Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids
36.7K views | +6 today
Follow
Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids
Interesting news, reviews & trends in children's digital publishing from founder of Digital-Storytime
Curated by Carisa Kluver
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Why the iPad has revolutionized bedtime reading for parents & kids ...

Why the iPad has revolutionized bedtime reading for parents & kids ... | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Lilup iPad Book App: A Good iPad Book App for Bedtime Reading. There is no getting around it. The iPad has transformed the reading habits of some of the littlest readers. The lines between reading and 'media' are even ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Google+ for iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS, and iPhone 4 on the iTunes App Store

Google+ for iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS, and iPhone 4 on the iTunes App Store | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Learn more, read reviews, and download Google+ by Google on the iTunes App Store. (http://t.co/IEoeNwY - Google+ for iPhone is now out.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Middle School iPad Apps

A collection of apps useful for middle school students, broken down by subject with suggested activities. Curated by Palm Beach Schools.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carisa Kluver from Writing and reading fiction
Scoop.it!

Joel Friedlander Interview – How Self-Publishing Has Changed

Joel Friedlander Interview – How Self-Publishing Has Changed | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
I had the pleasure of speaking with Joel Friedlander, the proprietor of Marin Bookworks where he helps self-publishers get ready to go to p...

Via Robert Chazz Chute
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carisa Kluver from Transmedia 4 Kids: Creating Content For Children
Scoop.it!

The Children's Media Conference, Broadcast Blog - How to Pitch Transmedia

The Children's Media Conference, Broadcast Blog - How to Pitch Transmedia | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
So you have the most amazing transmedia project and a meeting with a potential financier – how do you pitch it?
The truth is you don’t. There are no transmedia commissioners (in my opinion, yet).

Via cynthia jabar
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Facebook Etiquette to be Taught in School to Avoid Cyber Bullying

Parents and online experts are pushing for an 'urgent' proposal to teach Social networking etiquette in school to tackle cyber bullying.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Self-Publishing, Yes and No — The Book Designer

Self-Publishing, Yes and No — The Book Designer | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Self-Publishing, Yes and No, or what authors should be thinking about today (This intrigues me and upsets me at the same time.)...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Good Books for Kids Lists!: NY Times

Good Books for Kids Lists!: NY Times | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Good Books for Kids Lists brings you age appropriate book lists to use as reading resources for classroom and home.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

A Newbie's Guide to Publishing: One More Nail in the Coffin

A Newbie's Guide to Publishing: One More Nail in the Coffin | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
During my absence, two interesting things happened.

1. My Amazon-published ebook SHAKEN hit the Top 100 again on the Kindle bestseller list. I can only attribute this to some promo Amazon did, since I was off the grid and not doing anything.

2. It looks like Borders is going to liquidate.

This quickly tells me two things that I suspected all along. First, that signing a publishing deal with Amazon is a good thing. Who ever heard of a publisher doing a marketing push nine months after the book came out?

As I'm fond of saying, ebooks are forever, and Amazon is happy to support a backlist that lasts for infinity.

Second, if Borders goes bye-bye, the death spiral I predicted is right on course.

Here's something I said in that blog post:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

An Ex-Pixar Designer Creates Astounding Kids' Book On iPad | Co. Design

An Ex-Pixar Designer Creates Astounding Kids' Book On iPad | Co. Design | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Children's books should be well http://bit.ly/oCbtmI...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

21 Things That Will Be Obsolete by 2020 | MindShift

21 Things That Will Be Obsolete by 2020 | MindShift | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Inspired by Sandy Speicher’s vision of the designed school day of the future, reader Shelly Blake-Plock shared his own predictions of that ideal day. How close are we to this? The post was written in December 2009, and Blake-Plock says he’s seeing some of these already beginning to come to fruition.

[Update: I asked Blake-Plock to respond to comments to this post. Read it here.]

By Shelly Blake-Plock

1. DESKS
The 21st century does not fit neatly into rows. Neither should your students. Allow the network-based concepts of flow, collaboration, and dynamism help you rearrange your room for authentic 21st century learning.

2. LANGUAGE LABS
Foreign language acquisition is only a smartphone away. Get rid of those clunky desktops and monitors and do something fun with that room.

