Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3
19 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Caroline Kermode from Barefoot Waterski
Scoop.it!

97-Year-Old Adrenaline Junkie | The Adrenalist

97-Year-Old Adrenaline Junkie | The Adrenalist | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it
As if waterskiing with nothing but a pair of old, barking dogs wasn't impressive enough, Blair also continues to downhill ski and snowboard (not barefoot). He holds the Guinness World Record for oldest barefoot waterskier (I ...

Via Paul Stokes
Caroline Kermode's insight:

Wow, now that's impressive....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

Waterskiing

Waterskiing

Caroline Kermode's insight:

I was surprised with the lack of information on the risk management and prevention guidance.  Waterskiing can be a dangerous sport and the only information I could access on the internet was on the Boat owner/driver and observer requirements and obligations. 

Being a water skier myself, there has been things I have been taught when it comes to the safety of the skier.  Personal floatation device and hand signals which are in my scoop it finds.  What I find amazing is that there is little to no information on some of the things you can do to reduce the risk or prevent an injury.

Stretching before skiing reduces the risk of muscle strain while a wetsuit and wetsuit pants can prevent douche (water in places it's not meant to be). 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

Water skiing and towing

Water skiing and towing | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it
Find out about water skiing, parasailing, and towing inflatables or boards in Western Australia. Here you can find out about your responsibilities, safety, reporting incidents and location of water ski areas.
Caroline Kermode's insight:

Department of Transport WA states the rules and obligations of the boat owner but very little on the risk.  The rules on the water help prevent accidents. 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

Waterskiing (Maritime Safety Queensland)

Waterskiing (Maritime Safety Queensland) | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it
Information about waterskiing safety.
Caroline Kermode's insight:

This has some general safety advice and requirements by law for the boat owners and crew with some safety tips on hand signals for communication between the skier and boat crew. 

Some of the example signals at the bottom are unrealistic and not useful as the skier will not know what speed they are doing.  An up and down signal is more useful in this situation.

This is a helpful site for the boat owner's obligation and the rules surrounding waterskiing.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

Waterskiing / Barefooting

Waterskiing / Barefooting | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it

Wade & DJ are friends that come waterskiing with us.  Glen & I can't barefoot but these two guys are fun to watch. 

As you can see the crashes are spectacular and at times can hurt.

Caroline Kermode's insight:

Wade is showing us what not to do....

Some of the issues with waterskiing and barefooting:

 

Impact Hazard - at the speeds required for barefooting when a fall happens, hitting the water can be quiet hard.

 

Friction Hazard - When barefooting the bottom of your foot is skimming across the top of the water and can cause friction burn.

 

The other issues are more with waterskiing in general:

 

Impact Hazard - Something submerged underwater is always a risk.

 

Water Hazard - If not wearing proper wetsuits or personal floatation device, drowning and water in places it does not belong are high risk.

 

With the water not always flat can cause a fall into the water which if you don't fall the right way can cause broken bones (Glen, my husband has had broken ribs, Twice).

 

The Boat driver and other boats are a hazard, as they can drive over the top of a waterskier. 

 

This is a fun sport, although we are responsible some other boat crews are not and being aware our surroundings and following the rules are important.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

The Mail Room

The Mail Room | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it

Sharon is like me, vertically challenged, we both are only 5 foot high. 

Sharon runs a mail room.  It's not her job entirely but a main part of her duties. 

I am not authorised to state her work place, although she agreed to talk to me about what OHS issues she encounters.

 

Caroline Kermode's insight:

One of the main issues that comes with the mail room position is that the mail comes in a mail bag weighing 16kg.  Lifting and empting the mail onto the sorting table and the sorting table height and the height of the pigeon holes for the mail are other ergonomic hazards that Sharon faces. 

In this case the counter location has its own problem as when the front door is opened anyone standing at the counter could get hit by the open door.  Repetitive movements and lighting could also add to the issues in the mail room. 

Sharon has a really good employer who have done their best to address most of the issues like a foot rest and a special chair for her desk, although some issues are harder to address as they are fixed objects and cant be moved without remodeling the mail room.

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

Waterskiing

Waterskiing

Caroline Kermode's insight:

I was surprised with the lack of information on the risk management and prevention guidance.  Waterskiing can be a dangerous sport and the only information I could access on the internet was on the Boat owner/driver and observer requirements and obligations. 

Being a water skier myself, there has been things I have been taught when it comes to the safety of the skier.  Personal floatation device and hand signals which are in my scoop it finds.  What I find amazing is that there is little to no information on some of the things you can do to reduce the risk or prevent an injury.

