Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Why The Sound of a Brand Name Matters

Why The Sound of a Brand Name Matters | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The sound of a word like "knife" or "truck" seems totally arbitrary—it’s just a random sound we’ve assigned to a thing, right? But for several decades, scientists have found good evidence that the sound of words have meaning in a very real way.


Sound can convey subtle information about traits such as size, shape, smoothness, and also, according to a new study in Cognition, distance. This suggests that while the sound of company and product names—Lyft, Smuckers, Nike—may seem meaningless, it may actually quietly shape consumers' perceptions.


This is what’s called "sound symbolism"—the theory that there’s an intrinsic meaning we unknowingly attach to certain speech sounds. Sound symbolism is probably best illustrated by a well-known study from 1929 by the renowned linguist and anthropologist Edward Sapir.


In his experiment, Sapir had people assign two fake words—"mil" and "mal"—to either a larger or smaller table. And what he found was pretty astonishing: The majority of participants called the smaller table "mil" and the larger table "mal." Since Sapir made up the words "mil" and "mal," he concluded that people inferred word meaning from the sound.


Over the decades, researchers have verified and added to what Sapir discovered in his study, that certain speech sounds have meaning, separate from the definition of a word itself. They’ve found links between word sounds and concepts for all sorts of characteristics, including size, shape, speed, weight, sharpness, and creaminess.


"Sound symbolism says that people have this intuition, that there are right words for certain things," explains Sam Maglio, one of the authors of the new Cognition study and an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Toronto Scarborough....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Brand names reveal a lot more than you think, as the fascinating science of "sound symbolism" suggests.

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This Brand's Amazing New Logo Responds to Voice and Looks Different to Each Person

This Brand's Amazing New Logo Responds to Voice and Looks Different to Each Person | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Brands talk endlessly about attention to individual customers. But Brazilian telecom company Oi has extended that idea to its very logo—a shapeshifting mark that responds to sound and looks different to every customers who speaks to it.


"We developed an interactive approach to the identity, experimenting with sound and touch activation, so that there could be as many subtle variations of the Oi logo as there are people who interact with it," says Wolff Olins, the design shop behind it.


Wolff Olins worked with digital art and design studio Onformative on the concept. Onformative built bespoke software that allows anyone to animate the Oi logo with any sound at all—including voice, but other things like music too—and then to save their own unique version based on that sound input....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Shape-shiting logo really is innovative.

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Uber, your new logo is a mistake and looks like JPMorgan's

Uber, your new logo is a mistake and looks like JPMorgan's | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, Uber unveiled a new look, including, among other things, a new app logo. In a complete departure from its original icon featuring a stylized “U,” the new icon is a non-distinct image of a square embedded in a circle (in rider apps) or a hexagon (in partner apps). 


According to Uber, the square represents the bit (as in the basic unit of information in computing) — a concept central to Uber’s business philosophy.Uber argues that its new look would “…provide consistency, highlight information and make our brand easy to recognize.” While Uber’s new logotype and website design might be aligned with this goal, its new app logo is not; the new logo is far less recognizable as representing the Uber brand than the one it replaced....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Some say: Don't replace the stylized white and black “U” for the “atom and bit.” I actually like it.

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Sundance's First Digital Storytelling Conference Showcases the Best in Brand Videos

Sundance's First Digital Storytelling Conference Showcases the Best in Brand Videos | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

As digital video and streaming services continue to recast the viewing landscape, a handful of digital executives and Sundance Film Festival attendees pushed to have the burgeoning videosphere represented during one of filmmaking's highest-profile events—and Rick Parkhill, CEO of VMA Media, made it happen.


After securing support from sponsors Twitter, Fullscreen, Maker, Zefr, Above Average, Hulu and Naritiv, he persuaded festival organizers that this was, in fact, a viable extension, and Digital Storytelling was born. The event kicks off Thursday, Jan. 21, on the eve of the film festival, with additional sponsors including CNN's Courageous content studio, Fox Network Group's True(x) and The Huffington Post signing on....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Storytelling moves up the creative food chain at the Sundance Film Festival. Learn some interesting perspectives on brand storytelling.

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Beyond Partnerships, Brands Should Build 'Ecosystems'

Beyond Partnerships, Brands Should Build 'Ecosystems' | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Brands looking to be successful in the world of fragmented, distracted and time-crunched consumers, might not be rated just on how well they serve customers’ needs, but how well they work with others to combine forces. 

In the latest edition of its Sentinel Report, software developer and technology services company Globant suggests companies that find partners to provide a “seamless ecosystem” will be well-positioned to meet consumers’ needs in the future. 

