Public Relations ...
Follow
Find tag "storytellingskills"
154.1K views | +16 today
Public Relations & Social Media Insight
PR insight, social media & thought leadership - from The PR Coach http://www.theprcoach.com
Curated by Jeff Domansky
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Story Radar -- Not Everything Is A Story | Seven Stories

Story Radar -- Not Everything Is A Story | Seven Stories | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The idea of storytelling for leadership and business is generating a lot of interest these days, as it well should. Stories are one of the most powerful ways to communicate. Stories can be memorable and meaningful. They’re immensely useful – whether you want to lead people, market your business, or just get some laughs. The best writers read a lot, and the best storytellers pay close attention and listen to the stories around them. But what exactly is a story, and what do you listen for?...


Via Karen Dietz
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Shawn Callahan's four story essentials are worth noting: time, place, dialogue, the unexpected

more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 11, 2013 6:02 PM

Got your story radar on?


I did not even know what this meant until I read this article by colleague Andrew Nemiccolo and listened to my colleague Shawn Callahan explain it.


Basically it is this -- not everything we hear is a story. And plenty of people are confused about this, as I can attest to in my own story work with clients.


Shawn offers us an activity that will get us to quickly understand the storied world we live in, and helps us know what a story is and is not.


Thans Andrew and Shawn for putting this together! I know I am going to use it with clients. And with myself too so I can continue to develop my story listening skills (those always need attention no matter how long you've been doing this work!).


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Karen Dietz's comment, January 12, 2013 3:56 PM
Absolutely Jeff. They are key essentials. I'm glad Shawn put these together to share with us.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

How will I know I have become a better storyteller? | Limor's Storytelling Agora

How will I know I have become a better storyteller? | Limor's Storytelling Agora | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

At the beginning, G didn’t know what to say.

I love this piece because of the question it asks! We get so focused on the doing doing doing of storytelling in our business, we rarely step back and ask ourselves, "How do I know I'm getting better at storytelling?"

This article comes from my colleague Limor Shiponi in Israel. Limor is one of the deep thinkers on the planet about storytelling and I highly prize her insights. It has been way too long since we've chatted and I miss hearing her magical voice and articulate thinking. In the meantime, I am delighted to share this piece with you.

Usually, if we are getting results in our business, we are happy. But if we don't periodically ask ourselves the question, "How will I know I have become a better storyteller?" our results -- when they fade (the normal ups and downs of business cycles) -- may be due our storytelling skills or something entirely different.

If you are not clear on how you'll know when you've become a better storyteller, in a down cycle you may start fixing the wrong things. Maybe your storytelling skills are fabulous but your marketing process is inconsistent. Maybe your marketing is awesome and your storytelling sucks. Without asking and paying attention to the question this article poses, you'll never know where to place your attention.

I ran across this article about 2 weeks ago and really took the time to ask myself this question. I came up with an answer and kept testing it out to make sure it was real. Here's my answer:

I know I will have become a better storyteller when I continually feel that resonance between me and my audience, and when people connect with me after they have heard one of my stories. I physically experience this band of gold and silver resonant energy linking me and my listeners together.

That's not very flowery language, but it does the trick for me. I can see several images in my minds eye of what this looks and feels like.

Now my experience can happen face-to-face or electronically. But of course, the best way to know if I've become a better storyteller is through live interaction. So practice practice practice your business stories with real people to build your skills and effectiveness.

OK -- that's me. Now it is your turn. How will you know you have become a better storyteller? What does that look and feel like for you?

Happy explorations :)

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


Via Karen Dietz
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

How To Tell Better Stories: 10 Profound Lessons From The Future Of Storytelling Conference

How To Tell Better Stories: 10 Profound Lessons From The Future Of Storytelling Conference | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Walking off the ferry into Snug Harbor on Staten Island, there was a big motorcade of cars and police standing there. SIt was the first and most obvious clue that this first ever Future of StoryTelling Conference might not be the same as any other business conference. As the crowd filed into the auditorium, Al Gore was among them … just one of the many influential participants at this event put on by media pioneer Charlie Melcher. The earlier clue that every attendee received was an email outlining their “homework” before the event, which involved watching about 15 films from visionaries and influencers like Tim Kring, Damian Kulash, Jake Barton, Margaret Robinson and others.

 

The event itself features minimal speaking from stage, and more roundtable discussions with each influencer throughout the afternoon – a “flip” from the traditional conference model. The morning on stage featured Damian Kulash from Ok Go playing guitar accompaniment to two storytellers from The Moth, a nonprofit group dedicated to storytelling. The day is one of those that will feature more soundbites and smart thinking, but in an effort to share some of the more profound lessons I wrote down after watching the videos and listening to conversations, here’s my top ten list (so far)...

