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Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids
Interesting news, reviews & trends in children's digital publishing from founder of Digital-Storytime
Curated by Carisa Kluver
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Parenting by iPad; Godsend or iBribery? | ZDNet

Parenting by iPad; Godsend or iBribery? | ZDNet | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

An AP article from October 26, 2011 still has stuck in my head for a while because it raised an issue that I’m sensitive to: parenting by iPad.

 

Raising small kids (in my case, a four and a one year old) in a high-tech household means that it’s only a matter of time before the little one discover the wonders of the iPhone or iPad — then what do you do?

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Technology: More than a tool, a new skill | The Thinking Stick

Technology: More than a tool, a new skill | The Thinking Stick | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

I'm dumping another technology phrase that I think its time has passed by. A few years ago I stopped using the phrase 21st Century blah, blah, blah. You name it we were calling everything 21st Century. I haven't missed that phrase in my vocabulary as I believe it is just the way things should be now that we're 11 years into it. I was thinking about this phrase again the other day as I was talking to seniors...who were born around 1994 and who started their official schooling sometime around 2001. Why are we still using the phrase 21st Century this and that when for our students....it's always been the 21st Century. It just is their world.

 

That brings me to the next phrase that is going to leave my vocabulary. The notion that Technology is just a tool ...

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Publishing lessons from the old music industry’s meltdown

Publishing lessons from the old music industry’s meltdown | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

In 1999 Napster went on the air, and the music industry changed forever. The big record labels were furious, confused, and tried hard to cling to the status quo, but the genie was quite solidly out of the musical bottle.

 

It’s the same anger, confusion, and resistance currently hitting the publishing world, and it’s why the evolution of the music industry is my favorite analogy to help explain to authors what I see hitting the publishing world.

 

There’s at least a dozen big things in common ...

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Read Beyond the Lines: Transmedia has changed the very notion of books and reading — The Digital Shift

Read Beyond the Lines: Transmedia has changed the very notion of books and reading — The Digital Shift | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Whenever I speak to a group of middle school students, I run the same simple test. I ask the audience to think about the day before I arrived. Only that one day. Then I have them count on their fingers each of the following things they did the day before I got there:

 

Used a cell phone
Used a personal device to listen to music (iPod Touch, smartphone, tablet, etc.)
Watched TV
Played a video game
Went online


Then I ask if anyone in the audience can give me a high five ...

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Digital Book Developers Discuss the Changing Tide of Storytelling | PadGadget

Digital Book Developers Discuss the Changing Tide of Storytelling | PadGadget | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Book apps give readers another way to experience narratives, from the simplest book for toddlers to more complex offerings by developers such as Touch Press, which are aimed at an older audience. Recently Sam Berman, CEO at Grids Interactive, a company that produces storybook apps for children including The Truly Great Noodle (4.5 stars, PadGadget) gathered fellow developers together to discuss the future of storytelling ...

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Unplug the kids

In a single generation, as through a massive software upgrade, childhood has been transformed. This upheaval is unprecedented, eclipsing our own evolution and leaving us fumbling for a user's guide: cable TV in the 1970s, video games in the 1980s, Internet in the 1990s, smart phones, social media, ebooks, apps and broadband convergence of all of these in the 2000s.

 

We - and more alarmingly our kids - cannot escape technology anymore, despite fundamental human needs and stages that are not always compatible.

 

Most grownups recall relatively low-tech childhoods: books, backyards, even times when there was literally nothing on TV. Boredom was not considered life-threatening; imagination was a reliable remedy. In the 1960s, the average age kids started watching TV was 2.8 years. It is now 9 months and decreasing.

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Publishing is alive and well | FutureBook

I spent an enjoyable hour over the weekend geeking out over our FutureBook awards entries. If you are excited by what's going on in publishing (which I'm assuming you are if you visit this blog), then I'm happy to report the industry is alive and well.

 

We've had 109 entries across the 6 categories, already up on the first innovation awards from earlier in the year. The variety of entries reflect a fast changing landscape, things have significantly shifted since March even ...

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Why book apps may go to the ball | FutureBook

Why book apps may go to the ball | FutureBook | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Nosy Crow's Cinderella app has just won the iLounge iPad Kids App of the Year. It's a great achievement for a small publisher operating in a new field, and particularly pleasing since it gives me an excuse to talk about an app that I've rudely neglected for two months ...

