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A new crop of innovative bean-based foods is coming to your grocery store

A new crop of innovative bean-based foods is coming to your grocery store | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
The nutritional staple is being used to make crackers, pasta, flours and more.
Alan Marson's insight:

There is good reason to be pro-pulse. They are a powerfully nutritious food, packed with protein, essential minerals, fiber and antioxidants. They are sustainable to grow, requiring considerably less water than other protein sources and little or no fertilizer. They store easily — dried beans will retain their optimal quality in a cool, dry place in an airtight container for at least a year, and canned at least two years. On top of that, they are globally appealing — just about every culture in the world uses beans in its cuisine. One downside is that most dried beans need hours of soaking before they are cooked, which requires forethought with meal planning, but there are many, such as lentils, that don’t need to be soaked at all and can be ready in less than 30 minutes. And, of course, canned beans allow you to have cooked beans effortlessly on demand.

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#LovePulses: 10 Ways to Celebrate the International Year of Pulses

#LovePulses: 10 Ways to Celebrate the International Year of Pulses | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
2016 is the U.N. International Year of Pulses, which will celebrate the sustainability of grain legumes.
Alan Marson's insight:

Insight from the full article in Food Tank 

In celebration of the global launch of IYP, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) created a short video highlighting unique opportunities for pulses to contribute to the future of food security. Pulses offer many opportunities for reducing the environmental footprint of food production, especially by fixing nitrogen to improve soil quality.

Just 43 gallons of water can produce one pound of pulses, compared with 216 gallons for soybeans and 368 gallons for peanuts. And production of pulses emits only 5 percent of the greenhouse gas emissions associated with beef production.

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DuPont: Soy will continue to dominate the plant protein market

DuPont: Soy will continue to dominate the plant protein market | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
Despite emerging plant protein sources such as pea and rice, DuPont Nutrition & Health is focused on the soy market.
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From the report in Food Dive :That means manufacturers that replace dairy with soy will typically see significant long-term cost savings and have a greater ability to hedge against dairy protein supply and price volatility.

From a sensory standpoint, DuPont has observed that soy and dairy blends often score better than all-soy or all-dairy in overall liking. The company has also profiled over 60 high-protein commercially available beverages,

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Beyond Meat c.e.o. on ‘the future of protein’

Beyond Meat c.e.o. on ‘the future of protein’ | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
News, Markets and Analysis for the Food Processing Industry
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From The review in Food Business News ;We started with chicken because that’s where the platform first lent itself, and then to a ground beef as a frozen product.

What was interesting about the ground beef was we wanted to introduce pea protein, which at the time was a new protein to consumers. So, we really focused on making a product out of 100% pea protein. That product, which is a ground beef crumble, has done really well for us. 

From there, we made a burger that doesn’t try to emulate a beef burger or a chicken burger or a salmon burger, but combines the best attributes of each from a nutritional perspective into a single product. So, our Beast Burger has omegas, antioxidants, a lot of calcium, a bit of iron and 22 grams of protein.

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Plant-based meat that matches steak for texture: 'The technology is unique in the world'

Plant-based meat that matches steak for texture: 'The technology is unique in the world' | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
Using a unique manufacturing process, Dutch food technologists have developed a plant-based protein that can match the texture of steak and is the most sustainable of all meat alternatives, they say.
Alan Marson's insight:

Insight from the original article :- Aside from  the fibrous texture that resembles steak more than other alternatives, Van der Goot says a major advantage is that the material offers great flexibility in terms of both scalability – a local butcher could install a small machine in his or her shop to produce the material on site or it could be mass-produced in a factory -  as well as shape.

While other meat replacements are often limited to small mince-meat size pieces, the Wageningen technologists can produce pieces with a thickness of 3cm, meaning it could easily resemble a steak or chicken breast.

The manufacturing process is also much more energy efficient than other traditional methods of forming textured vegetable protein, such as extrusion - doubling their claim to sustainability. "We use a mildly refined plant ingredient and a mild [manufacturing] process."

