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A Global Approach to Assess Food and Nutrition Security – Baseline Results from 10 Countries SHORT - YouTube

Communications agency supporting global development efforts in the area of agriculture and rural development
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Ethiopia battles wheat rust disease outbreak in critical wheat-growing regions

Ethiopia battles wheat rust disease outbreak in critical wheat-growing regions | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
Ethiopia battles wheat rust disease in critical wheat-growing regions An outbreak of wheat rust disease is threatening recent crop production gains in parts of the country, following a long period of El-Niño-induced drought. About 10 million Ethiopians are food-insecure.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Augmentation des rendements dans les rizières africaines

Augmentation des rendements dans les rizières africaines | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
C'est une excellente nouvelle pour l'agriculture africaine : selon l'institut AfricaRice de Cotonou au Bénin, les rendements dans les rizières africaines ont augmenté de 30 % depuis la dernière grande crise alimentaire de 2008.
Via JJ Grodent
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Russia: Siberian scientists breed flexible wheat hydrid

Russia: Siberian scientists breed flexible wheat hydrid | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it

Biologists from Tyumen State University (TyumSU) have created hybrids of spring soft wheat possessing extremely high ecological flexibility, e.g. the ability to adapt to different conditions, the TyumSU press service said.


Via CIMMYT, Int.
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The Future of Virtual Reality: Joel Comm Show w/@Ryan_A_Bell

Watch Joel Comm (@joelcomm) talk about The Future of Virtual Reality: Joel Comm Show w/@Ryan_A_Bell live on Blab
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Is Egyptian government pushing farmers to stop growing wheat?

Is Egyptian government pushing farmers to stop growing wheat? | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
Complicated bureaucracy and shifting subsidizing policies are pushing many Egyptian farmers to give up cultivation of one of the country's most important crops.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from CGIAR Climate in the News
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Climate agreement can't be met without emissions reduction target for agriculture, says new study | Bloomberg

In a new research published in Global Change Biology, CCAFS and partners calculated, for the first time, the extent to which agricultural emissions must reduce to meet the new climate agreement to limit warming to 2C in 2100.


Via CGIAR Climate
Pascal Corbé's insight:
It is more about the HOW and the TO WHICH EXTENT that is important and reflected in this piece here -- though nothing new in a way!  But nothing new is also that the climate debate, embedded in an UN process, remains to be a case in point for silo thinking -- or, let's be frank, demarcations of interest spheres, where 'climate professionals' often want to make sure no-other professions eat up parts of their donor pie.
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Agriculture cutbacks needed to meet climate targets | Newshub

According to a new study by CCAFS and partners, annual emissions reductions from agriculture must reach 1 GtCO2e per year by 2030 to stay within 2°C warming limit.


Via CGIAR Climate
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Africa spends $15bn on wheat imports

Africa spends $15bn on wheat imports | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it

Africa spends $15 billion every year to import wheat as its countries cannot produce enough to meet domestic requirements, experts attending the on-going four day Support to Agricultural Research for Development of Strategic Crops (SARD-CS) wheat annual review and planning meeting have said.


Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from OECD DAC in the news
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Savage budget cuts pull Australia down in foreign aid rankings

Savage budget cuts pull Australia down in foreign aid rankings | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
On every measure of generosity there is, Australia's foreign aid ranking is falling behind that of other advanced countries.

Via OECDdev
Pascal Corbé's insight:
"The 2016-17 budget imposed a further cut of A$224 million. When the global donor rankings are updated next year, this additional cut, combined with the second half of the A$1 billion 2015-16 cut, is likely to drag Australia down even further.
"The 2016-17 budget imposed a further cut of A$224 million. When the global donor rankings are updated next year, this additional cut, combined with the second half of the A$1 billion 2015-16 cut, is likely to drag Australia down even further."
 
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The 2016 edition of World Development Indicators is out: three features you won’t want to miss

The 2016 edition of World Development Indicators is out: three features you won’t want to miss | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
We’re excited to announce the release of the 2016 edition of World Development Indicators (WDI). With over 1 million downloads last year, WDI is the most widely used dataset in our Open Data Catalog and it provides high-quality cross-country comparable statistics about development and people’s lives around the globe.
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Reforming donors in fragile states: using public management theory more strategically

Reforming donors in fragile states: using public management theory more strategically | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it

This paper identifies ways in which donors can be more effective in fragile and conflict-affected states by exploiting theories and concepts drawn from public management.

