Pulled sugar
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About Tempering - What is Tempering - How To Temper Chocolate

About Tempering - What is Tempering - How To Temper Chocolate | Pulled sugar | Scoop.it
What is tempering? We'll explain and help you understand how to temper chocolate and the alternative to tempering.
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robert McGowan's comment, April 3, 2014 6:18 PM
Dampness and condensation result in you being able to see grains of sugar on the surface of the chocolate, or also known as "sugar bloom." Excessive heat or cold result in seeing a whitish or gray color on the chocolate or known as "fat bloom." Blooming is probably the biggest problem with people that work with chocolate. if you haven't melted the chocolate and it has bloomed already, the taste will not be affected because when the chocolate is melted, the cocoa butter will redistribute throughout the chocolate. Fat bloom is just the cocoa butter separating from the cocoa solids and coming to the surface. Proper temperature and storage can prevent blooming.
robert McGowan's comment, April 3, 2014 6:56 PM
You should store chocolate between 55-70°F, ideally with less than 50% humidity, before and after you melt it. Do not refrigerate before or after melting the chocolate. Absolutely do not freeze also. remember that blooming is caused by dampness and condensation, and excessive heat or cold.
robert McGowan's comment, April 3, 2014 6:56 PM
Chocolate absorbs odors. To prevent this from happening do not use a wooden spatula when working with chocolate. It is also important to store your chocolate away from items with strong smells, or your chocolate may begin to smell (and taste) like them.
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Chocolate Garnish Basics

Chocolate Garnish Basics | Pulled sugar | Scoop.it
Chocolate garnishes make the perfect addition to any dessert.
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Sweet, smooth, and decadent, chocolate makes for great garnishes for desserts.  There are multiple  ways that you can use chocolate as a garnish.  You can use grated chocolate, chocolate lace shards, chocolate lace, chocolate leaves, and chocolate curls.  

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What is Pulled Sugar?

What is Pulled Sugar? | Pulled sugar | Scoop.it
Pulled sugar is sugar that has been heated and specially handled to make a glossy and smooth mass, which can then be made into...
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Pulled sugar is sugar that was heated so it turns into a glossy and smooth mass.  You can shape it into anything that you can think of as in different shapes, flowers, and can also be made into bubbles. You make bubbles and other blown sugar designs by putting the pulled sugar onto a straw.  Pulled sugar is used as decorations on cakes center pieces and sometimes just as candy.  

 

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robert McGowan's comment, March 6, 2014 10:30 AM
It isn't too challenging to make pulled sugar, but it does have a risk to get burns when working with it. It involves boiling the sugar and then you have to work with it immediately so it turns out right. Make sure you have the proper equipment to work with it.
robert McGowan's comment, March 6, 2014 10:31 AM
"To make pulled sugar, five cups of sugar are mixed with one cup and two tablespoons of water, along with two tablespoons and one teaspoon of vinegar. The mixture is stirred together and slowly heated; it is important to ensure that all the sugar crystals dissolve, and that none crust along the sides of the pot, as they can crystallize and ruin the effect. When the boiled sugar reaches 320 degrees Fahrenheit (160 degrees Celsius), it should be poured out onto a silicone mat and folded." -wisegeek
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How to Make Pulled Sugar | eHow

How to Make Pulled Sugar | eHow | Pulled sugar | Scoop.it
For a cake or dessert centerpiece, there is nothing more elegant and impressive than edible decorations. Sugar is a clay, the baker a sculptor. Sugar can be formed into just about any shape you can imagine. When liquefied and heated, it becomes pliable enough for a few moments to be sculpted into objects, ribbons and decorations. The process of...
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There is nothing that is a better decoration on a cake centerpiece or dessert than decorations that are edible.  Sugar is like a clay and the baker is the sculptor. Sugar is able to be formed into any design that you want to.  When you heat it up and liquify it, it becomes soft enough to work with and shape into the decorations that you want.  

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3D printer creates chocolate sculpture of your face - Telegraph

3D printer creates chocolate sculpture of your face - Telegraph | Pulled sugar | Scoop.it
A chocolate 3D image can be created by building up layers of dark, milk or white chocolate
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"Choc Edge," the company that creates the chocolate sculptures charges between 50 Euros and 80 Euros.  The customers send their image of themselves  through their website and the sculpture is made of dark, milk,or white chocolate.  

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Chocolateteers - Chocolateteers

Chocolateteers, for the coinnessuer of all things chocolate and cocao.
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The chocolate that we know of today didn't happen that way for many years.  The cacao beans were originally ground up and served in drinks  that were served hot or cold.  The Mayan people thought that the bean had restorative health properties.  Drinks were the most common use of the bean but it was also used as a spice to flavor variety of foods.  The cacao bean was so important it was also used a currency for hundreds of years.  The cacao bean was eventually restricted to only upper class because only the wealthy were able to afford it.  

