Pverty Assignment_Parth Uday
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Poverty and Water in Africa

Poverty and Water in Africa | Pverty Assignment_Parth Uday | Scoop.it
Learn how poverty relief in Africa begins with access to clean water. Discover how water can help end poverty and hunger.

Via waimoe
Parth Uday's insight:

this is my insight using see-think-wonder thinking routine

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Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 8:13 AM

Water is essential for life. Safe, abundant water is vital to our ability to prosper and fulfilled our potential. Without it, we face a continual decline in our well-being. No access to clean water, and almost no access to clean sanitation, causing widespread suffering from malaria, typhoid, dysentery and many other diseases.  These illness not only stop people working, going to school and causing pain but they kill many more young children before the age of 5 than happens in the developed world. They also kill people younger so children are left without parents and people in work die off leaving projects unfinished, and expertise gaps.  Apart from this effect upon our health, the loss of productivity that results from water-related illnesses holds back our progress. Population is growing rapidly each year, but the lack of safe water and sanitation reduces our economic growth at twice that rate. And a growing population must be properly fed. We need to increase our water production by half. How will we achieve this without reducing the amount and quality of the remaining water resources which we will need for drinking and sanitation? Clearly, the provision of sustainable, clean water for our people should be high priority. Sustainable supplies of water, its better management and protection are the key to this success - just as increased agricultural productivity holds the key to spreading prosperity and our other development goals.

Huang Ziqian's comment, January 29, 2014 12:12 PM
Water is the most essential and basic need for anyone or any countries. In Africa, there is an extremely limited sources of water. This makes the lives of people there more and more difficult. Besides, there are already many problems have appeared in Africa, the government has not taken any measures to solve them. In other words, the solutions may not be very efficient. To reduce poverty in Africa, the government as well as the whole society must think of solutions to help. For example, water can be transported from other countries to Africa. Although it will be costing a great amount of money, it is necessary. Charities can be set up, however, to prevent corruption, things for daily use or supplies can be collected instead of money.
Cappy's curator insight, March 7, 2014 12:24 PM

Poverty may be a result of many man made causes, but one of the greatest causes of poverty is also the most overlooked, which is the lack of access to clean water. Lack of water is often an obstacle in helping oneself. You can’t grow food, built house, stay healthy, and children would have no time for school. People spend couple hours a day to find and transport any water they can find whether it’s clean or not. Their containers can weigh up to a lot, and they need to carry it almost more than three hours everyday. It is estimated that the Sub-Saharan Africa loses about 40 billion hours per year collecting water. These people don’t have enough time to do anything else because they lose about 3 hours each day collecting water. The Water Project is trying to help by providing clean water, using money from donations they will create wells.


I realised that children in dry regions of Africa are using most of their time to find and transport water. This left them with less time for their education and other activities. Poverty is also the result of people lacking time to develop their wealth. When clean water is provided, people’s health improved, and hunger will be reduced because water is provided for the crops. The article tells me that it is possible to break Africa’s poverty cycle by providing access to clean water.


I realised how much Africa’s climate can affect people’s way of life, and how much it changed their life. I do agree that we should provide the people access to clean water to reduce their time on getting water and to let them use their time on something else. Most of the water people found were dirty and uncleaned, which result in infected residents from waterborne diseases. I think that providing clean water to these people is the best way to cure poverty.


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allAfrica.com: Africa: Investing in Agriculture Most Effective Way to Eradicate Poverty in Africa - UN Official

allAfrica.com: Africa: Investing in Agriculture Most Effective Way to Eradicate Poverty in Africa - UN Official | Pverty Assignment_Parth Uday | Scoop.it

With the deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) just three years away, a senior United Nations official today emphasized that spending on agriculture is the most effective type of investment for halting poverty in Africa.

"Increasing investment in agriculture is essential to achieving the MDGs," said the President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), Kanayo F. Nwanze. "Investments in agriculture are more effective in lifting people out of poverty than investments in any other sector - they not only drive economic growth and set the stage for long-term sustainable development, they pay high dividends in terms of quality of life and dignity for poor rural people."

Mr. Nwanze's comments came on the eve of his departure to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, where he will join African ministers at high-level meetings to plan concrete actions to push growth in the continent, by ensuring that agriculture is at the top of national agendas.


Via W. Robert de Jongh
Parth Uday's insight:

This is my insight using see-think-wonder thinking routines. 

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Parth Uday's curator insight, January 31, 2013 8:14 PM

This is my insight using see-think-wonder thinking routine.