“The main goal for brand ecosystems is to lean on the best attributes of both companies to improve the offering with the clear goal of making life easier for consumers,” Martín Migoya, Globant CEO and co-founder, tells Marketing Daily. “As a result, consumers are often more engaged with brands and share a greater stake in their success.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

An important point of view about brands and partnerships.

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Os Ishmael's curator insight, August 10, 2015 5:45 PM

An important point of view about brands and partnerships.

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Brands must ditch the notion of having it all

Brands must ditch the notion of having it all | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A recent ad for Clinique lipstick proclaims: "Have it all", suggesting that a simple cosmetic product is the answer to one of the most complex questions of our time; that ever-elusive quest for balance in our ‘always-on’ world.


Yet, somewhat ironically, the brand’s own research suggests that more women than ever are rejecting the empty rhetoric and bluster implicit in this strapline. In fact, according to its ‘The Truth About Happiness: What Women Want’ research, 77% of women in the UK feel that trying to have it all has actually served only to make us more unhappy....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Brands must ditch the notion of having it all, The continuing debate on whether women can achieve a truly successful work-life balance belies a fundamental shift in consumer aspirations, writes Nicola Kemp.

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Study Finds Brand Reputation More Important to Consumers than Price

Study Finds Brand Reputation More Important to Consumers than Price | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Everyone knows price matters to consumers, but a new study suggests the lowest price doesn’t always win. Even more important to consumers is the reputation of retailers—and how prices correlate to that brand reputation.


Price Still Matters


This guideline comes from Concordia University’s John Molson School of Business, which does agree that price remains an important factor for businesses. But price is a relative figure that relates to the reputation of a business, and consumers typically gauge whether a price is good based on how it compares to a brand’s reputation.


In other words, a high price isn’t a deterrent to many consumers, as long as it corresponds to a positive reputation. When price and reputation seem misaligned, consumers are turned off....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The results are in: When price and brand reputation seem misaligned, consumers are turned off. But when reputation soars, pricing becomes secondary.

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Marco Favero's curator insight, May 17, 2015 6:22 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Clark Stott's curator insight, June 1, 2015 12:02 PM

Move your business away from price wars and discounting! Build your reputation so you can work with your ideal clients more often and start building your prices! Almost all of us will pay more for a better product or service, but we have to believe it is better and also better value. Being expensive is fine, being over-priced is not! Show your value by becoming a leading authority and an educator in your field. The better you become at educating your ideal clients the more you can charge for your services.

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How to lay out your 5-year brand strategic plan on one page | Beloved Brands

How to lay out your 5-year brand strategic plan on one page | Beloved Brands | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The same leaders who use the phrase: “Let’s all get on the same page”, then send out 110 slide Powerpoint presentations. We take it serious enough to create a Brand Strategy Roadmap that you can use to frame the next 5 years of your brand strategy, and fit it on one page. This way,  you really can get everyone on the same page.  


The master brand strategy roadmap


Having the brand road map on one page can help align everyone that works on a brand. This is especially useful when managing a Branded House or Master Brand where there are various people in your organization that each run a small part of the brand. The road map helps guide everyone and keep them aligned.


Here’s the one I use that has all the key elements....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Graham Robertson shows how to get your brand strategy and team onto one page. Recommended reading. 9/10

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What is a Brand? | Terrie Ard

What is a Brand? | Terrie Ard | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Let's cut to the chase, your brand is not your logo, your identity or your product. Your brand is the gut feeling an individual has about your product, service or organization. It’s all the unique qualities that make you different, valuable, memorable and trustworthy. It signifies a promise of value, and reflects how your organization emotionally connects with consumers. Crucially, your brand is not what your company says it is, but what your target market says it is....
Jeff Domansky's insight:
Consumers today have an overabundance of choices and a shortage of time. So why, now more than ever, branding is so important.
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When Brands Fail To Remain Relevant, They RadioShack - Who's Next?

When Brands Fail To Remain Relevant, They RadioShack - Who's Next? | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Now that the buzz and media frenzy about the demise of RadioShack and the analysis of why by Wall Street and other experts  is beginning to subside, another consideration should be examined. What happens to brands that do not remain relevant, stop innovating and sit on their hind quarters? Well in short, they RadioShack….
Jeff Domansky's insight:
Add a new verb to your marketing vocabulary: RadioShack. Good read about brand relevance. 9/10
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Social Selling 2015: Top 100 Influencers & Brands | Onalytica

Social Selling 2015: Top 100 Influencers & Brands | Onalytica | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Why should we care about social selling? Isn't it just another one of those buzzwords used to describe something we already know about? Isn't it just sales under a different name? If that's true then why are we seeing organisations increasingly using new digital channels as part of their sales strategy?