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Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from OECD DAC in the news
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UK Aid Much Needed

UK Aid Much Needed | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
Last year the British parliament passed a law that binds Britain to give away 0.7 per cent of national income in development assistance abroad. Britain is one of the few OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries that have met the United Nations ODA (Official Development Assistance) target for OECD countries.

Via OECDdev
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Nutrition Baseline Surveys in 10 Countries – Presentation of Results (full version)

Summary by Gina Kennedy including Q&A session at the event „A Global Approach to Assess Food and Nutrition Security" on 16 September in Bonn. Slide
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Myth busted on Chinese farmland ownership

Myth busted on Chinese farmland ownership | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
The volume of Australian agricultural property owned by the Chinese is minuscule compared to the area purchased by United Kingdom investors, however the nation’s overall level of foreign agricultural investment is expanding.

Via Angela Brady
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Social Protection and Agriculture for Food Security: Breaking the Cycle of Poverty

Social Protection and Agriculture for Food Security:  Breaking the Cycle of Poverty | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
Pascal Corbé's insight:
Mainly using samples from sub-Saharan Africa, Benjamin Davis provides the evidence that social protection schemes contribute to food security. The Deputy-Director Agricultural Development Economics at FAO illustrates the impacts of social protection on livelihoods, incl. long-term effects on improved human capital as well as on nutritional and health status.
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Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from Erik Solheim - blogs and articles
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Thoughts at the end of my OECD journey

Thoughts at the end of my OECD journey | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
My final day with the OECD has come. After three and a half years with interesting, wise, clever and fun colleagues here in Paris, I am moving to Nairobi to take up my new position as head of the UN Environment. 



Via Erik Solheim
Pascal Corbé's insight:
Solheim leaves to UNEP.
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Erik Solheim's curator insight, June 29, 2:07 AM
I have learned a lot from all of you. Your motivation, hard work and willingness to find good solutions have inspired me. I am proud to have been a part of this highly competent and important organisation, and there is no doubt that I will take with me a lot of knowledge and focus as I move to the UN. 

OECD is at the forefront of showing the world how good politics and practical solutions are far more important factors for development and making successful changes than money. And the OECD's statistics and collection of data in numerous areas are used by policy makers all over the world. By comparing oneself with others or even with oneself over time, one will find inspiration for good policies that work. What works in one country might very well also work in another country. And by comparing oneself with a neighbouring country or a country with fewer resources – but still doing better – one can learn and adopt successful solutions. I am inspired to look into how the UN can approach different solutions for the environment in the same way. 

 In recent years, the OECD has gone through massive changes and reforms. This has been both important and necessary in order to maintain its key role within the international community. Fifteen years ago, the OECD was seen as a quite conservative and perhaps boring organisation, focusing on its traditional group of members. Its views on economics and politics didn't match the progress and development one saw in non-member countries. They simply did not mirror the big, vibrating and interesting world out there. Now this has changed, thanks in no small part to the leadership shown by Secretary-General Gurría, and OECD's work on taxes, investment, environment, education, equality and gender is highly valued. The way OECD also has worked with the G20 group of big economies and welcomed, for instance, Prime Minister Li of China has taken the organisation into the very heart of critical international issues. 

Within the OECD Development Assistance Committee we have also gone through substantial reforms over the past few years. The rules for counting and measuring aid have been changed in key areas like the private sector, loans and peace and security. We have launched new measuring concepts. Many new nations have joined as members or partners of the Committee. We have worked on assisting war-torn states, culminating in the Mali conference. And probably most important of all, we have made huge steps forward in focusing on business and taxes as important drivers of development, complemented and leveraged by aid. 

The reforms of both the wider OECD and the Development Assistance Committee need to continue. To put it bluntly - organisations that don't constantly change, in a rapidly changing world will become irrelevant and in the end will die. We now see China, Arab countries and other emerging economies taking new approaches towards development assistance. We also see recipients of aid legitimately demanding a seat at the table when decisions affecting them are made. It is important for the DAC to continue to reform and challenge the rules of development assistance in order to meet this new world. That is why I have worked over time with the Committee to establish a high-level panel with many of the very best experts in the world to set out a new path for us. The former president of Ireland, Mary Robinson, will chair the panel. 

To continue in its role as the number-one organisation for advice, rules and data, I believe the OECD has to continue to reform, develop and systematically change. It will be important to include even more countries from both Latin America and Asia. One should perhaps not be so concerned about being likeminded, but rather focus on togetherness. To mention some potential countries: Peru, Argentina and Brazil should all be able to follow the path of Colombia and Costa Rica and become members. The same goes for Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia and a number of other Asian countries. I believe the OECD also should expand its work in partnership with African countries to form effective and sound political strategies for development. Deputy Secretary-General Doug Frantz is working on an Africa strategy for the OECD, which I find inspiring. The knowledge of OECD also should be better shared with low-income countries in areas such as taxes, illicit financial flows, education, environment and investment. 