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Health Benefits of pulses and legumes Pulse Canada

How can eating pulses help out your health? Take a look at our new animation, and find out all the nutritional benefits of beans, chickpeas and lentils.
Alan Marson's insight:

Good source of complex carbs and protein -  consumer should regard peas and beans as part of the protein element of dietary intake - Highly sustainable crop - look out for Year of the Pulse 2016 http://iyp2016.org/

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Discovery of beans that can beat the heat could global warming protecting the food staple of many developing countries

Discovery of beans that can beat the heat could global warming protecting the food staple of many developing countries | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it

Just in case you missed this the first time around :-As a result of a major breakthrough, beans are now set to withstand extreme temperatures, protecting a staple food of the poor in developing countries.

Alan Marson's insight:

Insight  from the item first published in March 2015 :-Some of the heat-tolerant beans identified by Beebe and his team have also been deliberately bred through conventional methods to be higher in iron in an effort to tackle malnutrition. In developing countries, deficiencies of this essential micronutrient afflict one out of every two preschool children and pregnant women, making them highly susceptible to anemia and compromising children’s growth and cognitive development. While beans are already high in iron, these new varieties could eventually provide up to 60 percent of daily iron needs for women and children—almost twice the iron of non-improved beans.

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Parents Losing the Breakfast Battle

Parents Losing the Breakfast Battle | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
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Insight : The research, commissioned by the Australian Breakfast Cereal Manufacturers Forum (ABCMF), conducted on a nationally representative sample of Australian parents of primary school aged children (5-12 years), highlighted the challenge many families face when it comes to breakfast.

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Plant-based diet may reduce obese children's risk of heart disease

Plant-based diet may reduce obese children's risk of heart disease | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
Obese children who begin a low-fat, plant-based vegan diet may lower their risk of heart disease through improvements in their weight, blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol levels, insulin sensitivity, and high-sensitivity C-reactive, according to new research.
Alan Marson's insight:

From the Science Daily review "Most families in the study were able to follow these dietary guidelines for the four-week study," Dr. Macknin said, "but we found that they had difficulty purchasing the food necessary for a balanced plant-based diet. So we know that plant-based diets are effective, but if they are to be widely used, we need to make access to plant-based, no-added-fat foods easier and more affordable."

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Salt reduction – repeat exposure to low sodium alternatives can build consumer preference even during a high sodium diet

Salt reduction – repeat exposure to low sodium alternatives can build consumer preference even during a high sodium diet | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
A recent study published in Food Quality and Preference and led by Nuala Bobowski from the University of Minnesota investigated whether liking for reduced sodium and low sodium tomato juice would increase following repeated exposure. The results demonstrated that it is possible that not all products in the diet need to change at the same speed in order for consumers to accept lower sodium products following repeated exposure over an extended period. Eighty three subjects undertook an initial taste test, a 16-week longitudinal study, and a final taste test.
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A student technology projects turns brewing waste into algal omega-3 oils

A student technology projects turns brewing waste into algal omega-3 oils | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
An encouraging link to NFI's venture, Junior Consulting, and a definite groundbreaking study of how younger people have a stake in food industry innovation in this article from Jo Sweetman that demonstrates the power of tapping into student innovators.  In this study, Waste CO2 from brewery fermenters could be used to add nutrients to help photosynthetic algae grow in a photobioreactor which is large enough to provide reasonable economies of scale but small enough to fit on a brewery’s roof.
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Legumes: Good or Bad?

Legumes: Good or Bad? | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
This is a detailed article about legumes and their health effects. Legumes are high in protein and fiber, but also contain anti-nutrients.
Alan Marson's insight:

Increased frequency of consumer use as a portion of protein intake along with overall global consumption of Legumes seem to be an essential part of future diets if we are to win the fight against food insecurity 

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Snack wars: Would you eat a chip made from beans? - CNBC

Snack wars: Would you eat a chip made from beans? - CNBC | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
“Salty snacks are a $16 billion business, but Americans are increasingly looking for something healthier. Like beans.”
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Rich in protein - Beanitos snacks made from beans
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Our gigantic problem with portions: why are we all eating too much?

Our gigantic problem with portions: why are we all eating too much? | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
We are consuming ever bigger portions on ever larger dinner plates. Food manufacturers keep pushing us to eat more. Can we learn to control our helpings?
Alan Marson's insight:

If you want to see how inflated our portion sizes have become, don’t go to the supermarket – head to an antique shop. You spot a tiny goblet clearly designed for a doll, only to be told it is a “wine glass”. What look like side plates turn out to be dinner plates. The real side plates resemble saucers.

