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Publishing
Evolution and innovation in publishing, scholarly and otherwise
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UK Publishers moan about content mining's possible problems; dismiss other countries' actual experience

UK Publishers moan about content mining's possible problems; dismiss other countries' actual experience | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Moving their academic titles to open access would actually give UK publishers a big advantage, since open access continues to sweep through the academic sector. It would mean that UK publishers were leading the way, rather than dragging their heels at the back.'

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Decoupling the scholarly journal

Decoupling the scholarly journal | Publishing | Scoop.it

'By "decoupling" the functions now maintained journal-by-journal, using the Web to manage publication processes instead. It would be very easy to post an article online, get initial feedback, and revise it before final "certification" by a qualified body. In this scenario there are three services--hosting the article; peer review; final certification. But here they are managed in a "Web-like environment of loosely joined pieces," rather than in a vertically integrated publication process.

 

Separating the pieces of the scholarly communication system apart makes it possible to fix/improve/modify one element without disrupting everything. The market can work its magic, as scholars pick and choose among registration services rather than simply submitting to the same old journals. The unit of discourse becomes whatever the scholar wishes to share, rather than only the article.'

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Scribd seeks to upend traditional publishing

Scribd seeks to upend traditional publishing | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Social reading and publishing site Scribd lets users share documents ranging from best-selling books to academic papers and presentations across the Web.

 

In the last few months, the company has also unveiled a mobile application called Float that makes it easier for readers to view documents on their smartphones by stripping down Web pages into a cleaner format without pesky ads and external links. Float also provides reading recommendations from friends and followers on social networks like Facebook and Twitter.'

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Penn physicians point to patient narratives to bolster case of evidence-based medicine » Westmoreland Times

Penn physicians point to patient narratives to bolster case of evidence-based medicine » Westmoreland Times | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Doctors should consider the use of narrative — in the form of patient stories and testimonials — as a powerful tool for translating and communicating evidence-based policies to the public to buoy buy-in on important health issues such as cancer screenings and vaccination mandates, according to two physicians from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania writing this week in JAMA.

 

They suggest two strategies: The use of so-called “counternarratives,” which can play a role in neutralizing personal stories – often promoted by celebrities via the news media — that support disproven theories, and narratives about the process of scientific study and discovery, to unmask the often hidden work of researchers and guidelines committees.'

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Can we save scholarly publishing?

Can we save scholarly publishing? | Publishing | Scoop.it

Neurobiologist Bjoern Brembs (@brembs) writes:

 

'Scholarly publishing is badly broken, but not beyond repair. The exorbitant profits that corporate publishers currently extract from the taxpayer provide an enticing avenue out of the current misery.

 

If university libraries were to cancel or reduce subscription contracts with corporate publishers in a step-wise fashion and, importantly, in excess of what budget constraints already force them to do, they would have increasingly larger funds at their disposal. These funds would, at the end of that probably many year long process, all else remaining equal, amount to approx. 2-4 billion Euros per annum.

 

These funds could, from the very first year on, be used to invest in the necessary infrastructure which would provide much of the functionality which scholarly publishing is so bitterly lacking today. I predict that the ensuing lack of access will win support rather than opposition from the affected faculty, if some of the funds are diverted towards intermediary open access funding or color/page charges.'

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What happens when you tweet an Open Access paper

What happens when you tweet an Open Access paper | Publishing | Scoop.it

Melissa Terras (@melissaterras) writes:

 

'I have no idea how many times it is read, accessed, downloaded in the journal itself. So seeing this - 500 reads in a week! makes me think, wow: people are reading something I have written!

 

It must be all relative, surely. Is 500 full downloads good? Who can tell? All I can say is that it puts it into the top 10 - maybe top 5 - papers downloaded from the UCL repository last month (I wont know until someone updates the webpage with last months stats).

 

If I tell you that the most accessed item from our department ever in the UCL repository, which was put in there five years ago, has had 1000 full text downloads, then 500 downloads in a week ain't too shabby.'

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eLife open access science journal leaves editing to the experts

eLife open access science journal leaves editing to the experts | Publishing | Scoop.it

'A new open-access life and biomedical sciences journal, conceived with the aim of transforming research communication and speeding up the publication process, has announced its title and editorial team.

 

The journal, supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Max Planck Society and the Wellcome Trust, will be known as eLife. The name is designed to articulate its online, open-access nature and its coverage of a wide range of life and biomedical sciences.

 

eLife’s first issue is expected late next year, and Professor Weigel has high hopes for its impact in a field dominated by subscription-based journals.

 

“Our ambition is to make this a unique journal that will serve as a catalyst for the broader reinvention of research communication,” he said.'