 

[Rohit Bhargava shares his storytelling conference notes ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Offline Storytelling for Online Scanners -- How to share stories on the Internet

Offline Storytelling for Online Scanners -- How to share stories on the Internet | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Are you a headlines person? You know, the kind who reads the first few chapters of business books on Google and then move onto the next? Are you probably going to scan through this post for bolded phrases and numbered lists and then retweet it before really digging into the details?

 

What an interesting take on sharing stories on the Internet! I just love this new twist, and the ideas shared here for creating content. And with valuable points to take to heart.

 

The premis of this article is that many people will simply scan the content you create for your blog, website, social media posts, etc. Yet storytelling requires reading, not scanning.

 

So what's a person to do? Follow the advice here! Make your stories scannable, also. Seems like an oxymoron and there are times when it might not work. But then there will be times when you can follow the advice here and still have your stories be effective.

 

How do you do that? This author suggests saying the same things lots of times but in different ways, and using visual shortcuts.

 

Read the article to understand her points and think about what you might want to do.

 

Then share with me what your next steps are. I'd love to hear them!

 

Link to original article: 

http://www.bigspaceship.com/2012/07/offline-storytelling-for-online-scanners/ ;

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

How to Become a Content Marketing Hero by Emulating Apple and Subway

How to Become a Content Marketing Hero by Emulating Apple and Subway | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

As we saw last time, your startup becomes a hero by making your customers and clients the main hero. And rather than starting with trying to sell our ultimate products or services, we attract and mentor our prospects with content first.

 

If you are going to use the hero model in your biz storytelling, then you are going to want to read this article (I say that because there are other story models available).

 

I really like the examples and videos this author uses to illustrate his points -- they are very powerful. 

 

And I think the chart is brilliant. He also explains the structure for creating a hero story -- and focuses on the hero being your CUSTOMER, not you.

 

That is sometimes hard to get your head wrapped around, which is another reason why I like the examples & videos he chose. You will really experience the difference.

 

So go grab these insights and happy storytelling!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

 


Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's comment, June 14, 2012 2:39 PM
Many many thanks! You have made my day/weekend! :))
VIDEOWORLD's comment, June 14, 2012 2:50 PM
And you made mine also, it energized me beyond the normal "like it" my whole breakfast with my son was talking enthusiastically about the article , because the "Hero Journey" although a cliché has to be interiorized to apply it firmly and softly, and yor curation and the article are real examples of the long journey we have to achieve , more in the tradition of the Dao (wu wei) it has to apperar natural and effortless (although we know there is a lot of effort in achieving it)
Karen Dietz's comment, June 14, 2012 3:08 PM
You are so right Jose (I hope I have your name correct -- please illuminate me if not)! It takes work, effort and patience and to really be effective at this, must be internalized. I think the mono-myth of the hero does us a dis-service in many ways because it is not the only way to operate in the world. Yet I appreciated this article because it does such a good job of shifting the focus away from our own hero stories to those of our customers -- which will create much deeper relationships and meaning for us, them, and those hearing the stories. I'm glad it sparked such a fruitful conversation between you and your son!
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Seven tips in digital storytelling from the New York Times and CNN

Seven tips in digital storytelling from the New York Times and CNN | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

"We are in a golden age of storytelling" was the message shared by the New York Times's assistant managing editor Jim Roberts early on in a session at the News World Summit today named 'Obituary: The death of the traditional news story".

 

This article is slanted toward journalists. But think about it -- if you are using content, or creating content in your business to drive sales, then in many ways you are being a journalist. Especially if you attend conferences or events and report on those later to your customers/community.

 

So these 7 tips are pretty interesting and I bet you can incorporate many of them as your develop and promote your content. Like, 'avoid the 900-word valueless story' and 'incorporate live feeds' into your content. Hmmm -- that's an intesting one to get your head wrapped around. But that could be a lot of fun to do, especially at conferences or events.

 

So check these tips out. They are not your typical 'digital storytelling tips' that are a dime-a-dozen on the web. And I hope you get some good ideas!

 

Review written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
more...
Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, June 1, 2012 1:14 AM
Hi Karen,
thank you so much for appreciation about my suggestion.
Karen Dietz's comment, June 1, 2012 5:49 PM
You are the best Giuseppe! Thank you for thinking of me :)
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Inside the Storytelling Matrix, Part 1: Problem and Paradox

Inside the Storytelling Matrix, Part 1: Problem and Paradox | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

You’d think that a problem makes for an interesting story. But when it comes to telling the story of game-changing innovation, the “problem/solution” model is broken. This is why so many brands and causes have a hard time telling their story. When it comes to business, you want to introduce a paradox, not just a problem.