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Can Children Develop Adequately Without Books? | Jane Friedman

Can Children Develop Adequately Without Books? | Jane Friedman | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
What does the digital media revolution mean for children’s books? For children’s literacy? Are we heading down a slippery slope of oatmeal-minded buffoonery as a culture?
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Lachlan Gadd's curator insight, March 25, 2013 1:40 AM

We must be careful not to rush towards digital media as the savior of 'engaging students in the 21st century'. Both digital literacy and traditional literacy maintain an importance place and space within the classroom and we must be careful not to overlook the importance of traditional literacy in the rush to meet the needs of our students with the latest and the greatest technology.

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Don't Let the Pigeon Run This App! - Digital Storytime's Review

Don't Let the Pigeon Run This App! - Digital Storytime's Review | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

The ever-popular Mo Willems' Pigeon is back and he wants to take over your iPad (or iPhone/iPod)! Based on the series of print books published since 2003, this app is sure to become a favorite in any house with children under 6. It features customizable story sequences that will enchant fans of Willems' work instantly. He had me at 'hello' ...

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Transmedia Storytelling: What Is It?

Transmedia Storytelling: What Is It? | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Transmedia storytelling could be a fictional property, or the method by which that property is marketed, or both, or none of the above.

 

[Another good look at what constitutes transmedia & it comes with Gary Hayes' excellent multi-platform map.]


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Screen Time, Young Kids and Literacy: New Data Begs Questions

Screen Time, Young Kids and Literacy: New Data Begs Questions | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Today's young children, from birth through age 8, are spending an average of two hours and 16 minutes with screen media on a typical day. More than a quarter of their screen time comes from playing on computers, videogame consoles, cell phones and iPad-like tablets. The average age for first-time use of a computer is around 3-and-a-half years old.

 

These are among the results released today from a survey of more than 1300 parents from around the country. The findings are part of Zero to Eight: Children's Media Use in America, a report by Common Sense Media, a non-profit organization that runs a website that reviews movies, games and other media aimed at children. The report follows up on surveys conducted several years ago by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

 

Anyone who has watched YouTube videos of babies playing with iPads will probably be a little unsatisfied by the new statistics. What about e-books for kids? Skype sessions with Grandma? If "edu" apps on iPads qualify as screen time, does it help that Moms and Dads are usually interacting with their children at the same time that their tots are pressing their pudgy fingers against the screens? Today's new data do not go deep enough to answer these questions ...

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Striking It Rich In The App Store: For Developers, It's More Casino Than Gold Mine | Fast Company

Striking It Rich In The App Store: For Developers, It's More Casino Than Gold Mine | Fast Company | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

For every developer making millions in Apple's app store, there are thousands who've had their dreams smashed into a million little pixels. What makes the App Store so popular with developers--and how can you succeed? One developer's tale of hitting the Apple jackpot.

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Why Picture Books Are Important by Elizabeth O. Dulemba

Why Picture Books Are Important by Elizabeth O. Dulemba | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Why Picture Books Are Important People need three things to survive – food, shelter, and wonder. That third need has been met for thousands of years through stories both as entertainment or as ways to share our history and culture.
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The Digital Dilemma for Picture Book Publishers

Top quality apps are expensive and direct-to-ebook conversions lack punch, so what's a picture book publisher who wants to go digital to do?
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The Dirty Little Secret About App Review Sites | The Digital Media Diet

The Dirty Little Secret About App Review Sites | The Digital Media Diet | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

I began my life with apps as a bystander in the app development process as my husband created his first Android and then iOS apps. But soon I was drawn into the process, helping with ideas, marketing and more. Then I began my own review site, as I realized how important (and influential) the reviewer could be in the whole world ‘o apps. This post represents some of my own discoveries about app reviewing, reviewers and review sites now that my own site, Digital-Storytime.com, is approaching its one year birthday.

 

I have learned a lot about review sites by being on ‘the other side’ of review requests. Initially, as part of an app development team, I found review sites to be a bit mysterious. The more professional the site looked (and the more popular it seemed) the more I thought they were either making money doing reviews or run by a big organization. It seemed like giving a free copy of our app in exchange for a review was a reasonable offer – we worked hard on the app, so why wouldn’t they work hard on their review? But it’s just not that simple. Here are a few things I’ve learned about the world of app reviewing ...

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I Education Apps Review - I Education Apps Review - StoryBuddy

I Education Apps Review - I Education Apps Review - StoryBuddy | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

StoryBuddy is an app that allows children to create their own picture books. The pages can be filled of students’ own drawings or digital photos. StoryBuddy is an excellent app to help younger children develop their fine motor skills. Students will like being able to flip through their book and watch the pages turn like a real book. Children have control over every step of the book-making process including the cover page ...

