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Crew training breathing apparatus QFRS

Crew training breathing apparatus QFRS | Quest Two | Scoop.it
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Breathing apparatus training is a crucial part of the training that all auxiliary and permanent fire fighters must undertake. It allows the fire crews to enter dangerous environments and attempt rescue and recovery operations. The oxygen cylinders weigh fifteen kilograms and are worn on the backs of the crew, they can become heavy and the average time a cylinder lasts is approx 20 mins. There are multiple OHS policies in place when a fire fighter is using breathing apparatus to ensure the safety of the crew. At least one fire fighter is assigned to monitor the teams of two that are wearing BA, each team is monitored closely via radio contact. Depending on the environment the crews are in, the risks change dramatically.  They vary from structural fires, bush fires, to chemical spills and gas leaks. Many situations escalate quickly and crews must be prepared to adapt and follow orders precisely. 

 

Captain Glen Hamilton of the Blackwater Fire Station has been a senior fire fighter and trainer for many years, He takes the safety and training of his crew very seriously and ensures that each member is fully qualified and confident in their role. He is a highly respected Captain who has trained many fire fighters throughout his career and is constantly updating his knowledge and skills of OH&S.

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Rugby league

Rugby league | Quest Two | Scoop.it
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Braydon and Jack have both played rugby league since they were five years old.  Both have sustained many injuries over the years and both continue to play senior rugby league since they have left school.  Braydon uses a head guard while playing as he stated that he feels it will reduce the chances of a serious head injury. Jack always wears a mouth guard to protect his teeth and a shoulder guard as he has suffered previous damage to his right shoulder. Braydon has had surgery on his left knee to repair damage caused by playing and will often strap that knee to prevent further injury.

 

Rugby league has a long history of serious injuries to the players, it is a highly popular sport with a huge fan base, especially within Australia and New Zealand. Multiple serious injuries have and still do occur, just recently a young Newcaste Knights player has been left a quadraplegic due to a spear tackle that crushed his spine.  Scientific studies have recently linked concussions to brain injuries, caused by players receiving multiple hard blows to the head during their football careers. Many other life long injuries are sustained from playing this sport such as broken bones, soft tissue damage, ligaments and tendon injuries as well as facial cuts and dental trauma. The national rugby league committee has evolved with the game and many new rules have been implemented to avoid serious injury however, it seems that more needs to be done in order to lesson the number of serious injuries that still occur.

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Outrigging

Outrigging | Quest Two | Scoop.it
Nat Shepherd's insight:

Keppel bay outrigging club consists of a large group of adults who love to paddle out on the ocean. The club has four trainers who are qualified to teach outrigging, and before an individual can partake in a group paddle they must first go out in a canoe with a trainer and be put through an induction that covers safety and rules of paddling.  JJ  (as he is known) has been teaching for many years and explained that it is very rare for injuries or accidents to occur as this is a group activity and everyone works together. 

 

The main risks involved with outrigging is tipping over. The Waka is the main part of the vessel, and the Ama is the long arm that sits parallel to the canoe and stabalises it. When the Waka tips it causes the Ama to come out of the water and smash down when it overturns. To avoid being hit by the Ama the crew are taught to stay inside the Waka until the Ama has come back down. . These risks are minimal as there is a policy to follow if the canoe tips, and a certain way to paddle that avoids capsizing. 

Risk assessments are done before the crew takes to the water, weather updates are always checked as well as the Wakas and paddles. Safety gear is carried on board and consists of life jackets, a spare paddle which is tied to the Ama, a 30 metre tow rope and two bailers. Other risks to outriggers are marine life such as stingers, sharks and sting rays,as well as other marine vessels. 

 

 

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Outrigger Canoe Safety - What Every Paddler Needs to Kno www.ocpaddler.com/node/289

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Nonnie is an 18 year old female who spent most of 2011 participating in the Keppel Bay Outrigger club. She enjoyed her time with the club and was taught all of what she learnt by other club members.  Most of the safety aspects were learnt as she progressed with paddling, however on her first day in the water she was told the majority of safety rules and regulations by the club instructor. 

