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CHRISTO with Jarrett Earnest - The Brooklyn Rail

CHRISTO with Jarrett Earnest - The Brooklyn Rail | PublicArt | Scoop.it

Rail: You said “The Gates” are a site-specific work, but what the films show is that the art is everything you did from 1979 to 2005, in terms of getting permission and developing relationships: that is the art too?

Christo: Exactly. Of course people see the end product as the work of art, and that is what many don’t understand. They think we are just masochists to go through all that. After “The Gates” we had a pile of cities asking us to take them to their parks. All our projects are unique images. We will never transfer them to another place and it would bore us to do that, because by then we already know how to do it. Trying to figure out how to do it is the exciting thing of the project.

Rail: Because you have approached every step of engaging both institutions and private citizens to participate, it seems like your work prefigures a lot of what later artists called “social practice.”

Christo: Our projects are not done for the sake of that—that would be theater. I come from a communist country, Marxist educated, and I cannot stand propaganda art. Our project is one of enjoying beauty. We get involved into the ecological, political situations we do because they are already there, and have to be worked with to make the project. In the world, everything is owned by somebody. If it is ranchers, then we talked to ranchers. The Reichstag is owned by 80 million Germans, and there is no way we can talk to them all. But they elected 660 deputies of the German parliament to represent them, so we had to convince the majority of them to support the project. The principle person was the prime minister who was a very powerful conservative leader, and he was so much against the project that he moved the discussion of the wrapping of the Reichstag from a simple vote to a full debate and roll-call vote for the German Parliament that took two hours. The vote was scheduled to be in 1994 and Jeanne-Claude and I had hundreds of meetings with people. The principle speech against it was so violently negative that many conservatives changed their mind and ended up voting for the wrapping of the Reichstag, and it happened. The man who made that speech is a very important man in the European Union, the current finance minister of Germany, Wolfgang Schäuble. Recently a newspaper asked him if he had any regrets and he said “yes”—that he was against our wrapping of the Reichstag.

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US president Obama visit Stockholm, Sweden – Artists covered the city’s statues with orange

US president Obama visit Stockholm, Sweden – Artists covered the city’s statues with orange | PublicArt | Scoop.it
We declare the world as our canvas

US president Barack Obama visit Stockholm, Sweden today and some artists and activists covered the city’s statues heads with orange. – a clear link to Guantánamo.


Via Kuniko
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James Boss's comment, September 12, 2013 7:57 AM
Nice..
Sarah's tut's curator insight, September 17, 2013 8:35 AM

The Statues at the city of Stockholm in Sweden were covered in orange material. This report is quite interesting because, it reminds me of another site-specific artwork by Jeanne Claudes and Christos(The gates) in America. And I think that is ephemeral art, ofcourse there will be something annoying about the oranges fabrics if they stay there forever-Thabiso Mafana

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Saltz: The Walter De Maria Work That Recalled My Past and Made My Future

Saltz: The Walter De Maria Work That Recalled My Past and Made My Future | PublicArt | Scoop.it
An homage to the late artist and his inspirational New York Earth Room.
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

I recall seeing the Earth Room twice in N.Y. --thought it was fascinating but not allowed to get in and limited to just seeing it from one point of view was an issue. I also remember that one of my Friends ( an art Publisher) had his office under the installation... I think they had to water the dirt often.

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Outside the Citadel, Social Practice Art Is Intended to Nurture

Outside the Citadel, Social Practice Art Is Intended to Nurture | PublicArt | Scoop.it
Social practice artists blur the lines among object making, performance and activism, creating participatory work that often flourishes beyond galleries and museums.

 

If none of these projects sound much like art — or the art you are used to seeing in museums — that is precisely the point. As the commercial art world in America rides a boom unlike any it has ever experienced, another kind of art world growing rapidly in its shadows is beginning to assert itself. And art institutions around the country are grappling with how to bring it within museum walls and make the case that it can be appreciated along with paintings, sculpture and other more tangible works.