All this being said, I hope we will stay in touch. I will take with me everything I have learned from the OECD, and my door is always open. I know that God created me with two ears and just one mouth for a reason: I should highly appreciate good ideas and input from everyone. So please do not hesitate to contact me!
Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from ICT in Development
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8 maps that will change the way you look at Africa

8 maps that will change the way you look at Africa | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
This incredible collection of maps really puts the African continent's population, income, growth, and potential into context.

Via Tony Roberts
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Tony Roberts's curator insight, July 8, 2014 10:55 AM

Shame that the internet stats are a bit out of date and don't reflect cellular access but I love maps!

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Closing the gap between men and women in agriculture

http://www.fao.org/sofa/gender "The world cannot eliminate hunger without closing the gap between men and women in agriculture. With equal access to productive resources and services, such as land, water and credit, women farmers can produce 20 to 30 percent more food, enough to lift 150 million people out of hunger."


Via Seth Dixon
Pascal Corbé's insight:
While closing the gender gap is both righteous as economically advantageous, I find the claim that the world could not be fed without it totally unfounded and not true. Even the worst dictator could just redistribute the produce currently wasted and the issue would be solved with gender issues left touched. The intention of this message is great but I think from a communications point of view these kinds of exaggerated messages undermine the basis of campaigns and ultimately wear off the attention of your target groups.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 10, 9:28 AM

Gender inequality, especially in rural, less developed part of the world, would lead to some of the fastest developmental improvements for the lives of women, men, children, and families.  Women are the backbone of the rural economy, and this single change would lead to countless benefits.   

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, developmentgender, agriculture, labor.

Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 11, 1:35 AM
A great resource to show geography students! 
Linda White's curator insight, May 13, 10:40 PM
A reason why we need to review all the women that are incarcerated in our society.  The society is loosing so much.
Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from African Agriculture Food and Nutrition Security
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Global water shortages to deliver 'severe hit' to economies, World Bank warns

Global water shortages to deliver 'severe hit' to economies, World Bank warns | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
The Middle East, north Africa, central Asia and south Asia due to suffer biggest economic hit from water scarcity as climate change takes hold, report finds
Via FANRPAN
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Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from CGIAR Climate in the News
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Will we run out of coffee by the end of the century? Intensive farming means two-thirds of land used for beans will be wiped out by 2100 - and bananas and sweetcorn are also at risk | Daily Mail

Maize, beans and bananas are most under threat that climate change poses according to a new study led by CIAT.


Via CGIAR Climate
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Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from Agriculture, Youth and ICTs
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Young African entrepreneurs are surprisingly optimistic about future, though they still have mountains to climb

Young African entrepreneurs are surprisingly optimistic about future, though they still have mountains to climb | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
Young African entrepreneurs are surprisingly optimistic about future, though they still have mountains to climb

Via Nawsheen Hosenally
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Africa’s farming potential hinges on infrastructure boost

Africa’s farming potential hinges on infrastructure boost | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
Africa’s huge agricultural potential holds the promise of covering much of the planet’s nutrition needs. But the continent is hampered by lack of infrastructure and intricate local politics.
Via Nawsheen Hosenally
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Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from OECD DAC in the news
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Development aid is growing, but we still can't track how most is spent - Humanosphere

Development aid is growing, but we still can't track how most is spent - Humanosphere | Purpose-oriented communications 4dev | Scoop.it
The amount of money spent by wealthy countries reached an all-time high in 2015. But an aid transparency group says most of these countries are not living

Via OECDdev
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Rescooped by Pascal Corbé from CGIAR Climate in the News
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As drought deepens, African nations struggle to get globe's attention | The Christian Science Monitor

Countries and regions need to invest in better early warning systems, sturdier insurance for farmers, and more drought resistant crop varieties, according to Bruce Campbell, Director of CCAFS.


Via CGIAR Climate
Pascal Corbé's insight:
"To a large extent, the international community already knows what it needs to do to reduce the level of devastation to African agriculture in future extreme weather events," the head of the CGIAR'S climate programme @cgiarclimate Bruce Campbell says.
"To a large extent, the international community already knows what it needs to do to reduce the level of devastation to African agriculture in future extreme weather events," the head of the CGIAR'S climate programme @cgiarclimate Bruce Campbell says.
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