Maybe it's because engaging with our audiences in new ways is just more exciting than traditional sales channels as it provides a way of interacting with our potential buyers. It's also because it's a lot cheaper, digital channels allow us to reach a wider audience, with the same resources. We're having a look at who is the most influential in this up and coming topic, and figure out what brands are driving most engagement on social media....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Onalytica provides a valuable list of 200 top content marketing influencers and leading 200 content marketing brands on Twitter. Good follows. 10/10

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Hand-picked Brand Style Guide Examples by Saijo George

Hand-picked Brand Style Guide Examples by Saijo George | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Hand-picked collection of brand style guide examples, pattern libraries and design manuals for inspiration. Find all the best style guides in one place. Maintained by Saijo George, find me on Twitter or LinkedIn.
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The best of identity design 2014

The best of identity design 2014 | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

So another year comes to a close and BrandNew have published their now traditional  ‘The Best and Worst Identities of 2014′


In which (as the name suggests) they highlight the Best and the Worst of Identity design, all in their opinion of course, but they are usually pretty spot on.


Overall I agree with most of the selection of the good and the, ahem, not so good (to put it politely). Here’s a selection of some of our favourites of the year….

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Creativity with your coffee. Enjoy these inspiring visuals. Recommended viewing. 9/10

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Authentic 100

Authentic 100 | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Since 2012, Cohn & Wolfe has studied authenticity as a guiding principle and business practice. Each year, our research reveals more insight on the strategic power of authenticity and its unique opportunity to build reputation.

Cohn & Wolfe has discovered a huge authenticity gap in the eyes of global consumers. With 75 percent of consumers surveyed in 14 markets believing that companies are not open and transparent, it’s clear that brands have a credibility problem.
 
Our 2016 findings reveal that cynicism towards brands is highest among Western European countries, while high growth / low per capita GDP countries recognize authenticity in brands the most.
 
Across global markets, approximately one in five consumers finds brands “Open and Honest.” At 23 percent, the US places just above the global average. In Western Europe, a mere 5 percent of consumers in Sweden consider companies “Open and Honest,” while the UK, France, Germany and Spain all match the same low level at 7 percent.  
 
Brazil, while generally higher than Western Europe, is still lower than the US at 19 percent.  
 
Even in China and Indonesia, where consumers are least pessimistic about brand authenticity, only about a third of the population (36 percent and 35 percent, respectively) consider companies “Open and Honest.”  
 

The opportunity for businesses to close this gap is staggering....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Interesting report by Cohn & Wolfe provides insight into consumer views of authenticity, global brands and what brands might do to close the gap in the future. Recommended reading. 9/10

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Sponsors Flee Sharapova After Doping Admission

Sponsors Flee Sharapova After Doping Admission | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Nike has suspended the eight-year, $70-million contract it renewed in 2010 with tennis star Maria Sharapova after she announced yesterday that she had failed a doping test taken during the Australia Open in January, where she advanced to the quarterfinals. Porsche this morning said that is will “postpone planned activities” with the 28-year-old, Russian-born athlete. And Swiss watchmaker Tag Heuer said it would not renew a deal with Sharapova that expired at the end of 2015. 

The banned substance in her system, meldonium, is a drug manufactured in Latvia that is not legally available in the United States. Sharapova said her family doctor had prescribed it for her a decade ago for several health issues. She admitted she had received an email on Dec. 22 announcing the ban but said she had not clicked through on the link....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This story illustrates the perils of personalities, personal endorsements, sponsorships and brand integrity.

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Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 9, 6:59 AM

This story illustrates the perils of personalities, personal endorsements, sponsorships and brand integrity.

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With Millions Of New Bottle Designs, Every Diet Coke Will Soon Be Unique

With Millions Of New Bottle Designs, Every Diet Coke Will Soon Be Unique | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Today, you probably know Diet Coke for its silver and red branding—which is more or less how it’s looked since Coca-Cola’s sugar-free alternative first launched in 1982. But starting this month, in a market where diet soda sales are down, Diet Coke is going bespoke, as millions of unique designs are hitting U.S. shelves for the first time as part of a campaign called "It’s Mine."

So for the next several months, no two 12-ounce bottles of Diet Coke will look exactly alike.

"Personalization and customization is a huge trend, obviously," says Rafael Acevedo, group director of Diet Coke in North America. With Coca-Cola’s first major personalization campaign, Share a Coke in 2014, the company put thousands of people’s names onto bottles. The idea was that you’d spot someone’s name and want to buy them a Coke—and it’s an idea that worked, with measurable uptake in both short term sales and longer term brand loyalty. For Diet Coke, that concept got a tweak. "In this case, it’s more personal, "Acevedo says, "to have that sense that Diet Coke is giving you something no one else can have."...