3. COMPUTERS
Ok, so this is a trick answer. More precisely this one should read: ‘Our concept of what a computer is’. Because computing is going mobile and over the next decade we’re going to see the full fury of individualized computing via handhelds come to the fore. Can’t wait.

4. HOMEWORK
The 21st century is a 24/7 environment. And the next decade is going to see the traditional temporal boundaries between home and school disappear. And despite whatever Secretary Duncan might say, we don’t need kids to ‘go to school’ more; we need them to ‘learn’ more. And this will be done 24/7 and on the move (see #3).

5. THE ROLE OF STANDARDIZED TESTS IN COLLEGE ADMISSIONS
The AP Exam is on its last legs. The SAT isn’t far behind. Over the next ten years, we will see Digital Portfolios replace test scores as the #1 factor in college admissions.

6. DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AS A SIGN OF DISTINGUISHED TEACHER
The 21st century is customizable. In ten years, the teacher who hasn’t yet figured out how to use tech to personalize learning will be the teacher out of a job. Differentiation won’t make you ‘distinguished’; it’ll just be a natural part of your work.

7. FEAR OF WIKIPEDIA
Wikipedia is the greatest democratizing force in the world right now. If you are afraid of letting your students peruse it, it’s time you get over yourself.

8. PAPERBACKS
Books were nice. In ten years’ time, all reading will be via digital means. And yes, I know, you like the ‘feel’ of paper. Well, in ten years’ time you’ll hardly tell the difference as ‘paper’ itself becomes digitized.

9. ATTENDANCE OFFICES
Bio scans. ‘Nuff said.

10. LOCKERS
A coat-check, maybe.

11. I.T. DEPARTMENTS
Ok, so this is another trick answer. More subtly put: IT Departments as we currently know them. Cloud computing and a decade’s worth of increased wifi and satellite access will make some of the traditional roles of IT — software, security, and connectivity — a thing of the past. What will IT professionals do with all their free time? Innovate. Look to tech departments to instigate real change in the function of schools over the next twenty years.

12. CENTRALIZED INSTITUTIONS
School buildings are going to become ‘homebases’ of learning, not the institutions where all learning happens. Buildings will get smaller and greener, student and teacher schedules will change to allow less people on campus at any one time, and more teachers and students will be going out into their communities to engage in experiential learning.

13. ORGANIZATION OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES BY GRADE
Education over the next ten years will become more individualized, leaving the bulk of grade-based learning in the past. Students will form peer groups by interest and these interest groups will petition for specialized learning. The structure of K-12 will be fundamentally altered.

14. EDUCATION SCHOOLS THAT FAIL TO INTEGRATE TECHNOLOGY
This is actually one that could occur over the next five years. Education Schools have to realize that if they are to remain relevant, they are going to have to demand that 21st century tech integration be modeled by the very professors who are supposed to be preparing our teachers.

15. PAID/OUTSOURCED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
No one knows your school as well as you. With the power of a PLN (professional learing networks) in their back pockets, teachers will rise up to replace peripatetic professional development gurus as the source of schoolwide professional development programs. This is already happening.

16. CURRENT CURRICULAR NORMS
There is no reason why every student needs to take however many credits in the same course of study as every other student. The root of curricular change will be the shift in middle schools to a role as foundational content providers and high schools as places for specialized learning.

17. PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCE NIGHT
Ongoing parent-teacher relations in virtual reality will make parent-teacher conference nights seem quaint. Over the next ten years, parents and teachers will become closer than ever as a result of virtual communication opportunities. And parents will drive schools to become ever more tech integrated.

18. TYPICAL CAFETERIA FOOD
Nutrition information + handhelds + cost comparison = the end of $3.00 bowls of microwaved mac and cheese. At least, I so hope so.

19. OUTSOURCED GRAPHIC DESIGN AND WEB DESIGN
You need a website/brochure/promo/etc.? Well, for goodness sake just let your kids do it. By the end of the decade — in the best of schools — they will be.

20. HIGH SCHOOL ALGEBRA 1
Within the decade, it will either become the norm to teach this course in middle school or we’ll have finally woken up to the fact that there’s no reason to give algebra weight over statistics and I.T. in high school for non-math majors (and they will have all taken it in middle school anyway).

