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Do Screens Belong in Library Storytimes for Young Children? Response to ALSC Blog | The Digital Media Diet

Do Screens Belong in Library Storytimes for Young Children? Response to ALSC Blog | The Digital Media Diet | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

A few days ago, a guest post in the ALSC Blog about how “The Screen Free Storytime is the Best Storytime” really got me ‘all riled up’. The post is from Kathy Kleckner, a children’s librarian for Dakota County Libraries at their Rosemount branch. She has worked as a librarian on a bookmobile,  in elementary schools and in urban systems.  She is a member of the Minnesota Library Association and ALSC. 

I posted a very long response in the comments to this post, which is reproduced here.

 

It represents two diverging opinions that exist within the library community … but also represents a wider discourse happening in the world of professionals who work with children. Should we be promoting book apps, ebooks and other digital content as legitimate reading for children, or are print books ‘superior’ in some way?

Carisa Kluver's insight:

My comments were spontaneous ... do you think I was off-base or overly harsh?

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Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids
Interesting news, reviews & trends in children's digital publishing from founder of Digital-Storytime
Curated by Carisa Kluver
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AppRot – What it is and why it matters to everyone in the app economy … | The Digital Media Diet

AppRot – What it is and why it matters to everyone in the app economy … | The Digital Media Diet | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Recently, developer Marco Arment, a programmer, writer, podcaster, geek, and coffee enthusiast, wrote on his blog about something he called “AppRot”. Over time, apps that are released into the iOS AppStore for iPhones, iPads and iPods can become unsupported by the original content creator (whether the app is from an independent developer, author or established publisher). This makes apps and other eBook content seem more ‘disposable’ and impermanent than other publishing formats, creating confusion and frustration among consumers who are already nervous about the digital shift. When app developers complain about the tiny margins they are making on digital publications, they are up against not only the lack of a physical product but the very real chance that most experienced consumers of digital books have had a least one bad experience with AppRot. 

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The future is written. And illustrated too.

The future is written. And illustrated too. | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Before Guttenberg came along and created his moveable type, the line between written and illustrated was much fuzzier. European monks of the 13th and 14th centuries created elaborate Bibles with serpentine drop caps intertwining with often-phantasmagorical biblical scenes. Marginalia abounded. Books were beautiful inside and out. Given most of the population was illiterate and their access to these books—in an age before mechanical reproduction—would have been limited, illustrated storytelling was critically important. And this was illustrated storytelling par excellence. These monks—and their patrons—knew that to put forth a really killer story, you had to both tell and show. Going back even further—to the caves of Lascaux, for instance—and storytelling was exclusively of the illustrated variety.

 

Serious literature has largely eschewed the image, relegating “picture books” to the stuff you find in the kids section or comic book store. Read more ...

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Storia Moves to Streaming Model

Storia Moves to Streaming Model | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
With the September release of Storia School Edition, Scholastic will move its digital reading platform to a streaming service.
Carisa Kluver's insight:

What are the implications for the digital divide if top choices like @Scholastic require wifi to read? Are low-income households ready?

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Jeni Mawter's curator insight, August 10, 11:23 PM

Thanks for sharing this Carisa Kluver. What will be the impact of needing wifi to read Scholastic publications for children and young adult readers?

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Best apps for schools: what do teachers want? - CMF Research Blog

Best apps for schools: what do teachers want? - CMF Research Blog | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
As part of our ongoing work to develop criteria for assessing the quality of children’s digital books and apps, we ran a number of workshops with teachers in local schools and asked them about what they think a good digital book or app should look like and contain. Some of these teachers had never used iPads …
Carisa Kluver's insight:

Excellent list of teacher requests for app developers to consider ...

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Note to the #DigitalShift: The Librarians Have Arrived! | The Digital Media Diet

Note to the #DigitalShift: The Librarians Have Arrived! | The Digital Media Diet | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Over the past two years I’ve been working closely within the library community about digital content for children. I’ve attended conferences, participated in the brilliant @LittleeLit think tank and even co-created training modules to pilot for professional development in multiple states.

But until this past month, after attending the exceptional American Library Association (ALA) 2014 annual conference in Las Vegas, I worried that librarians would not catch up in time. I feared that the digital shift towards apps, tablets, gamification, transmedia storytelling and new media formats was simply moving too fast. For the first few years after the iPad arrived, it seemed possible that the library community may have gotten on board a little too late to be at the front of this crazy digital train. Boy, was I wrong!

