Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Why Simplicity May Be the Secret to Brand Success

Why Simplicity May Be the Secret to Brand Success | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The success of a new breed of emerging brands can be attributed to doing business in the simplest way possible. Here's why simplicity rules.


At Siegel+Gale, we release an annual Global Brand Simplicity Index that examines the global state of simplicity for the world's leading brands.


The recent report also shows how consumers ranked 40 of the most prevalent, so-called "disruptive" brands in the US and UK. The disrupters outperformed the incumbent brands in every category, particularly in the US where, compared to their established counterparts, they took eight of the top 10 spots based on their simplicity score....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Fascinating report and findings on disruptors and simplicity in the business model of startups.

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13 Growth Hacking Techniques You Can Apply Right Now - Piktochart

Say you have a startup idea. You assemble a team and in six months, you have a product you are actually confident to release. When that day finally comes, you launch and nothing happens. If you are lucky, you get an article on Techcrunch, a top spot in Product Hunt and several thousand users, but most of them stop using it after a few days.


I bet you were hoping for a huge, viral growth curve. Instead, you face with the harsh reality: you only have handful of users registered, and they are churning incredibly fast. At Piktochart we went through the same problem, that’s why in this post we’ll analyze 11 different growth hacking tactics that actually work...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Learn some key growth hacking skills and practices to be applied to for your digital marketing. Use these techniques for overall marketing prowess.

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Top 100+ management resources - Must read

Top 100+ management resources - Must read | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Fast-moving technologies, rapid global expansion, shifting business models, mergers and acquisitions all hold out dazzling possibilities.


But leadership remains a huge challenge, even for companies relatively unscathed by the economic by economic turmoil. Today, employees continue to seek guidance from their leaders, who must find time to reassure their people while trying to establish a pole position for the future.Make sure to read....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Top 100+ management resources: change management, corporate culture, values, organizational alignment, employee engagement, performance. strategy and more.

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Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, February 16, 2015 2:07 PM

Here's the motherload!

Les DIGIVORES's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:15 AM

A big list of resources on change management

Fabrizio Cappelli's curator insight, May 7, 2015 3:33 AM

I fully agree ......

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101 Startup Failure Post-Mortems

101 Startup Failure Post-Mortems | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...And so while we have dug into the data behind startups that have died (as well as those acqui-hired) and found they usually die 20 months after raising financing and after having raised about $1.3 million, we thought it would be useful to see how startup founders and investors describe their failures.  


While not 50,000 ways it cannot be done, below is a compilation of startup post-mortems that describe the factors that drove a startup’s demise.  Most of the failures have been told by the company’s founders, but in a few cases, we did find a couple from investors including Roger Ehrenberg (now of IA Ventures) and Bruce Booth (Atlas Venture). They are in no particular order, and there is something to learn from each and every one of them....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Why they failed? A compilation of startup failure post-mortems by founders and investors. No survivorship bias here.

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Need an economics lesson? Look to ‘The Simpsons,’ professor says - The Boston Globe

Need an economics lesson? Look to ‘The Simpsons,’ professor says - The Boston Globe | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

You might not have known it, but all those episodes of ‘‘The Simpsons’’ were just secret economics lessons. Turns out the yellowish, four-fingered cartoon characters have a lot of insight to offer on basic economic theory.


We know this thanks to Joshua Hall, an associate professor of economics at West Virginia University — and the brains behind the new book ‘‘Homer Economicus: The Simpsons and Economics’’ (Stanford University Press)....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

I wish he'd been my economics prof. DOH!

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How To Say “This Is Crap” In Different Cultures

How To Say “This Is Crap” In Different Cultures | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...Managers in different parts of the world are conditioned to give feedback in drastically different ways. The Chinese manager learns never to criticize a colleague openly or in front of others, while the Dutch manager learns always to be honest and to give the message straight. Americans are trained to wrap positive messages around negative ones, while the French are trained to criticize passionately and provide positive feedback sparingly.


One way to begin gauging how a culture handles negative feedback is by listening to the types of words people use. More direct cultures tend to use what linguists call upgraders, words preceding or following negative feedback that make it feel stronger, such as absolutely, totally, or strongly: “This is absolutely inappropriate,” or “This is totally unprofessional.”