Known primarily as social practice, its practitioners freely blur the lines among object making, performance, political activism, community organizing, environmentalism and investigative journalism, creating a deeply participatory art that often flourishes outside the gallery and museum system. And in so doing, they push an old question — “Why is it art?” — as close to the breaking point as contemporary art ever has.

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Cornell Receives $1.4 Million Grant To Launch Seminars on Urbanism - Cornell University The Cornell Daily Sun

Cornell Receives $1.4 Million Grant To Launch Seminars on Urbanism Cornell University The Cornell Daily Sun The second seminar series, called Expanded Practice Seminars, will bring humanities students into design and architecture studios to...

 

For example, Kenney noted that students will be able to view visual art and listen to hip-hop recordings that played an essential role in rebuilding the Bronx community, which was damaged by the construction of the Bronx Freeway in the 1960s.


Via Jules Rochielle
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

You need to understand the past to built a better futur.

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Rennes, veilleurs de l’éveil, watchmen awakening

Rennes, veilleurs de l’éveil, watchmen awakening | PublicArt | Scoop.it

 

English translation below

Voir, du haut d’un immeuble, le soleil se lever ou se coucher : le projet de la chorégraphe Joanne Leighton invite 729 personnes à ouvrir leur regard sur cet instant cosmique. Notre reporter, 165e inscrit, a pris son tour de garde.

Chaque matin, aux alentours du lever du soleil, une personne veille sur Rennes pendant une heure. Une autre fait de même le soir, pendant la dernière heure du jour. Ce rite a commencé le 30 septembre, et s’achèvera le 29 septembre 2013. Ainsi, pendant un an, installées dans un petit abri en bois perché en haut d’un immeuble de bureaux, 729 personnes vont se relayer à l’aurore et au crépuscule pour guetter. Guetter quoi, guetter qui ? L’histoire ne le dit pas. La chorégraphe Joanne Leighton, qui organise le projet dans le cadre du festival les Tombées de la nuit, l’a simplement défini en ces termes : «Etre présent, être acteur / observateur, questionner l’espace, ouvrir son regard à perte de vue, éprouver la rencontre entre notre corps et le paysage.

 

Google translation:

View from the top of a building, the sunrise or sunset: the choreographer Joanne Leighton invites 729 people to open their eyes on this cosmic moment. Our reporter, 165th part, took his watch.

Every morning, around sunrise, a person watches over Rennes for an hour. Another did the same in the evening, during the last hour of the day. This ritual began September 30 and will end September 29, 2013. Thus, for a year, settled in a small wooden hut perched on an office building, 729 people will take turns at dawn and dusk to watch. Watch this, watch that? The story does not say. Choreographer Joanne Leighton, who organized the project as part of the festival the night Fallen, simply defined as follows: "Being present, being an actor / observer, questioning space, open his eyes out there, experience the encounter between our body and the landscape. "

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Participation and Political Space

Participation and Political Space | PublicArt | Scoop.it

 

Community Engagment

Art galleries want to capture audiences and involve them in contemporary art discourse. They do this through public engagement programmes by offering a series of talks, performances or practical sessions that explore the current exhibition.

The Arts Council Wales released the Coming of Age annual report which stated that the Arts Council would have increased levels in attendance and participation in the arts in Wales by 3% by the end of this year. What’s interesting here is not the percentage, but how the galleries go about the task.

Artes Mundi is an exhibition currently on at the National Museum Cardiff. Artist Tania Bruguera uses art in order to address the politics of daily life. First performed at Tate Modern in London, Tatlin’s Whisper #5 (2008), is one of the unannounced events included by the artist as part of her entry to the exhibition. In this performance, Bruguera attempts to reach out to audiences by inviting them to participate in the performance. Therefore the artist does not represent politics, but political situations, as she told Kathy Noble in an interview for Frieze magazine in January 2012.

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Here’s a whole new definition of the phrase “Tree House.”

Here’s a whole new definition of the phrase “Tree House.” | PublicArt | Scoop.it

Here’s a whole new definition of the phrase “Tree House.”