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Pulses, purple and portable protein - key baked goods trends for the year ahead

Pulses, purple and portable protein - key baked goods trends for the year ahead | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
Branding and innovation expert Claire Nuttall – who has worked with many global food and drink businesses – reveals her pick of the trends set to shape the global baked goods market in the coming 12 months.
Alan Marson's insight:

Good Way to start 2016 after all its the International Year of the Pulse -  This link provides lots of information on the application of pulses and legumes http://iyp2016.org/

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First ever vegan school in the US says you can't consume animals and care for the environment

First ever vegan school in the US says you can't consume animals and care for the environment | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
40 per cent of parents pulled their kids out of the school when it first happened.
Alan Marson's insight:

A staggering 51 per cent or more of global greenhouse-gas emissions are caused by animal agriculture, according to a report published by the Worldwatch Institute.

Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2015/11/12/director-james-camerons-wife-opened-first-all-vegan-school-as-he-filmed-avatar-5496654/#ixzz3ra04pbXt

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scoopit Hear the Way Your Food Tastes.docx

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Is hearing your food a way of determining the quality?

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Pulses take off | Food Business News

Pulses take off | Food Business News | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
News, Markets and Analysis for the Food Processing Industry
Alan Marson's insight:

Pulses are generally low on the glycemic index, naturally gluten-free, an excellent source of protein, and are a low- to fat-free alternative to animal proteins. And, as it turns out, product developers aren’t the only ones touting the category of nutrient-dense superfoods. The General Assembly of the United Nations has declared that 2016 will be the “International Year of Pulses,” in recognition of the role pulses may play in sustainable agriculture, food security and healthy eating on a global scale. 

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Beef vs. Bean Meals: Both Provide Similar Feeling of Fullness - IFT.org

According to a review published recently by the IFT "Today vegetarians aren’t the only group of consumers looking for foods that are meat-free and provide a satisfying meal. All types of consumers are looking to manage and maintain weight with plant-based meal options with ingredients such as protein isolates, whole legumes, whole grains and vegetables. A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), found that a bean-based meal provided a similar feeling of fullness compared to a beef-based meal"

Alan Marson's insight:

Full details of this review can be found on http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1750-3841.12991/full

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9 products packed with plant protein

9 products packed with plant protein | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
Fit more clean protein into your diet! All of these products contain 5 or more grams of protein from peas, lentils, brown rice and other plant-based sources.
Alan Marson's insight:

Increasing the use of plant proteins to replace a portion of animal based protein in your diet improves health , reduces climate change and improves food secturity 

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Mediterranean Diet of Low Meat, High Fiber Lowers Risk of Stroke - Tech Times

Mediterranean Diet of Low Meat, High Fiber Lowers Risk of Stroke - Tech Times | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
The Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of ischemic stroke by up to 18 percent, reveals a new study. The diet includes an array of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts.
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Junior Consultants | Lifting off to a better future in food innovation

Junior Consultants | Lifting off to a better future in food innovation | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
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Pea dextrin could be a clean label option for masking ‘off flavours’ generated by lipid oxidation

Pea dextrin could be a clean label option for masking ‘off flavours’ generated by lipid oxidation | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
Lipids, in particular polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as omega 3, are particularly prone to degradation due to their multiple cis-double bonds. Research published in Food Chemistry, and led by Sandra Bottcher from Beuth University of Applied Sciences Berlin, investigated the off-flavour masking potential of pea dextrin on six secondary lipid oxidation products.
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Addressing the Demand for Protein Enhancement and Vegetable Sourced Ingredients

Plentiful and sustainably sourced, pulse ingredients can replace allergens, boost the nutritional profile, save on cost and support popular claims such as non-GMO, gluten-free, high-protein, high fiber and low fat. This webinar will focus on formulating high quality products utilizing ingredients derived from pulses.
Alan Marson's insight:

Although we are just entering 2015 , in another 12 months we kick off  The Year of the Pulse  The Webinar supported by Alliance Grain Trading and Ingredion should be of interest company,s and individuals interested in the Food Security and Sustainable nutrition arena 

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Why You Should Switch to Dried Beans - Huffington Post

Why You Should Switch to Dried Beans - Huffington Post | Pulses and legume news | Scoop.it
“We're here to tell you to put aside the can opener and start cooking more with dried beans....”
Alan Marson's insight:
The Huff on beans !
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