Publishing
Follow
Find
4.9K views | +0 today
Publishing
Evolution and innovation in publishing, scholarly and otherwise
Curated by Andrew Spong
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

'Boycotting Elsevier is not enough: it's time to make them invisible'

'Boycotting Elsevier is not enough: it's time to make them invisible' | Publishing | Scoop.it

Jonathan Eisen (@phylogenomics) writes:

 

'Don't blog about papers in Elsevier journals. Don't tweet about them. Don't use Elsevier papers for journal clubs. In essence, ignore them - consider them dead - make them invisible.

 

Not completely of course. Any work should be considered a contribution to science or math or whatever your field is. But there are LOTS and LOTS of things to do with your time. And if you like to share - to communicate - to discuss - it is easy to find non Elsevier articles articles for those purposes (even better - pick open access articles).'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Jonathan Franzen: 'e-books are damaging society'

Jonathan Franzen: 'e-books are damaging society' | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Jonathan Franzen has launched a passionate defence of the printed book,
warning that our desire for the instant gratification of e-books is damaging
for society.'

 

[AS: ...which the reader-commentators in this Telegraph piece set about with great gusto.]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Apple's iBooks Author: an evil, rights-hoarding abomination?

Apple's iBooks Author: an evil, rights-hoarding abomination? | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Apple is trying to establish a rule that whatever I create with this application, if I sell it, I have to give them a cut. And iBooks Author is free, so this arrangement sounds pretty reasonable.

 

Here’s the problem: I didn’t agree to it.'

more...
Stephen Tiano's comment, January 20, 2012 5:00 AM
Is the dilemma. I mean, I've wanted to see the iPad take advantage of its great ability to consume content in a way that would open opportunities for creating content. But, yes, there is an issue with them dictating how much I can rake in on each book. Then again, don't all the expenses associated with publishing or self-publishing print books--publishers' and agents' cuts; expenses for editors, designers, typesetter, etc.--also ,ake for a limitation?
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Informing public access to peer reviewed scholarly publications and data resulting from publicly funded research

Informing public access to peer reviewed scholarly publications and data resulting from publicly funded research | Publishing | Scoop.it

Mark MacGillivray writes:

 

'The US government (OSTP) has recently issued an RFI on Open Access to data resulting from publicly funded research. The deadline for responding to the RFI has been extended to January 12.

 

http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2011/12/21/extended-deadline-public-access-and-digital-data-rfis

 

Detailed responses are openly available for collaborative editing and signing, here:

 

For digital data – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1QA1eGBynqh-yN0bo3_nYzD3d26nEhvuVPMUR2ffi17o/edit?hl=en_US

 

For peer reviewed scholarly publications – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vEcWqAz6bwIIR6qQqWZYc8iUBrOpJ9NrvC9HiiQMc2Y/edit?hl=en_US

 

I request that anyone with an interest in scholarship responds in advocacy of open access, either via the above responses or directly to the OSTP. I justify my request not by re-iterating the virtues of open access (there are plenty), but by countering a common basis of closed access arguments: I propose that open access can be profitable, if profit is desired. (Although I admit that my motivation is for learning stuff, not making money.)'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The 7 habits of spectacularly unsuccessful publishing executives

The 7 habits of spectacularly unsuccessful publishing executives | Publishing | Scoop.it

1. They see themselves and their companies as dominating their environment

2. They identify so completely with the company that there is no clear boundary between their personal interests and their corporation’s interests

3. They think they have all the answers

4. They ruthlessly eliminate anyone who isn’t completely behind them

5. They are consummate spokespersons, obsessed with the company image

6. They underestimate obstacles

7. They stubbornly rely on what worked for them in the past

 

[AS: Not designed around publishing, I know, but it seems to map perfectly]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Do we really need copyright for academic publishing?

Do we really need copyright for academic publishing? | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Perhaps copyright protects the wrong thing for academics: what they really care about is credit for the ideas their papers contain, not how they phrased them.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Ten Bold Predictions for Book Publishing in 2012

Ten Bold Predictions for Book Publishing in 2012 | Publishing | Scoop.it

'We spoke with book industry experts, observers and players to get their bold predictions on what extraordinary events await us in the coming twelve months.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Amazon's plans to give Indie authors a leg up

Amazon's plans to give Indie authors a leg up | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Amazon really wants to attract more independent authors to its publishing platform. It also wants to add competitive muster to its Kindle Store for e-books and the new Kindle e-book lending library.

 

In a move designed to achieve both goals, the company today announced the launch of KDP Select, a program that gives Kindle Direct Publishing authors an incentive to participate in Amazon's e-book lending initiative.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Europeans want disease info not contests from Pharma

Europeans want disease info not contests from Pharma | Publishing | Scoop.it

A new Manhattan Research study suggests that 'online consumers in Italy show the strongest desire to learn about drugs from the companies themselves, while their counterparts in Germany are the least likely to be interested. Additionally, certain patient groups across Europe overall, such as online users diagnosed with acute pain, osteoporosis and arrhythmia, show a higher interest in this type of information from pharma than the average citizen. However, they want "practical online resources", such as disease and treatment information and condition management tools, rather than "online contests and games".

