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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
PR insight, social media & thought leadership - from The PR Coach www.theprcoach.com
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Pepsi CEO's Mother Had A Brutally Honest Reaction To Her Daughter’s New Job

Pepsi CEO's Mother Had A Brutally Honest Reaction To Her Daughter’s New Job | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Nooyi says she isn't sure her daughters would say she's a good mom.


While interviewing Indra K. Nooyi, the CEO of PepsiCo, at the Aspen Ideas Festival Monday*, David Bradley, who owns The Atlantic, asked two questions that elicited as frank a discussion of work-life balance as I've seen from a U.S. CEO. Below is a lightly edited transcript. The second question was preceded by a brief discussion of Anne-Marie Slaughter's "Why Women Still Can't Have It All.".

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is a great story with refreshing candor about the challenges of senior management for women. Applies to dads too. Recommended reading. 9.5 / 10

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Seth's Blog: How to draw an owl

Seth's Blog: How to draw an owl | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The problem with most business and leadership advice is that it's a little like this:


The two circles aren't the point. Getting the two circles right is a good idea, but lots of people manage that part. No, the difficult part is learning to see what an owl looks like. Drawing an owl involves thousands of small decisions, each based on the answer to just one question, "what does the owl look like?" If you can't see it (in your mind, not with your eyes), you can't draw it.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Another super Seth Godin post reminding us that sometimes simplifying is silly.

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B2B Marketing Trends That Will Shape Your Strategy - Anders Pink

B2B Marketing Trends That Will Shape Your Strategy - Anders Pink | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

B2B marketing strategies are having to constantly change and adjust in the light of new trends driven by B2B buyers and technology. We have identified the key B2B marketing trends and how they may shape your future strategy. To keep this article short, as there is a lot to cover, we have put in links to more detailed articles as appropriate, should you want to read further.


Typically B2B marketing is segmented into outbound marketing such as email campaigns and inbound marketing such as SEO, social media and content marketing. The general shift has been towards inbound marketing as buyers increasingly manage the early stages of the buying process without contacting vendors by reviewing websites, talking to peers in the industry and reviewing resources. This allows them to often filter and shortlist without ever talking to a sales rep....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Steve Rayson shares eight valuable marketing trends that will impact how you develop your business strategy.

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The Power of I Don't Know

The Power of I Don't Know | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In a 2012 study on the state of marketing conducted by IBM, 52 percent of Chief Marketing Officers said that they are unprepared for the expected level of complexity over the next five years. Which only makes me wonder whether the other 48 percent were posturing, daydreaming when they answered the survey, or really think they have it all figured out.


From big data to the myriad of little dials we need to turn in managing our brands, there has never been more to do, less time in which to do it, and such a paucity of patience for poor performance.So what’s a marketer to do? Develop more sophisticated systems and tools? Invest in new methodologies and engagement strategies? Create deeper integration between every function in their business--from IT and Finance to Customer Service and Sales?


(Yes, yes, and yes.)...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

If you don't know every answer, there can be value in admitting it up front.


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If I Read One More Platitude-Filled Mission Statement, I'll Scream | Harvard Business Review

If I Read One More Platitude-Filled Mission Statement, I'll Scream | Harvard Business Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Bland mission statements are worse than boring; they confuse your strategy.

 

Let's start with a game. Below are three mission statements from three Fortune 500 companies. Try to match each company with its mission statement...

 

How did you do? The largely indistinguishable statements make the task almost impossible. Such statements may still be considered "best practice" in some quarters but in so many cases they do not achieve what they were intended to achieve. Ironically, many "directional documents" are not fit for purpose: they do not provide direction....

 

[This was a refreshing POV and must-read ~ Jeff]

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Kaley Hannon's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:24 AM

Similar to the video we watched in class this article discusses the common mission statement and how it usually is so broad that you are unable to determine what company it is even for. It argues that most companies lack a statement that is both concrete and inspirational. They refer to this as strategic intent and they give 3 tips to create a good one. The first tip is to stop fixing the words and start asking yourself which decision will be better. The second tip is to make the statement concrete and narrow. The last tip is to make it even more clear.

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Best Way to Make Employees Better at Their Jobs | Inc

Best Way to Make Employees Better at Their Jobs | Inc | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Forget trying to come up with motivational tools and "tricks." There's a better--and simpler--way to get more out of your staff.

 

..."I was sitting in front of my computer, trying to come up with something I could tell all these smart people in my company that would help them do their job better," Moorehead says, "and I realized that what I really should be doing is asking them what I should do."... 

 

[Inspiring advice for ALL managers - JD]

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Five Leadership Keys from Dirty Harry - Forbes

Five Leadership Keys from Dirty Harry - Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Want to know what Dirty Harry's leadership keys are? It's simple: No matter how badly things were going, Harry got results.

 

...Here are his five leadership keys — and you can use them, not shoot anyone, and still be a good company man or woman....

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How To Say “This Is Crap” In Different Cultures

How To Say “This Is Crap” In Different Cultures | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...Managers in different parts of the world are conditioned to give feedback in drastically different ways. The Chinese manager learns never to criticize a colleague openly or in front of others, while the Dutch manager learns always to be honest and to give the message straight. Americans are trained to wrap positive messages around negative ones, while the French are trained to criticize passionately and provide positive feedback sparingly.


One way to begin gauging how a culture handles negative feedback is by listening to the types of words people use. More direct cultures tend to use what linguists call upgraders, words preceding or following negative feedback that make it feel stronger, such as absolutely, totally, or strongly: “This is absolutely inappropriate,” or “This is totally unprofessional.”