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What is peer review for?

What is peer review for? | Publishing | Scoop.it

Bradley Voytek (@bradleyvoytek) writes:

 

'I’m not saying publishing papers is bad. Synthesis of ideas allows us to publicly establish hypotheses for other scientists to attempt to disprove. But most results that are published are minor extensions of current understanding that don’t merit long-form manuscripts.

 

But the current system of journals, editors who act as gatekeepers, one to three anonymous peer-reviewers, and so on is an outdated system built before technology provided better, more dynamic alternatives.

 

Why do scientists–the heralds of exploration and new ideas in our society–settle for such a sub-optimal system that is nearly 350 years old?'

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The two biggest advantages of publishing in an Open Access journal

The two biggest advantages of publishing in an Open Access journal | Publishing | Scoop.it

Graham Steel (@mcdawg) writes:

 

'It is known [link to SPARC embedded in main post] that two big advantages of having a Manuscript accepted for publication in an Open Access Journal are:

 

a) Wider readership, and

b) A likely higher number of Citations'

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Living in occupied scholarly territory

Living in occupied scholarly territory | Publishing | Scoop.it

We have ceded the homeland of Scholarly Publishing to the commercial closed access publishers. For me the only true goal is that we regain the ability to control our scholarship – authoring, publishing, reading, re-use. I don’t see many people actively formulating this goal and doing something about it. I don’t think many people, even in the OA community, actually care about this. I haven’t formulated it well, but that’s because there has been a 10-year vacuum of thought and action.

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E-Ink Holdings' record quarter looks beyond Amazon 'slump' to e-book dominance

E-Ink Holdings' record quarter looks beyond Amazon 'slump' to e-book dominance | Publishing | Scoop.it

The world’s largest e-reader display manufacturer posted record high results last quarter, and declared that e-reader devices are “recession-proof” in the run up to the holiday season.

 

[AS: This is the future-watching 'glass half-full' reading of today's stories about Amazon's sharp dip in profit to a (still more than respectable, all things considered) $63m profit in the face of heavy e-reader investment.]

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Will Amazon kill off book publishers?

Will Amazon kill off book publishers? | Publishing | Scoop.it

What happens when more writers have the option of a one-stop shop: agent, publisher and bookseller.

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Should publishers abandon filter>publish printed books in favour of publish>filter ebooks?

Should publishers abandon filter>publish printed books in favour of publish>filter ebooks? | Publishing | Scoop.it

John Miedema writes:

 

'In my vision, let every book be published digitally, the more the better. Those books found worthy may deserve another publication in print. The stores and shelves of print books would shrink, cleared of fluff, distilled to the very best works.'

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Introducing Annotum: a scholarly publishing platform built on WordPress

Introducing Annotum: a scholarly publishing platform built on WordPress | Publishing | Scoop.it

Devin Reams writes:

 

'[Annotum] is a sophisticated authoring and publishing platform with numerous features baked in. Originally designed with scientific and scholarly journals in mind, this is a great all-around theme for any publishers.

 

Knol users can now download their existing content via Google Takeout and take it wherever they’d like and/or set up a Annotum-based WordPress.com blog with a one-click(ish) process.'

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Overpriced, royalty-grabbing, & truly awful: Self-published authors on Penguin’s Book Country

Overpriced, royalty-grabbing, & truly awful: Self-published authors on Penguin’s Book Country | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Many popular self-published authors are coming down hard on the self-publishing services that Penguin added to community writing site Book Country earlier this week, calling the initiative overpriced, royalty-grabbing and “truly awful.”'

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Booksellers 'face unfair competition from charity book shops'

Booksellers 'face unfair competition from charity book shops' | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Charity book shops which operate like professional businesses should not benefit from receiving tax and business rate concessions, says the Booksellers Association (BA).

 

The statement follows a strong concern from high-street booksellers that tax breaks received by charity bookshops give them an unjust competitive advantage over other bookshops.

 

The BA argues that many charity book shops are professionally run and staffed by experienced retailers and in many instances believe charity retail units affect adversely the rateable values of neighbouring properties. One charity is believed to have more outlets in the UK selling books than the largest specialty bookshop.'

 

[AS: doesn't the Booksellers Association have better things to do? This is embarrassing.]

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Siri? How do I fix academic publishing?

Siri? How do I fix academic publishing? | Publishing | Scoop.it

The Digital Campus podcasters discuss 'how much money is being made publishing academic journals by just a few publishing houses and why open access scholarship is so necessary to the circulation of knowledge'

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Where to find new scholarly research papers: 30 key, free websites

Where to find new scholarly research papers: 30 key, free websites | Publishing | Scoop.it

Roddy MacLeod writes:

 

'Below, I’ve listed 30 freely available websites and services that help anyone find details of new scholarly research.