 

Furthermore, Manhattan Research identified " a lack of interest in pharma on Facebook and Twitter".

 

Among people who are already using or are interested in online information and tools from pharmaceutical companies, only 13% want to access this content on Facebook and 5% on Twitter. In contrast, 43% of this audience would like to obtain resources from websites about conditions and diseases.'

 

[AS: Clearly, the data as it is presented suggests that there are disconnects here. What do these 'practical online resources' look like? And how is Pharma supposed to communicate that they exist if patients aren't interested in their facebook and Twitter presences? I'd like to see more cuts of this data.]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

'Scholarly Networking’, ‘Open Access’: are we asking the right questions?

'Scholarly Networking’, ‘Open Access’: are we asking the right questions? | Publishing | Scoop.it

James Harvey (@researchtoaction) writes:

 

'We need to consider how far we’ve moved towards a broader marketplace of access, interaction and exchange of ideas. Does ‘scholarly networking’ represent a radical step forward in knowledge sharing, or are we settling for ‘style’ over ‘content’ and pseudo-change with an academic flavour?

 

Social networking and computer mediated communications have consequences for scholarly communication. Perhaps it is time knowledge brokers and research communications practitioners revisited this dynamic with a critical eye.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

History repeats itself as squeezed publishers follow music industry into aggressive litigation

History repeats itself as squeezed publishers follow music industry into aggressive litigation | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Two weeks ago, publisher John Wiley made headlines by suing 27 internet users who were allegedly swapping editions of the popular “For Dummies” series online. The campaign appears to be working because John Wiley has now doubled-down on its effort by suing dozens more people. The prime targets this time include novice cooks and gardeners.

 

The litigation campaign reflects the fact that, in recent years, unauthorized file-sharing has become a problem for book publishers in the same way it has for the music and movie industry. In terms of file size, books are tiny compared to songs or videos and this makes it quick and easy for people to swap online copies.

 

Unlike a similar suit filed two weeks ago, the list of alleged offenders does not include many technology aficionados. Instead, the new list of miscreants is made up primarily of people from upstate New York towns like Rochester and Woodstock who shared “Cooking Basics For Dummies” and “Vegetable Gardening For Dummies.”'

 

[AS: Love the way this drips irony. If publishers believe they're 'protecting' revenues by sueing those who are interested in their content (i.e. past and future customers), it really is time to clear the desks.]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The Cost of Knowledge: 2,931 academics take a stand against Elsevier

The Cost of Knowledge: 2,931 academics take a stand against Elsevier | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Academics have protested against Elsevier's business practices for years with little effect. The main objections are these:

 

* They charge exorbitantly high prices for their journals.

* They sell journals in very large "bundles," so libraries must buy a large set with many unwanted journals, or none at all. Elsevier thus makes huge profits by exploiting their essential titles, at the expense of other journals.

* They support measures such as SOPA, PIPA and the Research Works Act, that aim to restrict the free exchange of information.

 

The key to all these issues is the right of authors to achieve easily-accessible distribution of their work. If you would like to declare publicly that you will not support any Elsevier journal unless they radically change how they operate, then you can do so by filling in your details in the box [accessible via the link above]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Digital Textbooks go straight from scientists to students

Digital Textbooks go straight from scientists to students | Publishing | Scoop.it

Duke University’s open-source effort - including the first interactive marine science textbook, illustrated above - represents a departure from Inkling and other commercial ventures. It sacrifices a wide offering of interactive features, monolithic downloads and wow-factor in exchange for simplicity, speed and flexibility. As new scientific knowledge enters a field, a leading academic could make a quick edit in FLOW to instantly and seamlessly update a student’s textbook.

 

As important as high-quality content is, the authors see the software’s open-source aspect as a crucial component of its future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Academic publishers have become the enemies of science

Academic publishers have become the enemies of science | Publishing | Scoop.it

Dr. Mike Taylor writes:

 

'What's good for science isn't necessarily good for science publishers, whose interests have drifted far out of alignment with ours. Under the old model, publishers become the owners of the papers they publish, holding the copyright and selling copies around the world – a useful service in pre-internet days.

 

But now that it's a trivial undertaking to make a paper globally available, there is no reason why scientists need yield copyright to publishers.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

A new world of ebooks in India

A new world of ebooks in India | Publishing | Scoop.it

Binoo K. John writes:

 

'Sadly, bookshops [in India] might have to be moved to the endangered list because book portals have taken over the job. The success of Flipkart means that several small bookshops in India have lost business and almost all of them might have to close. Two recent examples of closure in New Delhi: Oxford Book Shop (a joint venture between The Statesman and Oxford Book Store) and Bookworm (in Connaught Place).