By contrast, more indirect cultures use more downgraders, words that soften the criticism, such askind of, sort of, a little, a bit, maybe, and slightly. Another type of downgrader is a deliberate understatement, such as “We are not quite there yet” when you really mean “This is nowhere close to complete.” The British are masters at it.  The “Anglo-Dutch Translation Guide”, which has been circulating in various versions on the Internet, illustrates the miscommunication that can result....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Stereotypes aside, there's great insight into cross-cultural communication from Harvard Business Review.

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wanderingsalsero's curator insight, February 28, 3:40 AM

Very interesting and, IMHO, has value even for people write for culturally homogeneous audiences.

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Content marketing: What is more important than strategy?

Content marketing: What is more important than strategy? | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In content marketing, your ability to execute strategy is as important – if not more important – than the strategy itself.


I had a marketing strategy professor who used to say, “A mediocre strategy with good execution beats a great strategy with poor execution every time.”He wasn’t promoting mediocre strategies. He was emphasizing the most important reason for strategic planning: to EXECUTE a strategy that achieves your business objectives.Otherwise, there’s no point in strategic planning....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

How to execute content marketing strategy to compete on the social Web in real-time.

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How to Analyze Your Startup Like A VC in 15 Minutes Or Less

How to Analyze Your Startup Like A VC in 15 Minutes Or Less | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When I first started in venture capital five years ago, I wanted to create a programmatic way to analyze companies well. My goal was to be able to step into a meeting with an entrepreneur with some kind of form that I would fill out throughout the meeting, so that by the end of the meeting I might have an understanding how the startup fits into its ecosystem.


It took quite a while to devise this framework and to revise it until it became useful, practical and insightful. I spoke with friends who were consultants and who analyze companies for a living. I read many books on the topics of competition and strategy. Last, I spoke with other investors.


But in the end I chose three simple frameworks that were already well-known and which fit together on two sheets of paper: The Business Model Canvas, Porter’s Five Forces, and Value Chain Analysis....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Like management acronyms? How about BMC, P5F and GUF?  In just 15 minutes, VC Thomasz Tunguz can analyze a startup business using three invaluable management analytical tools. Excellent read for you post-MBA types or those who enjoy thinking analytically.

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The Benefits of Poetry for Professionals | Harvard Business Review

The Benefits of Poetry for Professionals | Harvard Business Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Even avid readers may be missing a genre valuable to their personal and professional development.

 

...I've written in the past about how business leaders should be readers, but even those of us prone to read avidly often restrict ourselves to contemporary nonfiction or novels. By doing so, we overlook a genre that could be valuable to our personal and professional development: poetry. Here's why we shouldn't.

 

For one, poetry teaches us to wrestle with and simplify complexity. Harman Industries founder Sidney Harman once told The New York Times, "I used to tell my senior staff to get me poets as managers. Poets are our original systems thinkers. They look at our most complex environments and they reduce the complexity to something they begin to understand." Emily Dickinson, for example, masterfully simplified complex topics with poems like "Because I could not stop for Death," and many poets are similarly adept. Business leaders live in multifaceted, dynamic environments. Their challenge is to take that chaos and make it meaningful and understandable. Reading and writing poetry can exercise that capacity, improving one's ability to better conceptualize the world and communicate it — through presentations or writing — to others....

 

[Poetry in PR or your business? You may not want to present this idea to the CEO just yet. But if it gets results, it's a winner. A tantalizing and poetic approach to management. ~ Jeff]

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Gamo-science's curator insight, May 20, 2013 11:26 AM

Huir de este mundo con la tinta olvidada de la mente...

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The No. 1 Enemy of Creativity: Fear of Failure | Harvard Business Review

The No. 1 Enemy of Creativity: Fear of Failure | Harvard Business Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
To innovate, stop worrying about "failure" and start thinking of "learning."...

 

...For me, the most important insight from design thinking was that you have to make sure you've defined the right problem before you try to solve it. So, you act like an anthropologist to understand human needs and problems before jumping to solutions. Most of us in business, if we need to discover how to do something new, use PowerPoint or Excel spreadsheets to rationalize our approach. This is what I call "the illusion of rationality." Whether motivated by a lack of insight arrogance, or stupidity, the illusion of rationality is a waste of time and resources — yet one that keeps a lot of people employed in management consulting, as I learned first hand.

 

Instead, if you don't have the data, you have to create the data. That does not mean plugging random numbers into your spreadsheet. It means generating real insight, from nothing. Designers and bootstrapped entrepreneurs I've worked with use rapid low cost experiments to create data. I refer to these "affordable losses" in the interest of learning, creativity, and discovery as "little bets."

 

This seems like common sense; so why is it so hard? Three words: fear of failure.

 

If you're an MBA-trained manager or executive, the odds are you were never, at any point in your educational or professional career given permission to fail, even on a "little bet." Your parents wanted you to achieve, achieve, achieve — in sports, the classroom, and scouting or work. Your teachers penalized you for having the "wrong" answers, or knocked your grades down if you were imperfect, according to however your adult figures defined perfection. Similarly, modern industrial management is still predicated largely on mitigating risks and preventing errors, not innovating or inventing....

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The Difference Between Strategists and Strategic Planners - LDRLB

The Difference Between Strategists and Strategic Planners - LDRLB | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...An organization’s best strategists are in the C-Suite, and the CEO is usually the catalyst. C-Suite strategists can draft an effective Strategic Plan within a day because they have an intimate knowledge of the business and are constantly thinking strategically. The best ones bring clarity and purpose to a document that can be written on just one piece of paper.

 

Here are the key differences between the species...

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