 

These are services which link directly to research papers or reports or conference papers or pre-prints or theses which have appeared in journals or subject/institutional repositories, or elsewhere; and especially services which produce RSS feeds, because I’m always interested in RSS, as RSS can be an excellent facility for keeping up-to-date.'

 

 

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Only 13% of publishers believe the industry is reskilling fast enough

Only 13% of publishers believe the industry is reskilling fast enough | Publishing | Scoop.it

The Bookseller's (@thebookseller) Digital Book Census surveyed more than 2,200 people, nearly three quarters of whom work in the industry.

 

Fewer than one in seven (13.4%) respondents thought the publishing industry to be reskilling fast enough to cope with digital challenges.

 

[AS: If the industry itself perceives this and yet does nothing about it, it richly deserves to crash and burn.]

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Kindle lending: Book publishers still not getting it

Kindle lending: Book publishers still not getting it | Publishing | Scoop.it

Matthew Ingram (@matthewi) writes:

 

The big six book publishers are already behind the eight ball when it comes to the digital disruption of their business: Amazon, for example, is not only helping writers distribute their books without needing a publisher at all, but is also moving in on the traditional players by signing up authors itself.

 

So what do these publishers do? Try to compete by offering more digital features and benefits for writers? No. They drag their feet and resist adapting as much as possible. Case in point: Amazon launches a lending program for the Kindle, a kind of “Netflix for books.”

 

How many of the major publishers are involved? Zero.'

 

[AS: it's just *so* obvious that the Amazon model, ported from the rental or licensing of other media such as movies, is the future of paid content. The only people that don't want to admit it are publishers. Protectionism is not a business model. How many of the Big 6 will get this before they shrink to the point that they're just Other Publishers?]

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Why the world of scientific research needs to be disrupted

Why the world of scientific research needs to be disrupted | Publishing | Scoop.it

Award-winning quantum physicist Michael Nielsen says that the closed and disconnected nature of most research is holding back scientific progress in important ways, and that we need to foster a new kind of “networked science” if we want to make new discoveries faster.

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By championing open access publishing, the academic community can bring us closer to making research available to all.

By championing open access publishing, the academic community can bring us closer to making research available to all. | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Open access publishing increases the likelihood that academic research will be a top Google search hit for policy-makers, journalists and NGOs who use the internet to seek out research to inform their policies.'

 

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Chirpstory: a pragmatic story-telling alternative to Storify?

Chirpstory: a pragmatic story-telling alternative to Storify? | Publishing | Scoop.it

Jo Brodie (@JoBrodie) writes:

 

'Two problems [regarding the use of Storify to produce Tweet-driven narratives] arise when a conference generates a lot of tweets: (1) there's the danger that in clicking and dragging so many you'll get them out of order and (2) it's a bit hard work.

 

For larger numbers of tweets I've found Chirpstory to be the more pragmatic choice. You can move a page worth of tweets (I think it's 20 tweets) so rather than having to do something to each one of 100 tweets you want to collect you can do it five times to five pages of them.'

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ruthseeley's comment, October 28, 2011 10:30 AM
Thank you! I tried to use Storify once and it was SO much work I just gave up. Will check out Chirpstory as I'm planning a chat I want to capture for a subsequent blog post for those who miss the chat.
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Do readers want ebooks to be more social?

Do readers want ebooks to be more social? | Publishing | Scoop.it

Is the biggest thing e-books need right now really something to make them more social?

 

Startup Subtext is gambling on the fact that despite engaging in a solitary, immersive activity, e-book readers secretly just want to have conversations with everyone about what they’re reading.

 

[AS: whilst I balk at this concept personally as on the basis that I view reading to be one of the last bastions of solitude and quiet reflection that the modern world affords us, I can see the possibility that reading habits may change to turn reading into a social activity. The oral tradition of story-telling began as a social event after all, so perhaps there is some logic to the idea.]

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Open access and scholarly publishing: time to tear down the paywalls?

Open access and scholarly publishing: time to tear down the paywalls? | Publishing | Scoop.it

' For researchers, being published in the right sort of journals is no vanity project. It’s a matter of huge importance, with very real implications for people’s careers.

 

These journals are the sounding board for new ideas; they validate and advance particular disciplines; they are seen as a reliable reference point, the tried and trusted tools of the trade.

 

But does that mean journals should continue to expect to take copyright from their authors and charge often substantial fees just to read them?'

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