Visiondivision‘s concession stand for 100 Acres, an Art & Nature Park in Indiana, is made entirely from one 100-ft yellow poplar tree. Not only does the trunk form the horizontal beam of the structure, but literally nothing of the tree was left to waste: bark became shingles; extracted pieces of wood became structural support, chairs and tables, swings; even the bark’s syrup was extracted to be sold in the kiosk itself.

The architects who refined this tree into a building were inspired by an ethos of “gentleness” with nature. As they share in their architects’ brief: “Our project is about trying to harvest something as gently as possible so that the source of what we harvest is displayed in a pure, pedagogic and respectful way—respectful to both the source itself and to everyone visiting the building.”

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Softening Modernism's Hard Edge: contemporary landscape interventions

Softening Modernism's Hard Edge: contemporary landscape interventions | PublicArt | Scoop.it

Contemporary landscape interventions are transforming midcentury buildings and plazas to address their urbanistic failings.

Inserting a work of contemporary landscape architecture into the context of a mid-century modernist complex is a challenging proposition. Many of the most prominent plazas, pocket parks, and courtyards from the modernist era feature stark, austere designs, intended to complement the buildings they served.

Some renowned modernist spaces such as the plaza in front of Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building were not designed with the intention that people would linger. “When Mies van der Rohe saw people sitting on the ledges, he was surprised,” Phillip Johnson is said to have commented. “He never dreamed they would.”

Certainly the sensibility of the typical mid-century modernist urban landscape is at odds with contemporary tastes and activities. Now, urban open spaces are designed for populated plazas, with a variety of seating options, shade trees and open space...

Indeed, many public plazas from the modernist era have been redesigned to conform to the contemporary program.

 

Read the full article for more in-depth case studies, preservation inititives, and issues related to preserving modernist architecture- in balance with the needs of today's urban spaces.


Via Lauren Moss
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Banksy Watch: Midtown Gets Pissed On

Banksy Watch: Midtown Gets Pissed On | PublicArt | Scoop.it

Street art photographer Luna Park spotted this new Banksy a day before it was officially announced on Banksy’s website. When she published it a number of us were debating whether it was a Banksy or not. His style has become so commonplace in the street art community that the original and the imitators are getting harder to distinguish.

So, the monthlong Banksy street show in NYC continues. RJ, of Vandalog, asked me yesterday what I thought of the Banksy spectacle, and I offered my off-hand comment that it might be a retrospective of sorts. It has always surprised me why more street artists don’t conceptualize a “show” on the street.

Philippe Lejeune's insight:

"This world is but a canvas to our imagination". Henry David Thoreau

to reflect upon our condition!

The Grafittis were or are "vandalism" today an artform (more) respected and promoted (consumed) is also becoming conceptual --intellectualized for our reflection with artist like Banksy.  You can do something bad... it will still be something for my "good senses"... 

 

 



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Friday Links: The Impact of Public Art, a New Model for Food Distribution, and More - Guggenheim Blogs

Friday Links: The Impact of Public Art, a New Model for Food Distribution, and More - Guggenheim Blogs | PublicArt | Scoop.it
The film Art in the City reveals that Chicago’s vast collection of public art has played a defining role in creating the city’s identity.
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

Someone listening? out there in Boston or Providence.  

Public sculpture is a problem. For far too long there's been a loss of purpose. The question I'am trying to address is about space. I am trying to address the nature of lack of interaction with the public. What is the object doing out there? In a way, it's also a kind of hole in the space -a non object. It's an attempt to make the physical non-physical. The modern sublime is one that includes the viewer.   

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Town Square Initiative: New York - Urban Planning and Design - Gensler

Town Square Initiative: New York - Urban Planning and Design - Gensler | PublicArt | Scoop.it

The Town Square Initiative is a yearlong volunteer effort in which Gensler designers set out to unearth and re-imagine unexpected open space in cities around the globe. All 43 Gensler offices were invited to participate in the conceptual project, in which we challenged our designers to identify open space in the city and reimagine it as a town square.

Gensler New York’s design of their future city

 
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All Placemaking is Creative: How a Shared Focus on Place Builds Vibrant Destinations

All Placemaking is Creative: How a Shared Focus on Place Builds Vibrant Destinations | PublicArt | Scoop.it

Placemaking is a process, accessible to anyone, that allows peoples’ creativity to emerge. When open and inclusive, this process can be extraordinarily effective in making people feel attached to the places where they live. That makes people more likely to get involved and build shared wealth in their communities.