 

Small bookshops cannot run in high markets anymore but retail chains like Odyssey, Landmark, etc., can hold out for longer by sales of peripherals and stationery. Smaller bookshops would turn to art and crafts to survive (like Quill and Canvas Gurgaon). The brew-while-you browse concept (coffee shop in a bookshop) seems to have failed because a coffee shop ambience needs to be different – the Oxford Bookshop had a tea counter but it still failed. Also, getting a restaurant license is problematic with inspectors seeking bribes. Books are tax-free and a bookshop need not even have a VAT account.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Elsevier-funded NY Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney Wants to Deny Americans Access to Taxpayer Funded Research

Elsevier-funded NY Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney Wants to Deny Americans Access to Taxpayer Funded Research | Publishing | Scoop.it

Michael Eisen writes:

 

'Why, you might ask, would Carolyn Maloney, representing a liberal Democratic district in New York City that is home to many research institutions, sponsor such a reactionary piece of legislation that benefits a group of wealthy publishers at the expense of the American public? Hmm. Wouldn’t happen to have anything to do with the fact that she’s the biggest recipient of campaign contributions from the publishing industry, would it?

 

According to MapLight, which tracks political contributions, Dutch publisher Elsevier and its senior executives made 31 contributions to members of the House in 2011, of which 12 went to Representative Maloney. This includes contributions from 11 senior executives or partners, only one of whom is a resident of her district.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Future sources of ebook innovation

Future sources of ebook innovation | Publishing | Scoop.it

Baldur Bjarnason notes that 'none of [his four suggestions] are in any way related to the big publishing companies, which will have to work very hard just to remain in publishing in ten years time.'

 

1. Reading systems

2. Licensing models

3. Non-traditional entrants

4. Disruptive innovations

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Publishing: no predictions, just questions

Publishing: no predictions, just questions | Publishing | Scoop.it

Mike Shatzkin's (@MikeShatzkin) end of year post.

 

[AS: I love Shatzkin's quietly provocative style, and the way that certain radical assumptions are interpolated into his formulations.

 

Will 2012 be the year that the publishing community on the social web loses its collegiate, clubbish air and adopts a harder edge as more of its members are laid off?]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Publishers are still missing the point on e-book prices

Publishers are still missing the point on e-book prices | Publishing | Scoop.it

Matthew Ingram writes:

 

'By keeping e-book prices high, the Big Six book publishers are not only getting less money from their books in many cases, but they are also fuelling piracy and pushing readers away -- all of which is giving Amazon even more ammunition to use.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Margaret Atwood on Social Media and the Internet as a driver of literacy

Margaret Atwood on Social Media and the Internet as a driver of literacy | Publishing | Scoop.it

Margaret Atwood (@MargaretAtwood) has observed:

 

"A lot of people on Twitter are dedicated readers. Twitter is like all of the other short forms that preceded it. It's like the telegram. It's like the smoke signal. It's like writing on the washroom wall. It's like carving your name on a tree.

 

It's a very short form and we use that very short form for very succinct purposes. There is a guy out there who is writing 140-character short stories — I just followed him today…but that's the exception. It's sort of like haikus [and] prose."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Competing with Amazon is not an easy thing to do

Competing with Amazon is not an easy thing to do | Publishing | Scoop.it

Mike Shatzkin (@MikeShatzkin) writes:

 

'When you read through this [http://bit.ly/vXkLGp] thread from Amazon’s online forum among authors discussing what happens when the retailer picks one of their books for a price promotion, you get a sense of the excitement they generate through the sales they can create with tools which are uniquely at their disposal.

 

What that probably means is that more and more authors will be available exclusively through Kindle, some because an Amazon imprint signed them and others because they don’t bother to put their books up on other sites for paltry sales. If that happens, Amazon’s natural advantages just grow.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Publishers struggle to adapt as digital revolution gathers pace

Publishers struggle to adapt as digital revolution gathers pace | Publishing | Scoop.it

'The industry has had a particularly difficult 2011, as the art of the paperback heads for its demise in favor of e-books. As a result, power is slowly transferring to internet retailers like Amazon, who catalyzed the market four years ago with its Kindle and e-book store.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Piracy: a service problem

Piracy: a service problem | Publishing | Scoop.it

'Gabe Newell, Valve managing director, has claimed that software piracy is a "non issue" for the company's Steam gaming service. Instead, he said that the fundamental misconception about piracy is that it is motivated by price, when Value believes that its more down to problems with service.

 

"For example, if a pirate offers a product anywhere in the world, 24/7, purchasable from the convenience of your personal computer, and the legal provider says the product is region-locked, will come to your country 3 months after the US release, and can only be purchased at a brick and mortar store, then the pirate's service is more valuable," he said, in an interview with Cambridge Student.'

more...
No comment yet.