 

What a great post from colleage Michael Margolis on how to re-think the problem/resolution elements of a story into presenting the possbility & then the obstacle being faced.

 

This is an especially important insight for nonprofits to get because the problem/resolution set up starts out with a negative -- which can be a turn-off for people. As Michale says, we are surrounded by enough problems these days.

 

So turn the problem/resolution dyamic on its head and shift to presenting the possibility/obstacle dynamic instead.  That way you are leading with a positive, and then presenting the obstacle to overcome. Obviously then people's participation in the cause/business will help the obstacle be overcome. Or part of the obstacle has already been overcome with people's help.

 

Now, I would suggest doing the same for any business -- present the possibility and the obstacle, and then the resolution or call to action.

 

I be you'll feel better setting up your story this way, and so will your audience. Let me know how it goes!


Via Karen Dietz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

The power of a spoken word

The power of a spoken word | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Storytellers change their presentation style in different situations. What is suitable for an intimate venue, will not work as well in a large venue. What works for a circle of ten people, does not work in the same way for a circle of twenty-five. Even the hour of day, among many other things, might call for a different capacity or approach. Not everything is possible or fit for storytelling. Amplification might solve a volume issue but it doesn’t do much for intimacy. On the other hand there are situations where it does. The way to gain ‘elasticity’ that will enable a storyteller to adapt as needed, is by learning how to stretch and fold his own wings. It’s like learning how to diminish and increase sound in music. It’s not only changing the volume – the entire sound-production mechanism adapts.

 

[Image credit: brewbooks on Flickr]

 

Ahhh -- words of wisdom from one of my colleagues and favorite storytellers -- Llimor Shiponi. This post of hers is all about storytelling elasticity and the power of oral storytelling.

 

In this electronic age when digital storytelling is often viewed as THE SOLUTION -- this post is a reminder that oral storytelling is still the gold standard.

 

Want executive presence? Focus on building oral storytelling skills and sharing your stories in person as often as you can.

 

Want to increase business? Focus on building oral storytelling skills and sharing your stories in person as often as you can.

 

There's no substitute. Enjoy Limor's wise words of wisdom here!

 

And thank you Gregg Morris @greggvm for originally finding and sharing this article!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


[Finding your storytelling voice ~ Jeff]


Via Gregg Morris, Karen Dietz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Public Media Reinvents Itself With 'Full-Spectrum' Storytelling

Public Media Reinvents Itself With 'Full-Spectrum' Storytelling | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

"While not all agree, let's suppose, for a moment, that we are, in fact, presenting through our contemporary storytelling a relatively narrow range of the American experience. Some of the questions we ought to be asking are, is it enough to maintain the same formats, as we have, and try to entice more/different storytellers? Do we need to expand our awareness in some way to consider more broadly the particulars of this time, this particular space, and who is involved? And, fundamentally, what is it going to take to go further, to do more?"

 

Now here is a very thought-provoking piece about storytelling in general. I've curated it because the more businesses understand the craft of storytelling, the more effective we can be.

 

Warning -- there is such rich material here -- along with fabulous video examples to watch -- that you will need to carve out some time to explore everything here.

 

And hey -- we all live in a culture surrounded by media. It is important to keep up with shifts and changes in technology and its impact on storytelling so we can understand our daily life better -- and the opportunities open to us.  

 

What is the biggest shift technolgy brings? Ethnographic storytelling. What the heck is that? It is when you put the camera and the storytelling into the hands of people to create and tell their story. Nothing new here -- this was pioneered by Anthropologists Sol Worth & John Adair in the 1972 book Through Navajo Eyes.  The article contains several examples.

 

What is new is that now technology makes the ability to share our stories very easy and cheap to do -- through a proliferation of channels to share them. THAT is what is getting reinvented -- not the structure of a good story.

 

And technology is bringing us unique and very creative ways to craft our stories. For example, there's a link within this article to "How the Indie Audio Community Is Transforming Storytelling," This article shares a story where audio is dominant. It is great.

 

Other examples in the article include Localore -- a project about place-based storytelling.

 

What do I like about this article and the links to other articles within this piece? It asks essential questions like:

Who gets to tell the story? Who gets to ask the question that begins the story? What is the question?