 

“Placemaking, applied correctly, can show us new ways to help cultures emerge where openness is not so scary,” notes Dr. Katherine Loflin, the lead project consultant for the Knight Foundation’s groundbreaking study, which showed a significant correlation between community attachment and economic growth. “We could find with consistency over time that it was the softer side of place—social offerings, openness, and aesthetics—that really seem to drive peoples’ attachment to their place. It wasn’t necessarily basic services: how well potholes got paved over. It wasn’t even necessarily for peoples’ personal economic circumstances.”

The study’s other key finding was that there is an empirical relationship between higher levels of attachment and cities’ GDP growth.

Placemaking, in other words, is a vital part of economic development. And yet, there has long been criticism that calls into question whether or not this process is actually helping communities to develop their local economies, or merely accelerating the process of gentrification in formerly-maligned urban core neighborhoods. We believe that this is largely due to confusion over what Placemaking is, and who “gets” to be involved. If Placemaking is project-led, development-led, design-led or artist-led, then it does likely lead to gentrification and a more limited set of community outcomes.

 

Read the complete article for more on the process of placemaking and the roles community members play in creating vibrant spaces...


Via Lauren Moss
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Katharine Norman's curator insight, March 15, 2013 3:16 AM

Positive aspects from being connected to your community.

 

Jennifer Stencel's curator insight, July 3, 2015 12:47 PM

Libraries are an important fixture to create PLACE in their community. But are we doing it?

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Ann Hamilton at the Park Avenue Armory ~The Audience as Art Movement

Ann Hamilton at the Park Avenue Armory ~The Audience as Art Movement | PublicArt | Scoop.it
Ann Hamilton’s art installation “the event of a thread,” at the Park Avenue Armory, features an immense curtain that dances when visitors swing.

 

Anyone who liked swings as a child — and that should include quite a few of us — will probably feel a surprisingly visceral attraction to Ann Hamilton’s installation “the event of a thread” at the Park Avenue Armory.

The work is the latest from one of the more self-effacing orchestrators of installation-performance art, and her first new piece in New York in more than a decade. It centers on an immense, diaphanous white curtain strung across the center of the armory’s 55,000-square-foot Wade Thompson Drill Hall. Dispersed on either side are 42 large wood-plank swings, suspended from the hall’s elaborately trussed ceiling beams by heavy chains that are also tied to the rope-and-pulley system that holds up the curtain.

The swings are there for us, to swing on. “The people formerly known as the audience,” in the memorable words of the media critic Jay Rosen, form a crucial ingredient of the work as never before in Ms. Hamilton’s art. The piece has other components, about which more in a minute, but if people are not using the swings, “the event of a thread” does not fully exist. When they are in action, the curtain, made of a lightweight silk twill, rises and dips, and the air is stirred, causing further billowing and fluttering.

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Going Public: Public Architecture, Urbanism And Interventions — The Pop-Up City

Going Public: Public Architecture, Urbanism And Interventions — The Pop-Up City | PublicArt | Scoop.it
Going Public: Public Architecture, Urbanism and Interventions provides another selection of creative forms of architecture in public spaces.

 

Going Public aims to inspire city planners on how to get people together in public spaces and encourage exchange of ideas. The book is a broad selection of examples on how this goal can be achieved. In the preface a link between Jane Jacobs’s theories about cities and the necessity of high-quality public spaces is made.

As noted earlier, the book is divided into six themes which all relate to the use of public architecture. The first theme focuses on spatial interventions or buildings that provide shelter. An interesting example here is the ‘Forest of Hope’ in Soacha, Colombia. This ‘forest’ consists of a green canopy in a depressed area which provides shelter to a broad range of activities for local citizens. The design symbolizes hope and nature in an urban environment.