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Pulled Sugar Ribbons & Bows

Pulled Sugar Ribbons & Bows | Pulled sugar | Scoop.it
Recently, I made a goal to improve my sugar ribbon technique. The goal was to create sugar ribbons with thin stripes, satiny shine, and minimal grains. I wished to achieve this with sugar, not isom...
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robert McGowan's comment, March 5, 2014 10:23 AM
"The Effect of Acid:<br><br>For an in-depth look at the effect of acid on sugar, see this research article from the Center for Advanced Food Science and Technology, Korea University, “The Effect of Organic Acids on the Hygroscopity and Browning of Sugar Candies”<br><br>To summarize, acid inverts (also known as hydrolysis) sugar by acting as a catalyst, speeding up the split of sucrose (common granulated sugar), into glucose and fructose.<br><br>The effect of acid on pulled sugar art:<br><br>Reduces crystallization<br>Increases attraction to moisture/ stickiness<br>Increases softness/fluidity and elasticity<br>Darkens colour<br>Glucose also prevents crystallization, as noted in the article." -Rose Sen
robert McGowan's comment, March 5, 2014 10:24 AM
"Troubleshooting:<br><br>The challenge for me was determining the cause of grains.<br><br>In my trials, grains appeared immediately upon pulling the sugar, done shortly after boiling and cooling. This led me to believe the ingredients or recipes themselves were the factors.<br><br>From my research, there appear to be multiple possible causes of grains. This includes, but is not limited to:<br><br>purity of the ingredients<br>cleanliness of the equipment<br>length of time the sugar is boiled<br>temperature the acid is added<br>Batch upon batch resulted in grains. I tried to eliminate factors one by one. Frustration began to settle in and I really began to question. Were the textbooks fooling me? Were they leaving information out? Where the images photo shopped? Did their cameras have filters and lenses that only focused on the grain-free portions of the ribbon? Was isomalt used? Was the purity of the sugar, glucose or water itself the issue?<br><br>I began modifying recipes, which created interesting results:" -Rose Sen
robert McGowan's comment, March 5, 2014 10:26 AM
"My Tips…<br><br>The consistency of the sugar should not be too firm or too soft:<br><br>A sugar too firm results in difficulty in sticking strands together, breakage while pulling, difficulty in folding, and greater time & temperature to warm up<br>A sugar that is soft is easier to pull and form ribbons, but will not hold shape, absorb moisture easily, and lose shine quickly.<br>I prefer to err on the side of a stiff sugar consistency rather than a soft one. Ambient temperature and humidity also play a factor. The ideal consistency is where:<br><br>Initial strands barely adhere to each other without excessive heat<br>The ribbon pulls without excessive breaking or cracking<br>The ribbon sets shape quickly without the addition of cool air (depending on thickness).<br>The ribbon holds shape overnight, without deforming.<br>When a piece is broken, the ribbon appears as round ropes stuck together:" Rose Sen
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bake | baking news | Pulled Sugar Recipe

bake | baking news | Pulled Sugar Recipe | Pulled sugar | Scoop.it
News updates, insights and coverage of bakeries, donut chains, bagel chains, bakery cafes, foodservice operations, patisseries, cake shops, cupcake shops, and consumer purchasing trends.
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robert McGowan's comment, March 7, 2014 10:27 AM
"320 g / 11 oz. corn syrup<br>1g / 1/2 tsp. cream of tartar, dissolved in a little water<br><br>Place sugar and water into a clean pot. Stir over low heat to dissolve sugar. Skim foam from the surface using a tea strainer or ladle (these are natural impurities that will cause the pulled sugar to be dull and streaky). Bring to a boil, then add corn syrup and cream of tartar mixture. DO NOT STIR. Wash down pan sides with a wet pastry brush to prevent crystallization (keeping a lid on the pot as it comes to a boil will minimize crystallization). Repeat the skimming/washing 3-4 times until the sugar is nice and clear. place candy thermometer into syrup. Turn up heat to high. If desired, add color (powdered color dissolved into a little water) at 280F (138C). Boil until the syrup reaches 305-315F (150-157C). The lower temperature is better for beginners because the sugar will be softer and easier to pull. the higher temp wil provide a more brilliant finished product.<br><br>Isomalt for pulling/blowing <br>908g / 2 lb. Isomalt<br>65g / 1/4 cup water<br>1 tsp. cream of tartar<br><br>Ad all ingredients to clean pot. Cream of tartar is optional, but is better for beginners, as it makes for a softer, stretchier medium to work with. Stir over low heat to dissolve Isomalt. Bring to a boil. Place candy thermometer into syrup and raise heat to high. If desired, add color and/or flavor at 300F (149C). Boil until the syrup reaches 340F (171C).<br><br>Preparing to pull <br>Pour syrup onto Silpat(s) or lightly oiled marble. As it cools, fold the outside edges toward the center. If desired, divide the sugar into portions and add some past color and/or candy flavoring and continue folding it to ensure even cooling. Continue folding until the sugar is cool enough to handle but still warm. Start pulling the sugar by holding it down with one hand and stretching it until it begins taking on a glossy, shiny satin texture. You will need to pull and fold the sugar approximately 10-20 times to achieve the proper appearance. the satin look is created by the crystallization of the sugar. Do not pull the sugar more than necessary, as it will crystallize too much and lose its shine. Place the sugar in the warming box." -B. Keith Ryder