Stretching before skiing reduces the risk of muscle strain while a wetsuit and wetsuit pants can prevent douche (water in places it's not meant to be). 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

Australian Waterski and Wakeboard Federation

Australian Waterski and Wakeboard Federation | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it
Caroline Kermode's insight:

AWWF has limited information on the risk involved with waterskiing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

Boating Handbook

Boating Handbook | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it
Caroline Kermode's insight:

NSW Transport Maritime Boating Handbook gives guidance on what the responsibilities are for all concerned involved in waterskiing.

Once again focusing on the Boat driver and crew, with very little information of the risk of waterskiing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

4WD - Four Wheel Driving

4WD - Four Wheel Driving | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it

Well this is what happens when I let my husband (Glen) take our car to go and play in the mud..... The funny story with this is we had only bought the car 2 week before.  Glen's favorite past time is 4WD. 

 

I wanted to put a video of us crossing a flooded creek when we had been stuck on the other side of the creek blocking our only.  (we were safe)

Caroline Kermode's insight:

With the type of 4WD we do Glen & I both agreed that the OHS issues with 4WD are endless,

 

4WD you have a high risk of an accident, like a roll over or losing control crashing into anything at any speed.

The following hazards would apply,

 

Fire or Explosions & Chemical Hazards as fuel, oil and other liquids would spilled.

Entanglement and entrapment, strike or impact, shearing, stabbing and puncture and confined space are also possible. 

Structural hazards like a road give way or a bridge.

Mechanical hazards are if something breaks like steering, hoses or tyres. 

 

Even if there is no accident the issues like ergonomics and mist, dust & vapour hazards are there.

 

I would like to add that I believe that my husband Glen is an OHS issue too......LOL.  He becomes a kid in a candy store when mud is around........

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

Young Endeavour

Young Endeavour | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it

Shane is the Survival (Safety) Equipment Maintainer.

 The Young Endeavour gives the opportunity to our youth aged 16 to 23,  to spend 11 days and Sail train onboard this ship. 

Caroline Kermode's insight:

There is numerous hazards involved in this position.  The 9 crew have the responsibility for the safety of the 24 young men and women who train on the Young Endeavour.  Here are just some of the hazards and issues addressed aboard the Young Endeavour,

Chemical Hazards for cleaning of the ship and fuel running the motors.

Electrical Hazards around the ship as there are electricity running from the motors.

Slip, Trip and Falls as the ship is constantly moving, and can be wet as well as safety lines and ropes all around the deck.

Noise as the running of the motors can be loud and constant when in closed quarters.

Falls from the top of the mast.  The height of the mast is over 33meters high and on a moving ship it is easy to lose your balance.

 

I was surprised the standard and amount of Shane's work is on WHS.

The ships safety team consist of

The Captain

Sail Master (2IC)

Engineer

Safety Equipment Maintainer

Medical Care Provider

Bosun

 

Everything aboard the ship has a Standing Risk Profile (Risk Assessment), every year these are evaluated and updated.

All though these are in place the safety team assess the risk constantly while aboard the ship and each task has a briefing for the guest and crew.  The safety team monitor and assess each other while tasks are underway.

 

After talking to Shane I hope to give my two children the opportunity to spend a trip on the Young Endeavour to gain the skills and benefit from the time aboard.

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caroline Kermode
Scoop.it!

Fire Fighters

Fire Fighters | Quest 2 - The things we do! Quest 3 | Scoop.it

You hear that fire fighters put their lives on the line everyday! 

But do we really understand what that means?

Aeron is a fire fighter in Cairns, working in different roles and locations.

Caroline Kermode's insight:

As fire fighters they attend a variety of situations putting their lives at risk to assist others.  Here is a list of hazards that fire fighters face on a daily basis.

 

Chemical Hazards - Fuels, Oils, unknown chemicals

Physical Hazards - Debris, Rocks, Trees

Mechanical Hazards - Vehicles, Chainsaw

Electrical Hazards - Power Lines, House electricity

Hazards in Structures - Burnt building lost structural integrity 

Environmental Hazards - Falling objects, Tripping, Entrapment

Ergonomic Hazards - Lifting, Heat, Cold, Repetitive work.

Biological Hazards - Blood, bodily fluids, bacteria and viruses

Psychological Hazards - Stress, Fatigue, Exposure, Long hours.

Health Hazards - Fatigue, Sunburn, Dehydration & Heat Related Illness

 

We tend to forget that they do more than just fight fires, here in Cairns they assist the police in all sort of situations. 

The stress of shift work along with the situations they face can add to the OHS issues with the above hazards.

 

In any day they can face callout after callout or not receive any callouts at all, attend a fatality, trapped or injured people in vehicle accidents. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.