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Publishing
Evolution and innovation in publishing, scholarly and otherwise
Curated by Andrew Spong
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total-Impact: disclosing the invisible impacts of academic research

total-Impact: disclosing the invisible impacts of academic research | Publishing | Scoop.it

New tool total-Impact 'uncovers the invisible impacts of your research'

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80 percent of books sell fewer than 100 copies

80 percent of books sell fewer than 100 copies | Publishing | Scoop.it

Derek Haines (@derek_haines) writes:

 

'Out of at least 1.2 million titles published by the entire industry over the course of a year, almost 80% sell fewer than 100 copies'.

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e-book piracy: opportunity or threat?

e-book piracy: opportunity or threat? | Publishing | Scoop.it

'With 80 to 90 percent of people ready to pay, the publishing industry should be able to live.'

 

[AS: some useful discussion around some of the statistics concerning unlicensed e-book redistribution, but I'm afraid the emphasis on 'opportunity' is mine rather than the article's. #thereifyoucanseeit]

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Scientist meets Publisher: the insanity of academic publishing

"Your manuscript has been accepted by the journal I own. Just sign here." http://www.OpenAccessWeek.org, http://www.OpenAccessPledge.com

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New scholarly uses of Twitter

New scholarly uses of Twitter | Publishing | Scoop.it
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Really, what has Princeton done?

Really, what has Princeton done? | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Open access policies are not, at their root, either “land grabs” by institutions or acts of defiance aimed at publishers.

 

They are simply a recognition of the fact that authors are the initial owners of copyright, and they express a desire by those owners to manage their rights intentionally and in a way that most clearly benefits the goals of scholarship.'

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Access all areas?

Access all areas? | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Traditional academic publishers obtain their material for free – scholars are generally not paid to publish their work, nor undertake peer review.

 

Impact factors aside, it could be argued that scientists have little to lose, certainly financially, by publishing their work in the open access arena.'

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Amazon’s grip tightens on the entire book-publishing chain

Amazon’s grip tightens on the entire book-publishing chain | Publishing | Scoop.it

'As more customers adopt Kindles, iPads and other devices that make e-books more attractive, the print-to-digital shift will start snowballing.

 

By expanding its own publishing arm, Amazon accelerates the rate at which traditional publishers could find themselves entirely cut out of the supply chain.'

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How to hack academic book publishing

How to hack academic book publishing | Publishing | Scoop.it

A book based on the Hacking the Academy project is now online and soon will be available in print from Digital Culture Books, the innovative open access imprint of the University of Michigan Press - also known as MPub.

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How Twitter will revolutionise academic research and teaching

How Twitter will revolutionise academic research and teaching | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Academics are trained to manage data streams and to make informed appraisals of the sources we find. These skills suit social media perfectly; what is still needed is to develop strategies to listen to our peers and audiences better, and to learn how to react publicly.

 

Twitter can considerably level the playing field: you are not on the podium or on a stage. It is not meant to be an auditorium, but a seminar room.'

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Publish or perish: peer review and the corruption of science

Publish or perish: peer review and the corruption of science | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Peer review is the process that decides whether your work gets published in an academic journal. It doesn't work very well any more, mainly as a result of the enormous number of papers that are being published (an estimated 1.3 million papers in 23,750 journals in 2006).

 

There simply aren't enough competent people to do the job. The overwhelming effect of the huge (and unpaid) effort that is put into reviewing papers is to maintain a status hierarchy of journals. Any paper, however bad, can now get published in a journal that claims to be peer-reviewed.'

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Future students will construct their own communication platforms if they don't like yours. And they won't.

Future students will construct their own communication platforms if they don't like yours. And they won't. | Publishing | Scoop.it

'If you’ve been brought up with facebook, you will expect scholarly communication to work the same way.'

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Full open access to scholarly monographs: a local library consortial approach

Full open access to scholarly monographs: a local library consortial approach | Publishing | Scoop.it

'If libraries could collaborate to fund a scholarly monograph publishing system at one third of the current system, and if we could furthermore work with scholars towards a healthier scholarly communication system favoring appropriate publication over quantity of publication, then perhaps we could fund a system at perhaps one sixth of what libraries currently collectively pay that would be a very great deal more effective - free access to everyone with an internet connection, no crazy copyright restrictions, full searchability, and value added services thanks to publisher partners.'