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All a Twitter About Apps — The Digital Shift

All a Twitter About Apps — The Digital Shift | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

What do users want to see in kids’ book apps? More offerings for young adult and middle grade readers and better functionality—like being able to control the narration speed or kill the music. These are just a couple of ideas tossed about during Wednesday’s Twitter “party” hosted by Ruckus Media.


The latest installment in a monthly chat series held on Twitter, the hour-long session held October 19 addressed “Librarians and Digital Storytelling.”

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Guest Post: Behold the Corona Comics SDK! | Ansca Mobile Blog | » Archive

Guest Post: Behold the Corona Comics SDK! | Ansca Mobile Blog | » Archive | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

About six months ago, David Fox of Electric Eggplant created the Be Confident iPad comic book to widespread acclaim. Naturally, we also named it our App of the Week!

 

Now, David has taken lead on the Corona Comic SDK for those of you specifically looking to get into the iComic space! Be sure to check out Be Confident on iPad, and read about David’s experience …

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ISBNs & E-books: The Ongoing Dilemma

ISBNs & E-books: The Ongoing Dilemma | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Should publishers assign a unique ISBN for each e-book format of each title they publish, and what are the implications either way? There is no consensus of what is the best practice, but one thing is clear: you need to make the decision yourself and not leave it up to someone else.

 

As more people venture into the e-book world, they inevitably come across a question they need to answer: Should I assign an ISBN to my e-book? But before we answer this first question, let’s look at why it’s important to designate a new ISBN for an e-book in the first place ...

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Make Way for Stories: There’s a good reason why people are passing up picture books

Make Way for Stories: There’s a good reason why people are passing up picture books | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Last October the New York Times featured an article by Julie Bosman, “Picture Books No Longer a Staple for Children,” which outlined the fate of most new picture books: they tend to “die a sad little death” on booksellers’ shelves as more parents abandon them and push their preschoolers to read chapter books.

 

As someone tackling publishing issues from the outside, Bosman missed the mark a few times, sometimes misrepresenting those she interviewed. Not surprisingly, industry insiders responded in droves, writing articles and sending emails, defending the picture book and its important place in children’s reading development. The most charming response arrived on April 13, 2011, when the Times received a scroll created by students from Birch Lane Elementary School, in Davis, CA, proclaiming their love of picture books: 60 kids devoted an entire month to the form and read 4,590 of them!

 

I must admit, I’ve grown quite weary over the last few years of the all-too-predictable response from adults who champion children’s and teen books: attack anyone who makes critical comments about them. They tend to “kill the messenger”—rather than looking at the mess. All too often the writer of a critical piece is labeled a charlatan, even if what is said is basically true.

 

The basic premise of the New York Times article—that new picture books are increasingly ignored in today’s marketplace—seems completely sound to me ...

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Picture Book Month

Picture Book Month | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Think * Smile * Read!

 

Picture Book Month is an international initiative to designate November as Picture Book Month, encouraging everyone to celebrate literacy with picture books.

 

Every day in November, there will be a new post from a picture book champion explaining why he/she thinks picture books are important.

 

We are doing this because in this digital age where people are predicting the coming death of print books, picture books (the print kind) need love. And the world needs picture books. There’s nothing like the physical page turn of a beautifully crafted picture book.

 

Join the celebration and party with a picture book!

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Pottermore and Beyond: New Digital Opportunities for Authors and Publishers

Pottermore and Beyond: New Digital Opportunities for Authors and Publishers | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

When the first Amazon Kindle was released in 2007, the publishing industry held its breath. Would a digital eReader be the print book's kryptonite just as the web had been for newspapers and magazines? Four years later, most of us still peruse the florescent-lit aisles of Barnes and Nobles on occasion; we even stop by the local library to check out the latest best seller, but with the many digital options currently available for readers to consume content, print media might soon become the last place we look to meet our needs.

 

Don't panic. This change isn't necessarily a bad thing. Social media, tablets, and eReaders have not only changed the publishing model, they have given authors and publishers a whole new avenue to engage readers beyond printed books. Now, with the launch of interactive websites that accompany these books, such as J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter experience, Pottermore, and the continued growth and acceptance of mobile apps, the list of digital possibilities is getting longer.

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A child's eye for enchantment

A child's eye for enchantment | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

"How long artists will be the main force in children's book illustration is an interesting question,'' Gervay says. ''It is definitely moving into digital - illustrators such as Wayne Harris, Gus Gordon, Sarah Davis are producing astonishing work. However, will it be as beautiful as Anna Pignarato's warm and loving paintings?''


More illustrators are experimenting with digital illustrations and some are achieving surprising results, with unlimited palettes and styles ...

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