 

- See more at: http://digitalmediadiet.com/?p=3205#sthash.XvPw6tUd.dpuf

Carisa Kluver's insight:

My post about my recent trip to ALA!

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Interested in Apps, iPads, eBooks and Other New Media with Young Kids?

Interested in Apps, iPads, eBooks and Other New Media with Young Kids? | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

If yes, we would love it if you would join the conversation. We have a Google group that serves as the LittleeLit Think Tank (it functions like a listserv so you can interact with it via email, but also an online collaboration tool) where participants post new research, app suggestions, ask logistics questions, or share cool new things they’re tried in their libraries.


We’d love to have you join the conversation! You don’t need to be an expert, and you can even lurk for a bit before sharing or asking anything. We are entirely crowd-sourced and grass-roots, and we believe that everyone has something to share on this topic. Please join us! We want to hear what you’re up to, and if you have a question, there are lots of folks who might be able to answer it.

Carisa Kluver's insight:

Cen Campbell [@LittleeLit] and I are working on building this community into a non-profit think tank for librarians, educators and families with young children ... join the conversation!

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Born Reading: An Interview with Jason Boog — @fuseeight A Fuse #8 Production

Born Reading: An Interview with Jason Boog — @fuseeight A Fuse #8 Production | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

At the end of June The New York Times released the following story: Pediatrics Group to Recommend Reading Aloud to Children From Birth.  For those of us in the literacy-minded community, this comes as no surprise.  But what about those parents for whom reading aloud poses a challenge?  Born Reading: Bringing Up Bookworms in a Digital Age is a delightful aid to any new parent, with (as the official description says) “step-by-step instructions on interactive reading and advice for developing your child’s interest in books from the time they are born.”

 

So I figured, why not interview the author himself?  If only to give you just a taste of what the book has in store.  Because you know me.  I don’t write introductions for no junk.  Jason kind submitting to my grilling ...

Carisa Kluver's insight:

Great new book (I'm reading ARC now), out July 15th!

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faith ward's curator insight, July 13, 10:19 AM

This book looks very interesting but this quote from the interview does give me pause! I will place this on our September book order:


"Through this research, I discovered the art of “interactive reading” or “dialogic reading.” Child development experts crafted these reading techniques 25 years ago. These simple and easy reading tricks will literally make your child smarter."

Gail Hutton's comment, July 15, 5:06 AM
Looks interesting Faith! Thank you for ordering! You may want to check this out on IQ http://www.born-reading.com/about_born_reading/
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Self-Publishing Offers Hope for Diverse Authors Shut Out by Traditional Publishers | Mediashift | PBS

Self-Publishing Offers Hope for Diverse Authors Shut Out by Traditional Publishers | Mediashift | PBS | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
I don t know when or why I started doing it, but every time I go to a conference I almost always do a minority report and grade the diversity of the attendants that the conference brings in my head.
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Joan Ganz Cooney Center - We Stink at Playing with Our Kids: Thinking Differently About Playing Together

Joan Ganz Cooney Center - We Stink at Playing with Our Kids: Thinking Differently About Playing Together | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

Co-play is tricky business. A couple of years ago Emil Ovemar, Executive Producer and Co-founder ofToca Boca, the company that I work for, asked me to come up with a digital toy concept that would encourage children and parents to play together. The next day, I suggested an app based around the idea of a bike shop. The children would assemble the bikes and the adults would manage the business of the shop, pricing the bikes and selling them to virtual customers. Imagine: a giraffe comes in and needs a tall race bike. The parent says: “Hey kid! Do we have that? No? Can you build it? I’ll tell the giraffe to wait.” Next, a hippo comes in and needs a sturdy beach bike… I thought it was a good concept— the kids get to be creative and the adults handle the books. The app didn’t get made, though, and we never came up with another concept for co-play.

 

Eventually, we abandoned the idea of designing specifically for child-parent play altogether, and I’m happy about that. Here’s why: many parents, myself included, stink at playing with their children.

 

Why? Let me give you three reasons ...

Carisa Kluver's insight:

Excellent piece from Toca Boca, developer of many popular, open-ended play-based apps for young children ...

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T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play

Carisa Kluver's insight:

Excellent .PDF resource (over 50 pages) about Transmedia & Learning

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Doug Crowe's curator insight, July 7, 8:58 AM

Neuroplasticity, transmedia, blah, blah…while all of these buzz words are true, harnessing the psychology of humans is easy when distilled down its roots.

