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Managing_Noise_and_Preventing_Hearing_Loss_at_Work.pdf

Dennis.Finlayson's insight:

Exposure to excessive noise within in the workplace even at the lower ranges can cause long term hearing loss. Hearing loss is irreversible and as a result causes long term health implications. It is caused by the hair cells in the inner ear becoming damaged as a result of over exposure. People who experience hearing loss often experience difficulty in holding a conversation with background noise present. Another problem is tinnitus which is often described as an incessant ringing that can cause a myriad of negative health outcomes. 

This code of practice is very effective tool to help deal with the risk created by exposure to excessive levels of noise in the workplace. The level of detail this COP provides Paul with a important reference to deal with most facets to deal with this particular risk. Cutting bricks would be a main source of exposure to excessive noise levels. Potential fixes would include replacing saw for a quieter one, providing a sound barrier or screen, and ensuring workers used appropriate PPE, such as ear protection. 

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Roof Tile Cutting Silica Dust Exposure

Roof Tile Cutting Silica Dust Exposure | Quest 3 and Beyond | Scoop.it
Roof Tile Cutting Silica Dust Exposure - This guidance provides information on eliminating minimizing exposure to silica dust from the on-site cutting of roof tiles.
Dennis.Finlayson's insight:

Whilst this article is aimed at roof tile cutting this is highly relevant for bricklayers. Paul made specific mention that dust is a particular problem on his sites.This is a very serious hazard especially when bricks are being cut and release silica dust. The danger presented by  silica it's a very small and sharp compound. Once entering the lungs it has the capacity to reach the alveoli and cause significant abrasions. Over time this can result in loss of lung function, continual exposure makes the risk of serious damage even higher. This guidance material contains links to standards and other related guidance material similarly related to this article. Bricklaying requires bricks to be cut and this is something that can't be eliminated. The next step would be engineering where the dust is suppressed with water, either attached to the saw itself, or in another form. The use of PPE would further enhance the protection. This guide suggests a P1 dust mask Should be used at all times when cutting is in progress. Furthermore the guide suggests that the worksite and equipment is regularly vacuumed to ensure residual dust is safely removed.

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slips_trips_falls_guide2007.pdf

Dennis.Finlayson's insight:

Accidents in the workplace caused by slips, trips, falls, are very common across all industries. This is a very serious problem is Queensland alone 13,000 workers sustained an injury from experiencing a slip, trip, or fall. The construction industry is no different. The ever-changing physical environment bricklayers work in creates a series of potential slip, trip, and fall hazards.

This guide is a go to resource that can help Paul effectively manage the risks associated with slips, trips, and falls on his worksites. This document details control measures that are used to effectively remove or reduce the risk. Whilst we cannot rely on just common sense, having a guidance material such as this will prove invaluable. 

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Paul, Bricklayer

Paul, Bricklayer | Quest 3 and Beyond | Scoop.it

Paul is a bricklaying business owner operating out of Melbourne. He has been in the industry since leaving school over fourteen years ago.


Via Dennis Finlayson
Dennis.Finlayson's insight:

More to come.....

Search the internet to source risk management and prevention guidance material (from reliable sources) to assist your person of interest. 


include insights about how the material will assist them to manage the OHS issues in their environment 





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Dennis Finlayson's curator insight, April 9, 2014 5:02 AM

 

 

Paul spends a great deal of time at work onsite outdoors. His daily activities consist of: laying bricks, mixing mortar, cutting bricks, heavy lifting, manual labour, working with cement and lime. Paul states that hazards typical to his workplace include but are not limited to: broken bricks and rubble, mud and puddles, dust, loud noise, and chemicals. Paul considers his work environment safe and that safety is a serious matter on his sites, ‘’communication between all workers helps to ensure this’’. In addition to the hazards previously mentioned Paul made specific mention to working at different heights. Having recently overcome a back injury resulting from ‘’bad habits’’, Paul now approaches working at different heights in a way that is less strenuous and reduces the risk of injury. He kneels whenever possible and bends at the hips as opposed to hunching over. Paul adds that poor posture at work is systemic within the industry, and is just a case of ‘’bad working habits’’.

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Model Code of Practice - Managing Risks of Hazardous Chemicals in the Workplace - Safe Work Australia

Model Code of Practice - Managing Risks of Hazardous Chemicals in the Workplace - Safe Work Australia | Quest 3 and Beyond | Scoop.it
This site contains materials supporting the WHS laws including; the model WHS Act, model WHS Regulations and model Codes of Practice. Analysis of data and research relating to work health and safety and workers’ compensation is available from this site.
Dennis.Finlayson's insight:

In Paul's typical workplace chemicals that are regularly used include, lime, hydrochloric acid, and cement.

This Code of Practice is an extensive resource for managing risks of hazardous chemicals in the Workplace. The information includes Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and their application in the workplace.  

In addition to this chemical specific risk guidance is provided. Furthermore to effectively manage risks associated with chemicals the role that routes of entry, and physicochemical properties play needs to be understood. This COP highlights these area's that need to be addressed. 

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Risks in your industry

Dennis.Finlayson's insight:

This is a very engaging tool to help managing the industry specific risks associated with manual handling. This guide has guidance material aimed to improve, cement bag handling, loading bricks and mortar above shoulder height, loading and unloading vehicles, and reducing the need to manually handling concrete blocks. 

 The first link provided in this toolkit is a guidance document for manual handling. This guide provide information such as legal requirements, and steps to minimise the risk of manual handling. Suggestions include, use of lifting aids, using safe lifting technique, training of staff. In Victoria manual handling is responsible for the most workplace accidents than any other cause. As most workers in the industry will testify back injuries as a result of manual handling is a far to common occurrence. As a result this guide is critical for Paul to help manage the risks associated with manual handling.

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manage-whs-risks-cop-2011.pdf

Dennis.Finlayson's insight:

This code of practice is approved under the current WHS legislation. Therefore it is an effective tool to help become and remain compliant through effectively managing risks that are present within the workplace.This COP ascertains, responsibilities, key terms of reference, hazard identification, assessment of risks

The extent in detailing how to undertake a risk assessment will prove very useful. It also provides step by step instruction on how to apply the heirarchy of controls to manage risks.

There is also real case studies used as examples for real world application. 

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