Questioning Strategies
123 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Connor Reilly
Scoop.it!

Checklist_for_planning_questions.pdf

Connor Reilly's insight:

This checklist is a great way to go over what questions you are going to ask in a lesson as you plan it. I have already printed it out to bring into school! In my class, my students use specific math questioning talk when we ask questions and discuss math. They will 'agree, disagree, or add on' to their peers' thoughts. However, I feel that I have not been asking questions that are quite as effective in sparking conversation as I would like. Within this checklist, I have been asking questions that align with the first and second category. The third category of this checklist is a great supply of higher level thinking questions. This category, "Looking for overall patterns and relationships", has questions that force students to connect to their own thinking, the thinking of their peers, and the other questions and strategies that have been used throughout the lesson. I think that I would throw my students through a loop by asking some of these questions, just like I did when I asked "what if" questions during my open ended problem lesson. I think that training my students to expect these questions will make them better critical thinkers and therefore better equipped for middle and high school, as well as the real world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Connor Reilly
Scoop.it!

Cold Call 1.mov

Connor Reilly's insight:

I have never heard of the "Cold Call" method of questioning before. Here the teacher systematically chooses students quickly to answer questions. This method of questioning keeps students on their toes and also requires them to be engaged. I think this would be a good way to quickly go through answers in a short amount of time, or when checking homework. I would definitely use this in my classroom, because many times when I ask questions I only get the same four or five students who raise their hand. One concern that I have about this questioning strategy is that it does not leave room for students to ask their own questions. I could combat this by using a cold call to have my questions answered, and then allowing students time to ask me or their peers their own questions afterwards. I may try using this method next semester and see how my students react to it. Teachers have to be reflexive in their teaching!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Connor Reilly
Scoop.it!

math open question discussion 2.avi

3 minutes of open question discussion in a Math class
Connor Reilly's insight:

This lesson is a great example on how to ask students the "How Did You?" kind of questions in a math class. The most important thing to notice is that the teacher is constantly asking her students to repeat the thinking of the students who previously shared their ideas. Not only is this teacher asking students how THEY did their work, but also how their peers did their work as well. This is a great way to build math discussion in the classroom. My math classroom currently looks very similar to this. There is often math discussion and discussion of student ideas. Not only are the teachers asking "How Did You?" questions, but the students are encouraged to use their math language to question the ideas of their peers, as well as defend them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Connor Reilly
Scoop.it!

Questioning - Elementary Math

Questioning - Elementary Math | Questioning Strategies | Scoop.it
Dan's post on math questioning reminded me of the video below and how impressed I was by this teacher's questioning skills. She ran the whole class like this and made it work well. It really was so...
Connor Reilly's insight:

The video on this page was a perfect example to illustrate the higher order questioning strategies that we discussed in class. In the video, the teacher merely acts as a facilitator for questioning. When the students in this video are drawing rectangles instead of trapezoids, the teacher does not give the correct answer, but instead asks the students to explain the logic of their wrong answer. This causes the students to realize they need to reevaluate the question. I have begun using higher order thinking questions in my math lessons, but sometimes it is difficult for me to not lead students to the answer if they do not understand. This video shows me that students have the capability to reevaluate their thinking on their own. I really like the teacher's use of the phrase 'explain your logic'. That will be a phrase I use in my teaching next semester.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Connor Reilly
Scoop.it!

How to Check for Understanding of Questions in Group Work

How to Check for Understanding of Questions in Group Work | Questioning Strategies | Scoop.it
Connor Reilly's insight:

I thought that this was a very interesting discussion on how to make sure your students are doing what they should be doing during group work. As Harry Webb mentions, "One of the problems is social loafing. Lazy kids get away with doing v[ery] little". I experience this in my classroom on occassion. Because the desks in my classroom are set up in tables, we do a lot of group work, but there are often students who choose not to participate and answer the questions I have posed. I have used mini whiteboards to assess the group's understanding, but I never thought of using them for each individual student. I am not sure how beneficial it would be to me in my classroom, but I would be interested to try it out! 

more...
No comment yet.