People are curious. Especially when our curiosities are focused on our interests. Engage your community with questions they've already been asking or thinking and you'll win. 

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Digital Discoverability: The Importance of Reviews

Digital Discoverability: The Importance of Reviews | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
I need your opinion. But first let me tell you why…Ensuring that your
digital publication—whether StoryApp, interactive eBook, or print-on-demand
product—is discovered and read by customers continues to be one of the
greatest challenges facing authors and publishers in the digital space
today.
* Online distribution channels are “noisy” places. They are flooded
with content, not all of it good. (Some might even say most of it.)
 
* Online distribution channels are not well organized, especially the
App Store, making it difficult for publishers, both big and small, to
successfully “shelve” their digital offerings for easy discovery. (In
fact, it remains quite mysterious how to best choose your
categories.)
 
* Online distribution channels can be daunting for the consumer, many
of whom never dig deeper than what is “fed” to them by way of top
picks, editor's choices, and other recommendations.
For the producer, the mere act of being on the App or iBookstores, Google
Play, or on Amazon does not mean your job is done. Far from it. You now
need social proof that your content is worth someone’s attention. This
involves marketing. Lots of it. Ongoingly. And for the long haul.I can
state from experience, that digital publishing, while seemingly the
opportunity of our age, is not for the faint of heart.Because the name of
the game—the way to get highlighted by Apple or Amazon, for example—is
through downloads, lots of them, as well as high ratings and positive
reviews. The more you get, the more likely you are to hit that magical
tipping point where the system works for you, so you get even more. Only
then does quality content rise above and get noticed in the
crowd.Developers with big marketing budgets know this. That’s why they
allocate resources in an attempt to trip the system: giving their product
away in order to boost downloads and/or paying for reviews are just two
examples. These practices prove my point: To survive in the digital
ecosystem, you need ratings and reviews. Reviews, especially good ones, are
a kind of social currency. If I give your book a positive review, someone
else is more likely to take your book seriously, purchase it, and also post
a glowing review.Even a bad review, if well-founded, can be turned into a
positive if you use it to update and improve your book or product.True, not
all good reviews guarantee quality content. Some are just plain fake. But
the power of a positive review cannot be overstated.It’s exactly this type
of community engagement that has driven such powerful social engines as
TripAdvisor.So, on behalf of all content creators out there, when you buy
your next favorite book or app, the one you think deserves mention, please
take a moment to go back to the store where you bought it and send up a
starred review.It takes many years, a lot of faith, and valuable resources
of both time and money to write a great book or to produce a winning app.
Yet, it takes mere minutes to let an author or developer know how much you
appreciate their efforts.* * * Consider adding
Beware Madame la Guillotine
to your reading list this summer. Request your FREE pdf download
in exchange for an honest review directly on Amazon. I will be forever
grateful.
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Building a Diverse Digital Library | Born Reading

Building a Diverse Digital Library | Born Reading | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

How diverse is your child’s library? How diverse are the apps on your digital devices? I’ve collected some resources to help parents and caregivers build diverse digital libraries.

At the American Library Association’s annual conference, the “Promoting Cultural Competence in Digital Storytimes” session explored apps that parents can use to build a more diverse digital library. I’ve embedded the slides from that presentation below…

Carisa Kluver's insight:

Excellent resource site & great book!

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Technologies for Acquiring and Making Literacy

Technologies for Acquiring and Making Literacy | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

In 2013, Nelleke Belo, Susan McKenney, and Joke Voogt conducted a review to further understand research outcomes in the use of technology for early literacy acquisition in the kindergarten classroom. Drawing on four academic literature databases, the research team narrowed 13,070 initial hits to 46 articles that met their selection criteria. These articles, explicitly focused on technology as an independent variable, were aimed at kindergarten-age students, included early literacy development, and were published after 2001. Drawing on previous research affordances as well as gaps in the literature, the authors asked:

Carisa Kluver's insight:

Great review of research literature, concluding that:  "technologies have affordances and constraints making them more or less useful in different circumstances. The review provided evidence that electronic storybooks can lead to significant early literacy gains. However, there were also other technologies highlighted in this review that were successful in literacy acquisition. More importantly, electronic storybooks impacted literacy skills differently based on the interactivity they afforded and the number of student interactions offered."

