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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
PR insight, social media & thought leadership - from The PR Coach http://www.theprcoach.com
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Twitter and news: The canary down the mine | Simon Ricketts

Twitter and news: The canary down the mine | Simon Ricketts | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

“Twitter does its best work in the first five minutes after a disaster, and its worst in the twelve hours after that.” - @rolldiggity

 

There is a quiet that descends in a newsroom when a big story breaks.... Twitter has often been touted as the “first with news”. From the miniscule to the massive. From Stephen Fry being stuck in a lift, to the Arab Spring rippling across North Africa, it is the instant source of a story, the first gurgle from a tap. The only way to find out what’s really happening, according to some.

 

But I’m beginning to think that so-called truth is losing some of its polish. I follow about 700 people on Twitter. I actually “watch” about three times that amount. I have lists of people I don’t follow. In other words, I can see them, without having to follow them. News people, experts, specialists, comedians, doctors, police officers, bloggers and bohemians. I’ve been on Twitter for more than three years. I like to think I’ve found much of the gold within its mines. When the first tweets about the Boston marathon explosions popped up in my timeline, I went over to my newsroom colleagues. I told them what was happening. And the process began. And I watched Twitter....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

As social media and traditional news intersect, interesting challenges arise for journalism.

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The fall and rise of magazines from print to digital

The fall and rise of magazines from print to digital | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Declining sales do not mean the end for glossies. More platforms mean better ways of connecting people with their passions...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The Guardian looks at the future of magazines...

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Steven Mallach's curator insight, November 30, 2013 12:14 AM

Combining digital and print and providing insight that online versions (geared to the short attention span audiences of today) cannot match within the confines of limited space amy be the future of mags.

 

With the increasing reliance on mobile (tablets not withstanding) as a delivery channel print publications  in  niche markets especially may still have decades of life.

 

It's worth noting that the human eye and brain are designed to both focus and note peripheral value aded information. The printed page offers value at a glance - and the decision to immerse the mind in the content is made on a variety of levels. Although online delivery is without doubt more interactive the interactivity demands actions on the part of the reader which include steps that may interupt the smooth delivery of information.

 

A well designed print page (infographics / images . charts etc) can convey just enough to hold the attention of the reader immediately.

 

Just a thought.

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Business Insider Just Told College Students Their Secrets of Success | MediaShift

Business Insider Just Told College Students Their Secrets of Success | MediaShift | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A bit more than four years after its launch (and six years after the launch of its smaller predecessor Silicon Alley Insider), BI has become one of the boldest business news sites in the world. Its coverage base has expanded from tech and Wall Street to areas such as politics, retail, advertising, sports, science, and military and defense. It boasts roughly 100 staffers and 25 million monthly unique visitors (though Compete.com pegs uniques at 3.8 million last October). Amid jabs at its editorial and aggregation practices, it is regularly held up as a digital news success story -- with hopes its profits will match its web hits in the years to come. As 24/7 Wall St. shared last summer, "Operators of traditional sites are left to wonder if they have to copy some of BI's editorial tactics and give up decades-old values or be trampled by BI as it scrambles to increase its audience and expand into new operations ... BI has given readers what few sites do -- almost no reason to go elsewhere to get information." During the recent Spring National College Media Convention staged by the College Media Association (CMA), Weisenthal and Carlson, two of BI's chief operators, shared advice with student attendees about web writing, audience building, social media mechanics, and a few old-school journalism fundamentals.... Below is a top 10 sampling of their tips and perspectives....
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Watch Out CNN: New Twitter Search Capabilities Will Rule Breaking News | ReadWrite

Watch Out CNN: New Twitter Search Capabilities Will Rule Breaking News | ReadWrite | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
If Twitter can now assemble the raw materials of news into a meaningful place to see and understand what's happening anywhere in the world, on any topic, the instant it starts to matter, why would anyone get breaking news from another source?

 

Twitter Tuesday announced new search capabilities that give it the upper hand as a breaking news destination over basically every other news organization on the planet, from newspapers to cable networks to websites and everything in between. 

 

When a new search begins to trend on Twitter, Twitter's new API will send the query toAmazon's Mechanical Turk service, where humans will categorize it to help make it more relevant to readers. Then Twitter can populate its Discover section with live, topical streams of news.

 

If they want to keep up, other organizations that exist to break news need some new ideas, and fast...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is BIG NEWS for big news organizations if you catch Jon Mitchell's drift. Maybe even a game changer for Twitter too.

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