 
Via Jandira Feijó
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V. Fabbri, L'Enfance de la ville. Essai sur Walter Benjamin

V. Fabbri, L'Enfance de la ville. Essai sur Walter Benjamin | PublicArt | Scoop.it

 

English translation below (from Google)

L’enfance de la ville, c’est le jeu que produit, dans l’espace urbain, la résurgence inopinée de figures matricielles : fragments de village, poussière des lieux, jeux de miroirs, tout ce à partir de quoi le nouveau prend corps et fait signe à ceux qui passent, inscrit en soi la forme du désir. C’est l’intermonde dont parle Kafka, figure du passage et de la métamorphose, paysage primitif qui ne cesse de reconfigurer le fond pulsionnel. C’est dans l’intermonde que la ville se fait familière aux étrangers, aux gens de passage, à ceux pour qui la précarité de la ville est l’image de leur propre précarité : « De ces villes restera ce qui les traverse, le vent » (Brecht).
La ville est le milieu où la technique se révèle un jeu héraclitéen avec la nature, où la préhistoire se noue à l’histoire. Destructions, constructions, chantiers, excavations ne cessent de produire des espaces de passages, interstices et seuils où le nouveau ne se distingue pas encore de l’ancien, voisine avec l’archaïque, intermonde.
C’est l’enfance qui saisit le mieux la vie de cet intermonde : placé entre un héritage qu’il ne sait pas comment recevoir et la difficulté à saisir ce qui se dessine, il opère un travail symbolique qui esquisse le visage de ce qui vient en tournant les yeux vers ce qui disparaît. La culture ne peut plus être pensée comme ce qui se transmet, pas davantage comme la construction d’une époque, mais plutôt comme la capacité d’accueillir ce qui arrive.

 

The children of the city, this is the game that are generated in the urban space, the recurrence matrix unexpected figures: fragments village, dusty places, mirrors, everything from how the new body takes and beckons to those who pass, inscribed itself in the form of desire. This is interworld mentioned Kafka figure of passage and transformation, primitive landscape which is constantly reconfigure the bottom drives. It is in the interworld the city is familiar to foreigners, people passing, those for whom the precariousness of the city is the image of their own insecurity: "Of those cities that remain through them, the wind "(Brecht).
The city is the environment in which the technique is a set Heraclitean with nature, which is tied to prehistoric history. Destruction, buildings, sites, excavations continue to produce areas of passages and gaps where the new threshold does not stand still the old neighbor with archaic interworld.
It is the child that best captures the life of this interworld: placed between a legacy he does not know how to receive and difficulty understanding what is emerging, it operates a symbolic outlining the face of what just turning his eyes to what disappears. Culture can no longer be thought of as what is transmitted, not more as the construction of an era, but rather the ability to accept what happens.

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Diversify or Die: Why the Art World Needs to Keep Up With Our Changing Society | Artinfo

Diversify or Die: Why the Art World Needs to Keep Up With Our Changing Society | Artinfo | PublicArt | Scoop.it
The realities of America's oncoming "majority minority" society, spotlighted by the recent election, have huge implications for the overwhelmingly white art world.

 

For make no mistake about it, the “emerging majority” thesis has great significance for art and its institutions. Cosmopolitan New York is a majority minority city, and has been for as long as anyone can remember. But walk from the subway towards any gallery opening or museum party, and watch the color drain away. In fact, for some time now, the people who crunch the data on cultural participation have been warning that the art world's inability to address this issue threatens its very future.

Back in 2010, the Center for the Future of Museums (CFM) issued a report with a title at once anodyne and urgent: “Demographic Transformation and the Future of Museums.” It is well worth reviewing in depth for what it says about the scandalous state of diversity in the visual arts, but its moral is really all summed up in the following line: “This analysis paints a troubling picture of the ‘probable future’ — a future in which, if trends continue in their current grooves, museum audiences are radically less diverse than the American public, and museums serve an ever-shrinking fragment of society.”

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Is LA the Creative or Anti-Creative City

The USC Price Urban Growth Seminar Series is a speaker series that explores how planning and policy can improve the well-being of individuals while building healthy places. This is a special session of SOC(i)AL: Art + People, a series organized by Freewaves about socially engaged art in Southern California.

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