By contrast, more indirect cultures use more downgraders, words that soften the criticism, such askind of, sort of, a little, a bit, maybe, and slightly. Another type of downgrader is a deliberate understatement, such as “We are not quite there yet” when you really mean “This is nowhere close to complete.” The British are masters at it.  The “Anglo-Dutch Translation Guide”, which has been circulating in various versions on the Internet, illustrates the miscommunication that can result....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Stereotypes aside, there's great insight into cross-cultural communication from Harvard Business Review.

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wanderingsalsero's curator insight, February 28, 2014 6:40 AM

Very interesting and, IMHO, has value even for people write for culturally homogeneous audiences.

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Content marketing: What is more important than strategy?

Content marketing: What is more important than strategy? | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In content marketing, your ability to execute strategy is as important – if not more important – than the strategy itself.


I had a marketing strategy professor who used to say, “A mediocre strategy with good execution beats a great strategy with poor execution every time.”He wasn’t promoting mediocre strategies. He was emphasizing the most important reason for strategic planning: to EXECUTE a strategy that achieves your business objectives.Otherwise, there’s no point in strategic planning....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

How to execute content marketing strategy to compete on the social Web in real-time.

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How to Analyze Your Startup Like A VC in 15 Minutes Or Less

How to Analyze Your Startup Like A VC in 15 Minutes Or Less | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When I first started in venture capital five years ago, I wanted to create a programmatic way to analyze companies well. My goal was to be able to step into a meeting with an entrepreneur with some kind of form that I would fill out throughout the meeting, so that by the end of the meeting I might have an understanding how the startup fits into its ecosystem.


It took quite a while to devise this framework and to revise it until it became useful, practical and insightful. I spoke with friends who were consultants and who analyze companies for a living. I read many books on the topics of competition and strategy. Last, I spoke with other investors.


But in the end I chose three simple frameworks that were already well-known and which fit together on two sheets of paper: The Business Model Canvas, Porter’s Five Forces, and Value Chain Analysis....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Like management acronyms? How about BMC, P5F and GUF?  In just 15 minutes, VC Thomasz Tunguz can analyze a startup business using three invaluable management analytical tools. Excellent read for you post-MBA types or those who enjoy thinking analytically.

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The Benefits of Poetry for Professionals | Harvard Business Review

The Benefits of Poetry for Professionals | Harvard Business Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Even avid readers may be missing a genre valuable to their personal and professional development.

 

...I've written in the past about how business leaders should be readers, but even those of us prone to read avidly often restrict ourselves to contemporary nonfiction or novels. By doing so, we overlook a genre that could be valuable to our personal and professional development: poetry. Here's why we shouldn't.

 

For one, poetry teaches us to wrestle with and simplify complexity. Harman Industries founder Sidney Harman once told The New York Times, "I used to tell my senior staff to get me poets as managers. Poets are our original systems thinkers. They look at our most complex environments and they reduce the complexity to something they begin to understand." Emily Dickinson, for example, masterfully simplified complex topics with poems like "Because I could not stop for Death," and many poets are similarly adept. Business leaders live in multifaceted, dynamic environments. Their challenge is to take that chaos and make it meaningful and understandable. Reading and writing poetry can exercise that capacity, improving one's ability to better conceptualize the world and communicate it — through presentations or writing — to others....

 

[Poetry in PR or your business? You may not want to present this idea to the CEO just yet. But if it gets results, it's a winner. A tantalizing and poetic approach to management. ~ Jeff]

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Gamo-science's curator insight, May 20, 2013 2:26 PM

Huir de este mundo con la tinta olvidada de la mente...

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The No. 1 Enemy of Creativity: Fear of Failure | Harvard Business Review

The No. 1 Enemy of Creativity: Fear of Failure | Harvard Business Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
To innovate, stop worrying about "failure" and start thinking of "learning."...

 

...For me, the most important insight from design thinking was that you have to make sure you've defined the right problem before you try to solve it. So, you act like an anthropologist to understand human needs and problems before jumping to solutions. Most of us in business, if we need to discover how to do something new, use PowerPoint or Excel spreadsheets to rationalize our approach. This is what I call "the illusion of rationality." Whether motivated by a lack of insight arrogance, or stupidity, the illusion of rationality is a waste of time and resources — yet one that keeps a lot of people employed in management consulting, as I learned first hand.