21. PAPER
In ten years’ time, schools will decrease their paper consumption by no less than 90%. And the printing industry and the copier industry and the paper industry itself will either adjust or perish.
more...
Jennifer Snapp's curator insight, August 1, 2015 1:04 PM

I chose this article because it suggests that educators at every level get on board because the traditional classroom and aspects of teaching will become obsolete in the next 5 to 10 years. It also states that teachers who do not learn to use technology effectively will not have a teaching job in the future.

 

I hope that others will take this serious and understand that using a couple of apps is sufficient when integrating technology. PLN's will take the place of the current PLC's.

Paige Paul's curator insight, September 22, 2015 8:02 PM

Topic 4: Although this is from 2011, it is still relevant.  We are already seeing some of these things happen.  I think it is important in light of our discussions about staff development and growth to know that many of these things will not be a choice-- education IS going to change, and teachers need to be willing and able to adjust.

Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Beware the Google+ Experts | Spin Sucks

Beware the Google+ Experts | Spin Sucks | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Beware the Google+ experts who are trying to sell you a bill of goods while the tool is still in beta and only 24 days old. It's too early to say what it'll do.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

5 Lies Writers Believe About Editors | JeremiahTolbert.com

5 Lies Writers Believe About Editors | JeremiahTolbert.com | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
At least in the sci­ence fic­tion com­mu­nity, there’s a lot of false com­mu­nity wis­dom float­ing around about the edi­to­r­ial process.  Some of them may have been true once.  Some were prob­a­bly invented to mess with the heads of noobs.  ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Why giving standardized tests to young children is ‘really dumb’

Why giving standardized tests to young children is ‘really dumb’ | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Testing young children may be cruel, has not worked out well in the past, often provides unreliable scores and therefore invalid inferences about the abilities of children are made too often, David Berliner writes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

The Apple Tree: 35 Years of Apple Products | iPhone in Canada Blog - Canada's #1 iPhone Resource

The Apple Tree: 35 Years of Apple Products | iPhone in Canada Blog - Canada's #1 iPhone Resource | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Mashable has come up with a neat infographic laying out 35 years of Apple products. Can you spot the items you've owned over the years?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carisa Kluver from ebook experiment
Scoop.it!

Borders' seeks approval to liquidate

NEW YORK — There will be no storybook ending for Borders. The 40-year-old book seller could start liquidating its 399 remaining stores as early as Friday.

Via Shevi Arnold
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

The Changing Face of Children’s Books – New Challenges, New Opportunities | The Digital Media Diet

The Changing Face of Children’s Books – New Challenges, New Opportunities | The Digital Media Diet | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
It’s been less than a year since I began reviewing digital book apps, and the growth has been remarkable. The entry into this market by major publishers also signals that this is a serious transition, not a mere fad. In just the past six months alone, this market has exploded, making it possible to have hundreds of good children’s books in app form.
So what does this revolution mean for books, readers and people who create picture books for children?[/b][/i]
1. Books can be more portable, increasing the opportunities to read.[/b] No need to pack books or anticipate opportunities to read with your child. If you have your iPad/iPhone/iPod with you, those extra minutes waiting in line at the store or for the Dr. can become times when children & parents share a favorite book app.
2. Books can be more than just ‘books’ becoming a transmedia experience that can offer extended learning, extra help for struggling readers and even games or other ‘edutainment’[/b]. This is both a challenge and an opportunity. For the first time, books can take back some of the hours the average child spends in front of the television, offering an experience that children find just as appealing as cartoons on Saturday morning. But it can also turn reading into ‘screen time’ – meaning parents need to be more mindful about not just what kids are reading, but how that reading is happening (if at all).
3. Self-Publishing can become just another kind of publishing, on nearly equal footing with big publishers and well-branded characters.[/b] This brings more opportunities for new authors, illustrators and other independent publishers to create dynamic children’s books for young readers. It also means the market is more diverse, including a wider diversity in quality. This can be a challenge, meaning parents need to screen books for not only appropriateness but also for qualities like proper translation, articulated narration and even the most basic proof-reading and editing.
4. Curation of books has become vital. Ways to discover good picture book apps is still in flux. [/b]Sites like Digital Storytime and other review sites for kids book apps are therefore much more important than they would be for print titles. Book bloggers, reviewers and social media buzz have also become much more important to the success of a kid’s book (app). This is because there is no central clearing house for finding quality digital book apps (beyond the app store). Without even ISBN numbers, catalogues or library databases (or even knowledgeable librarians) to consult, these on-line resources have gotten a big bump in importance. A digital book needs a digital source for discoverability, too, especially when there aren’t prominent spots on bookstore shelves to vie for visibility.
And what will the future bring? [/b][/i]My hope is that ...
more...
Karen's comment, July 19, 2011 2:31 AM
When my dyslexic son chose book apps over games on the iPad, I knew that book apps were right for our family. Your Top 10 Lists have been an invaluable resource for us.Thanks for the work you are doing!
Carisa Kluver's comment, July 19, 2011 12:05 PM
That's wonderful, Karen! Thank you for sharing - you made my day. :)
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Can Borders Closing Help The Self-Publishing Industry? | Brittany C Gates