 

When businesses and organizations start asking themselves these questions FIRST when wanting to tell a digital story, they focus on the story first. Too many people in my experience -- when wanting to tell a digital story -- get caught up in the technology first and end up spending tons of money with unhappy results. Or they think the story will emerge if they just start talking - to be edited down by the videographer into a story -- with the same unhappy results.

 

So read this article, its links to other articles, explore the digital story examples given, and start figuring out the following:

How can I have my customers share their stories about my organization using ethnographic storytelling? How can I leverage audio storytelling (see the article for info/examples) beyond radio & podcasts? How can I leverage location & physical space to share biz stories? How can I creatively use technology to share biz stories that reflect my/our Unique Voice & Unique Proposition?

 

I could comment at length on this article and its links. It has taken me awhile to curate this piece because I kept going back and dipping in for more.

 

So give yourself time to enjoy this creative romp exploring cutting edge electronic storytelling and all the deep insights here!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


[Karen's right. This is a rich vein of thinking about storytelling. ~ Jeff]


Via Karen Dietz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

How to Weave a Story that Instantly Captivates Your Audience

How to Weave a Story that Instantly Captivates Your Audience | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Most writers neglect the power of a story to captivate their audience immediately ...

 

This is a quick article with several key messages. But the one that strikes me is that when crafting a story, the most interesting beginning that gets reader's hooked, is often found in the middle of the story.


So true! And I love the example he uses to demonstrate this tip.

 

Beginnings and endings of stories are always hard for those new to storytelling. Even veteran storytellers could benefit from the author's tip here.

 

Think about your stories -- do they need an upgrade by exploring their middles and finding a more compelling opening?

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


[An inspiring example of storytelling by Sean D'Souza]


Via Karen Dietz
more...
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

“Why’s this so good?” No. 52: Joshua Davis and the diamond heist

“Why’s this so good?” No. 52: Joshua Davis and the diamond heist | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
You could argue that a writer has no business critiquing the work of one of his closest friends. Knowing the person behind the words influences the reading experience, making it impossible to approach the writing with fresh eyes.

 

Yet proximity also offers advantages when it comes to thinking about craft.

 

Knowing Joshua Davis, I can tell you that one of the keys to his success with stories like “The Untold Story of the World’s Biggest Diamond Heist” is that the man thinks in scenes. This isn’t necessarily a prerequisite for good narrative nonfiction; certain writers can sculpt compelling stories out of nothing more than their cognitive firepower. But more often than not, writing is enhanced by scenes: those sequences of action that, when enriched with the right detail, enable readers to do more than merely digest information about what took place. It lets them feel as if they’re there.


To pull this off with events you never witnessed, thorough back-reporting is a must. It’s the writer’s ticket to material about prior action and dialogue – to resurrecting the past on the page so that you’re sharing a yarn, not delivering a bunch of facts....

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Want To Be A Better Public Speaker? Do What The Pros Do (Stories!)

Want To Be A Better Public Speaker? Do What The Pros Do (Stories!) | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
For leaders at all levels, being an effective public speaker is essential for success. Here are some tried-and-true tips from the pros to help you raise your game.

 

I like this article because from the very beginning the author talks about how to give a fabulous presentation using story skills. Like -- "begin with the end in mind" and "simplify your messages" and "tell your personal stories."

 

She gives solid advice about things to remember to connect with your audience, how to avoid the perils of PowerPoint, and how to avoid sameness.

 

Good tips and insights all. And I've only mentioned a few. I wish more speakers took these ideas to heart. 

 

Read the article and get the rest of the goodies!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her Just Story It Scoops at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Four Ways Brands Can Build Better Relationships (via story sharing)

Four Ways Brands Can Build Better Relationships (via story sharing) | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Is your brand focused on transactions or interactions?

 

Why is this article showing up in this collection on biz storytelling?

 

Because the 4 ways brands can build relationships gets done through effective storytelling.

 

I love the 4 points made here in this quick read: branding is about building relationships to generate business, not pushing messages to make sales.

 

As a result, the game is now about human interactions instead of product transactions. What is the most effective way to promote human interaction? Story sharing!

 

This leads to point #4 -- relationships allow for organic discovery -- about your product/service, customer needs/likes/wants, potential innovations, new markets, etc.. The best vehicle for allowing organic discovery is story sharing.

 

Read the rest of the insights here. They make tons of sense. And if you like the ideas but want to know how to implement them -- then bring story sharing (telling your biz stories and listening to the stories of others in return) into your daily work life.

 

This is a game-changer.


Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's comment, May 31, 2012 7:04 PM
Thanks for re-scooping the article Jeff! Have a great rest of the week :)