 

Instead, if you don't have the data, you have to create the data. That does not mean plugging random numbers into your spreadsheet. It means generating real insight, from nothing. Designers and bootstrapped entrepreneurs I've worked with use rapid low cost experiments to create data. I refer to these "affordable losses" in the interest of learning, creativity, and discovery as "little bets."

 

This seems like common sense; so why is it so hard? Three words: fear of failure.

 

If you're an MBA-trained manager or executive, the odds are you were never, at any point in your educational or professional career given permission to fail, even on a "little bet." Your parents wanted you to achieve, achieve, achieve — in sports, the classroom, and scouting or work. Your teachers penalized you for having the "wrong" answers, or knocked your grades down if you were imperfect, according to however your adult figures defined perfection. Similarly, modern industrial management is still predicated largely on mitigating risks and preventing errors, not innovating or inventing....

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The Difference Between Strategists and Strategic Planners - LDRLB

The Difference Between Strategists and Strategic Planners - LDRLB | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...An organization’s best strategists are in the C-Suite, and the CEO is usually the catalyst. C-Suite strategists can draft an effective Strategic Plan within a day because they have an intimate knowledge of the business and are constantly thinking strategically. The best ones bring clarity and purpose to a document that can be written on just one piece of paper.

 

Here are the key differences between the species...

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5 methods for innovation you should try in your Team • Inspired Magazine

5 methods for innovation you should try in your Team • Inspired Magazine | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Benjamin Franklin once said: “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”


At the SAP Design & Co-Innovation Center (DCC) at SAP we frequently organize the so-called “Method Mondays”, a regular one-hour meeting series in which the team members share, practice, and test different methods.


In this article I would like to share the 5 methods with you that work best for us – it’s worth trying!...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Do you work with teams? Here are 5 strategic ways to build team results. Recommended reading. 9 / 10

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Leadership: The Tony Soprano Problem

Leadership: The Tony Soprano Problem | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Today, every manager has some version of the Tony Soprano problem.  We’ve become used to hierarchal organizations optimized for specific tasks.  Now we often find that we’re competing in a networked world in which the old rules don’t apply.  Rather than traditional lines of authority, we need to start thinking in terms of ecosystems, platforms and movements....
Jeff Domansky's insight:
The role of leaders has changed. We can no longer command people to do what we want, but must inspire them to want what we want. Lessons from Tony Soprano.
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 19, 2015 10:09 AM

Leadership must change from a hierarchal to a networked world model. Tony Soprano would be challenged.

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How Medium Is Building a New Kind of Company with No Managers

How Medium Is Building a New Kind of Company with No Managers | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

But Medium isn’t just taking a revolutionary approach to digital publishing — it’s changing the way companies operate too. As one of the fiercest and most faithful adopters of Holacracy – a radical new theory of corporate structure — Medium is experimenting with a completely management-free environment that’s laser focused on getting things done. Stirman couldn’t be more thrilled with the results: the freedom, the momentum, the productivity are all unparalleled, he says.


But companies don’t have to go all-in on Holacracy to reap the benefits. If his transition from Twitter to Medium taught him anything, there are always more tactics to try to make things work better. Below, he shares his lessons from taking the leap....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is a brilliant management read and highly recommended. 10/10

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Marco Favero's curator insight, February 3, 2015 4:33 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

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Who is Jack Ma, the man behind the largest ever tech IPO? | Telegraph

Who is Jack Ma, the man behind the largest ever tech IPO? | Telegraph | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Jack Ma transformed China’s export economy with Alibaba, the retail giant poised to overtake Walmart with the biggest market debut in US history.


Jack Ma, China’s leading internet entrepreneur, once described himself as a “crocodile in the Yangtze”. The technology chief was busy discussing the battle between Alibaba, the online shopping company he founded, and eBay, the global auction site which used to dominate the Chinese shopping market.


“If we fight in the ocean, we lose; but if we fight in the river, we win,” he claimed. He proved his point when Alibaba’s Taobao auction site overtook eBay’s Chinese business and left it for dust. But that is not the only way Ma’s colourful analogy resonated.Ma has also demonstrated a crocodile’s ability to stalk his prey largely undetected....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Interesting profile of the man who would be king of online marketing.

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