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risk management of waka ama - Google Search

Nat Shepherd's insight:

Waka Ama is the traditional New Zealand name for outrigging. It has been a popular sport and can be traced back hundreds of years within Maori culture as the early Maoris used the Wakas as sea going vessels to hunt. There are strict safety guidelines that must be followed and all clubs are bound to the same rules. If Nonnie were to travel to New Zealand she could easily access this information on the internet to be sure of any changes that may be different to the rules of her local outrigging club.

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Nine Dangers at the Beach - National Ocean Service - NOA oceanservice.noaa.gov › News › Features

Nat Shepherd's insight:

Being aware of the dangers of the beach and ocean can make a huge difference for people participating in ocean activities.  Marine wildlife such as sharks,jelly fish, marine stingers, sting rays, sea snakes, and harmful algae blooms can be fatal to humans. Other forces of nature such as lightning, tsunamis and tidal rips can also prove fatal. Knowing how to avoid these situations and how to deal with them if the situation were to occur can mean the difference between life and death.  Education is paramount in staying as safe as possible while participating in outrigging.

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Rock climbing

Rock climbing | Quest Two | Scoop.it
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Connor and Callum rock climbing at the Toowoomba show. Both boys enjoyed this experience and felt very safe while they were climbing due to the safety harnesses they were wearing. The harnesses were fitted and checked by the person in charge of the  rock wall and both boys at different times let go of the rock holds and were held stable by the ropes and safety harnesses.

 

Safety regulations differ between states regarding the use of helmets while rock climbing. There are several safety policies that must be followed such as checking of all equipment for damage of weakness. The walls must be checked regularly for nails or any other sharp edges that could cut peoples hands. Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn while climbing, and only qualified persons may be in charge of this activity.

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Installing insulation

Installing insulation | Quest Two | Scoop.it
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Ross spent the day installing pink batts into this shed roof as a favour.  He explained that pink batts are small itchy glass fibres and that certain precautions should be taken while intstalling them.  He used disposable overalls, safety glasses and face mask and gloves when he was handling the batts. He explained that it was important to try and cover all exposed areas of skin, and not to scratch if possible as it would further embed the fibres into exposed areas of skin. He said that breathing in the fibres was highly dangerous and to use the face mask at all times.

 

There are many risks associated with the installation of pink batts and other insulation. In 2009 and 2010 four young men died while working for a government roofing insulation scheme. One death was caused by heat exhaustion, the other three caused by electrocution because they were using mental staples while power was still on. Aside from these dangers are also the risks of falling, eye injuries, allergic reactions to skin and respiratory systems and fatigue and dehydration from working in intense heat. Using ladders and other apparatus to access the ceilings can also be dangerous if OHS rules are not followed.

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How to Avoid Sunstroke: 5 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHo www.wikihow.com › ... › Injury and Accidents › Heat and Cold Injuries

How to Avoid Sunstroke: 5 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHowwww.wikihow.com › ... › Injury and Accidents › Heat and Cold Injuries‎  

Nat Shepherd's insight:

Spending hours in the sun has many associated risks. Sun burn, dehydration, sun stroke, heat stroke, and being sun safe is of the utmost importance. Being on the water paddling is especially risky and the glare and reflection off the water can make sun burn worse. Most paddlers wear cotton long sleeved shirts or special sun shirts to protect from sunburn. Hats, sunglasses and sunscreen are also used as well as carrying water bottles on the canoe and drinking lots of water before heading out on the ocean. Being aware of the damage the sun can cause, and taking the necessary precautions will help to prevent Nonnie from suffering sun associated dangers.

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Rips: Australia's biggest ocean killer - ABC News (Australian .. www.abc.net.au/news/2010-12-21/rips-australias...ocean.../2381582

Rips: Australia's biggest ocean killer - ABC News (Australian ...www.abc.net.au/news/2010-12-21/rips-australias...ocean.../2381582‎  ;

Nat Shepherd's insight:

Ocean rips, a silent and unseen killer, responsible for more deaths than any other ocean danger.  Surf life savers report that the greatest incidence they deal with is saving swimmers who become caught in rips. Being able to identify a rip and knowing how to escape from one is the most important information that a swimmer can have.  Outrigging participants are nearly always in the waka (or outrigger) however, occasionally they will jump out and swim into shore when the waka is close to the beach. Also having the knowledge of how to identify a rip can be important in warning other beach goers of the danger. 

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