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Seven Lessons Learned About ELA Apps, courtesy of Common Sense Media

Seven Lessons Learned About ELA Apps, courtesy of Common Sense Media | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Yesterday, I attended an Appy Hour held by Common Sense Media. The goal of the event was to inform teachers about technology in ELA, focusing on tablets, and give a few tips on how to incorporate i...
Carisa Kluver's insight:

1. Ed-tech Monetization Harms Teachers

 

2. Ed-tech platforms are beautiful, intuitive and (mostly) empty

 

3. Kids Love to Create

 

4. The entire teaching process is now in focus

 

5. Technology access is increasing, fast

 

6. Teachers can’t connect and collaborate digitally

 

7. Graphite is an exciting but early platform

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This Librarian Is Not Impressed With Your Digital, No-Books Library – Next City

This Librarian Is Not Impressed With Your Digital, No-Books Library – Next City | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it

IntDigital evangelism has lulled us into an “embarrassingly anti-intellectual comfort zone,” argues a Philadelphia librarian.

Carisa Kluver's insight:

Interesting ideas to chew on ...

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Do We Need Consumer Protection for (Kids) eBooks?

Do We Need Consumer Protection for (Kids) eBooks? | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
There is no true path of ownership when you purchase eBooks, digital comics or manga from online retailers. Instead, you are merely granted a license and if
Carisa Kluver's insight:

Great summary from Good- eReader - format confusion & restrictions is a major issue for everyone who reads.

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Common Core: In Real Libraries 2014 - SlideShare from MaryAnn Scheuer

Common Core IRL: In Real Libraries -- presentation to the American Library Association Annual Conference 2014. Libraries can play an essential role in helping …
Carisa Kluver's insight:

Exceptional slideshare from school librarian and book blogger - great resource about role of common core in library collections.

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Early Reading Apps for Kids - GalleyCat

Early Reading Apps for Kids - GalleyCat | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Early Reading Apps for Kids
At the American Library Association conference in Las Vegas last weekend, librarians from around the country showed how apps and digital media can encourage literacy–dispelling fears that digital media will destroy our love of reading.
Carisa Kluver's insight:
Great list from Jason Boog!
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It's time more parents started paying for children's apps

It's time more parents started paying for children's apps | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
As the FTC sues Amazon for unauthorised in-app purchases, parents can support responsible developers of kids' apps. By Stuart Dredge
Carisa Kluver's insight:

Excellent points about the ecosystem for children's educational apps and the potential influence parents can have by valuing paid content.

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Five Things You Didn’t Know About Book Apps | Digital Book World

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Book Apps | Digital Book World | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Planning for the future of book apps, two cutting-edge production workflows, analyzing Harlequin's experience, UK kids sticking with print books and more.
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The Effectiveness of Free eBooks is Declining: Smashwords - GalleyCat

The Effectiveness of Free eBooks is Declining: Smashwords - GalleyCat | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
The Effectiveness of Free eBooks is Declining: Smashwords

 

Offering up a free copy of your eBook has been a good way for self-published and first-time authors to promote their books to new readers. However, according to a new report from self-publishing site Smashwords, that tool may soon be played out.

Carisa Kluver's insight:

Interesting data!

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Will digital eat the children's media world? 'It's totally going to happen!'

Will digital eat the children's media world? 'It's totally going to happen!' | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
But that doesn't necessarily mean printed books and linear television will die out by 2020, suggest experts. By Stuart Dredge
Carisa Kluver's insight:

Excellent read!

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YouTube, apps and Minecraft: digital kids and the future of children’s media

YouTube, apps and Minecraft: digital kids and the future of children’s media | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
SuperAwesome boss Dylan Collins challenges entertainment companies and investors to adapt to change. By Stuart Dredge
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Evolution In Storytelling: How Disney Publishing is Shaking Up Digital Books For Kids | Digital Book World

Evolution In Storytelling: How Disney Publishing is Shaking Up Digital Books For Kids | Digital Book World | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Disney Publishing is breaking down the barriers between games, books, and movies with their line of digital apps for kids.
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Children's Nonfiction Rising

Children's Nonfiction Rising | Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids | Scoop.it
Why read nonfiction? The utilitarian reasons are the ones cited most. We read to understand the fine print of contracts, how to operate the new-fangled gadget we just overpaid for, to make sure we don't get the side effects of a new medication....
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Terry Doherty's curator insight, July 2, 9:20 AM

Funny how we often think of nonfiction in terms of books and the past ... current events are a daily, ready-made resource. Loved this: "If you want to learn something new, get a book on the subject at your local library's children's room. You just might learn something new and be entertained in the bargain."