on scattered silver cubes could scale up light absorption for solar power...
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EU stages cyber-attack simulation

EU stages cyber-attack simulation | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it
The European Union stages what it says is its biggest security exercise involving a DDoS attack on banks and other organisations.
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Super-Toxic Snake Venom Could Yield New Painkillers

Super-Toxic Snake Venom Could Yield New Painkillers | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it

A bite from the black mamba snake (Dendroaspis polylepis) can kill an adult human within 20 minutes. But mixed in with that toxic venom is a new natural class of compound that could be used to help develop new painkillers.

 

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Silk-Based Electronics Dissolve on Cue for Vanishing Medical Implants

Silk-Based Electronics Dissolve on Cue for Vanishing Medical Implants | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it

Imagine an electronic medical implant that, like dissolvable stitches, could disintegrate after it is no longer needed. An innovative combination of silk and silicon have now been used to create just such ephemeral but effective devices, including diodes, transistors, mini heaters and stress sensors.

 

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Warning: Genetically Modified Humans

Warning: Genetically Modified Humans | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it

A revolution was occurring. For the first time in 3.6 billion years, life had subverted the evolutionary process and began to steer it not with natural selection, but artificial selection.

 

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The Living Bridge

In North East India just north of Bangladesh is the province of Meghalaya. 

 

This is an astounding video that shows a (literally) natural way that local people have adapted to an incredibly flood-prone environment.  The organic building materials prevent erosion and keep people in contact during times of flood.  The living bridges are truly a sight to behold. 

 

Tags: environment, environment adapt, SouthAsia, water, weather climate, indigenous.


Via Seth Dixon
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megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:38 PM

This video is so cool. It shows the indigenous people using the enviroment to the fullest. THese resourceful people do not even kill the tree when they use it to build the living bridges to cross over the rough waters. They actually have a community of living bridges that help the people to get from point a to point b safely. They keep the bridges alives by intertwinning them with one another to hold them up across the water. THe video itself is too cool, especially that people even thought of this!

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:16 PM

This is so, so awesome.  These people have suffered at the hands of nature for generations and now they have figured out how to use nature to solve the problem.  They have constructed bridges with trees that takes hundreds of years to fully form so they pass it through their family generations to make life easier.  India endures a harrowing monsoon season with many floods and landslides every year and these bridges will help the people to carry on with their lives above the river's reach. These people indigeous to the region deserve so much credit for the innovative ways they have discovered to deal with nature in it's angriest forms.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 11:01 PM

This video shows how innovative people can be due to physical geography. In Northeast India, monsoon season creates raging rivers and floods which destroy the banks and wash away any normal bridges. The people of the Meghalaya province have devised a creative solution which solves both problems. By planting strangling fig plants, the roots reinforce the river banks and are then coaxed across the river creating a living bridge which can last for centuries.

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Genome Brings Ancient Girl to Life

Genome Brings Ancient Girl to Life | Quirky (with a dash of genius)! | Scoop.it

In a stunning technical feat, an international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of an archaic Siberian girl 31 times over, using a new method that amplifies single strands of DNA. The sequencing is so complete that researchers have as sharp a picture of this ancient genome as they would of a living person's, revealing, for example that the girl had brown eyes, hair, and skin. . . .


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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PatrickHance's comment, September 22, 2013 9:05 PM
Scientists sequenced the genome of a 80,000 year old skeleton girl found in a Siberian cave. Using a new method that produced very clear results, the researchers were able to find out that the girl had brown hair, skin, and eyes. Because of the quality of the genome, they were able to compare the girl's genetic makeup to that of a modern human. The girl belonged to the ancient Denisovian people, who have the scarcest fossil record but the most known genetic material. The Denisovians split from modern humans 170,000 to 70,00 years ago. A strange finding by the team elsewhere was that East Asians had the most Neanderthal DNA, but Europe has the most Neanderthal fossils. Using their findings, the researchers discovered that the Denisovians bred with the ancestors of some human populations. About three percent of the genomes of New Guineans is Denisovian, and the Han and Dai people of China have trace Denisovian DNA.
PatrickHance's comment, September 22, 2013 9:16 PM
This article is important because it demonstrates a new method in studying DNA. The team that developed the method began prior to May 2010 and already they have made many important findings. The discovery of the Denisovians lineage was one of their first discoveries, and one of the most important. Despite there being only 3 fossils of Denisovians, we already have the most genetic material from them. The samples taken from the girl's finger was of equivalent quality to one taken from a modern human. All of this was done through the team's new method. Imagine what else we could discover.
PatrickHance's comment, September 22, 2013 9:16 PM
Gibbons, Ann. "Genome Brings Ancient Girl to Life." Science Magazine. 8 30 2012: n. page. Web. 22 Sep. 2013. <http://news.sciencemag.org/paleontology/2012/08/genome-brings-ancient-girl-life?ref=hp>.