Borders closing helps #SelfPublishing Authors - what do you think?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Digital Storytime - Reviews of Childrens Picture Book Apps for iPad

Digital Storytime - Reviews of Childrens Picture Book Apps for iPad | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
The Best Source for One-Stop Shopping for Children's iPad Books - Curated eBook Apps for Kids. Detailed, unbiased reviews with YouTube videos and star ratings in a searchable, sortable database. Trusted reviews from a parent and educator.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Digital Storytime Daily Deal Page - Free and Price drops for kids iOS apps

Digital Storytime Daily Deal Page - Free and Price drops for kids iOS apps | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Little Bird’s Internet Security Adventure, is a children’s book produced by AVG for parents to use with their young Pre-School children. The book is designed to help parents initiate conversations about Internet safety in an age-appropriate manner. FREE

"Curated Daily Deals on Kids Books, Games and Educational Apps for iPad, iPhone/iPod. Dozens of FREE kids apps, handpicked daily by a mom, educator and app reviewer. www.Digital-Storytime.com"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Android Tablets Get an iPad-Like "2x" Mode with Android 3.2 - ReadWriteWeb

Android Tablets Get an iPad-Like "2x" Mode with Android 3.2 - ReadWriteWeb | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
CNETAndroid Tablets Get an iPad-Like "2x" Mode with Android 3.2ReadWriteWebEssentially, it's like the iPad's 2x mode, but for Android.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Making the Case for Fee-based Reviews of Self-published Books

Making the Case for Fee-based Reviews of Self-published Books | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, has co-founded BlueInk Review, a pay-to-play platform that reviews self-published books.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

Print Vs. Digital – Is the ebook not a ‘proper’ book? | The Digital Media Diet

Print Vs. Digital – Is the ebook not a ‘proper’ book? | The Digital Media Diet | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
I have been reading articles, blog posts and chatter on Twitter about print books vs. ebooks a lot lately. In the market for children’s books, the rapid cultural shift from print to digital book apps in particular seems to have turned the world on edge. Authors, illustrators, publishers and now developers have a lot to say about this transition. Some seem to think it is a miracle, others fear it is the end of reading as we know it.

I suspect both points of view are right in some ways. From the perspective of cultural change, the fear that ‘reading as we know it’ is over would be accurate, but only because life as we know it is always ending – it always has been and it always will be – that is the nature of the human condition. We do not live in a static cultural environment. It’s an environment that is more akin to a river than a pond. The technological changes in children’s picture books sometimes feel like the cultural equivalent of white water rapids, though. But what parent would send their child downstream alone? As an adult these changes can feel threatening, foreign and even unnecessary. But as a parent, it feels like an imperative to find a good raft that will hold both children and adults safely. Staying on the shore does not feel like an option.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

A Challenge to Doubters: Do Something Impossible | MindShift

A Challenge to Doubters: Do Something Impossible | MindShift | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Make Your Own List. Make Your Own Future.

The article “21 Things That Will be Obsolete in 2020” has elicited a range of responses from readers. One describes a school where much of the predictions are already happening, while others convey serious doubt that any of these will come to fruition — whether it’s due to lack of money or dedication to education, fixation on standardized testing, or just plain jadedness about the possibility for change.

I asked the writer, Shelly Blake-Plock, to respond to the comments. Here’s his thoughtful observation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carisa Kluver
Scoop.it!

A mini-course on network and social network literacy

A mini-course on network and social network literacy | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Networked Publics.Its a 21st Century literacy don't you know =) @drkeevil @PascaleCB – intro @hrheingold back in 2009: http://t.co/GxclhgW...
more...
No comment yet.