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e-books edging out traditional print

e-books edging out traditional print | Publishing | Scoop.it

"In North America, depending on whose numbers you want to believe, e-books are already 15-25 per cent of book business," said Bill McCoy, executive director of International Digital Publishing Forum.

 

"Amazon is saying that they're selling more e-books than hardcover books. And in many cases, depending on the title, they might be selling more e-books than physical books."

 

Europe, he said, is a couple of years behind the North American market, and that consumer adoption has not been as quick due to fear of piracy and loss of control over the market.

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Amazon wants writers to view them as publisher as well as route to market

Amazon wants writers to view them as publisher as well as route to market | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Amazon.com has taught readers that they do not need bookstores. Now it is encouraging writers to cast aside their publishers.'

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Smart publishers love Amazon

Smart publishers love Amazon | Publishing | Scoop.it

Andrew Spong (@andrewspong) writes:

 

'Much as I enjoy receiving Booktrade.info‘s news digest by email on a daily basis, it has of late become a ceaseless litany of misery.

 

Sales down. Retailers closing. Publishers in turmoil.

 

And yet: this has to be the most exciting time to be a reader, writer and publisher since the fifteenth century.'

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The present and the future of academic publishing

The present and the future of academic publishing | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Academic publishing remains one of the most mysterious industries to me even after being caught in its web for a while.'

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Genre fiction continues to lead the way in digital publishing innovation

Genre fiction continues to lead the way in digital publishing innovation | Publishing | Scoop.it

An innovative idea from Orion to repackage its backlist digitally in a way that adds value and appeal has now gone live.

 

'SF Gateway' looks, feels and reads like a success story in the making. It is not surprising that genre fiction, which has been the source of so much e-publishing innovation, should continue to lead the way.

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WatchMojo signs more academic publishers to offer video content

WatchMojo signs more academic publishers to offer video content | Publishing | Scoop.it

Just in time for back to school season, WatchMojo has added Express Publishing and Lungteng to the list of publishers who rely on WatchMojo’s video content to serve students and teachers. Previous publishers who work with WatchMojo include
Belin, Pearson, Cengage and Nelson.

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Academic publishing issues in Computer Science

Academic publishing issues in Computer Science | Publishing | Scoop.it

'As the new school year gets underway, a few snapshots from the current state of affairs with respect to scholarly research and academic publishing in the Computer Science field'

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From the UK to California, universities are refusing to renew expensive journal subscriptions

From the UK to California, universities are refusing to renew expensive journal subscriptions | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Like newspapers and the music business, scholarly publishing has been drastically affected by the Internet. But the differences are as striking as the parallels. Unlike journalists, most academics are paid for research or teaching, not writing.

 

Yet all academics need to publish their work — to share and validate their research and also, crucially, to advance their careers.'

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Scholastica's comment, September 19, 2011 2:10 PM
Thanks for this. Excellent info! Your entire Scoop.it is pretty informative.

- Team Scholastica
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As print book revenues plunge, e-books aren’t making it up

As print book revenues plunge, e-books aren’t making it up | Publishing | Scoop.it

Print books are heading towards becoming a niche format for 'hardback, paperback and mass market content', in the same way that vinyl now is for music.

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Laura Brown's comment, September 16, 2011 12:28 PM
I still prefer paperbacks. The time I get to read is usually in bed at night. Sometimes I fall asleep with the lights on and find the book on the floor in the morning. No ebook reader can take the abuse a paperback book does.
Andrew Spong's comment, September 17, 2011 1:51 AM
Hi Laura. Me too, as it happens :) However, I wonder how much longer we're going to be able to buy new ones... :-/
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Amazon steps up social media efforts

Amazon steps up social media efforts | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Amazon.com Inc is stepping up social media efforts after the largest Internet retailer partially missed one of the hottest technology trends of recent years.'

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