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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
PR insight, social media & thought leadership - from The PR Coach http://www.theprcoach.com
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Lessons for journalism from a nonprofit's social engagement campaign | IJNet

Lessons for journalism from a nonprofit's social engagement campaign | IJNet | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...World Pulse's recent Girls Transform the World campaign invited girls and women to identify, share and reflect on barriers to girls' education and to propose solutions. World Pulse received hundreds of responses from some 60 countries, including from repressive societies where girls’ stories often go untold.


The community shared stories about the effects of education policies, child marriage and pregnancy, security and school facilities. In addition to creating an active discussion inside the community, World Pulse aggregated and organized 350 stories and gave them to delegates of the G(irls)20 Summit, who then delivered the communiqué to the G20 summit.IJNet recently spoke with World Pulse Digital Action Campaign Manager Leana Mayzlina and Content Coordinator Kim Crane, and came away with these tips for engaging a community...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Excellent case study in community engagement, nonprofit PR and activism...

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The Anatomy of the Occupy Wall Street Movement on Twitter | MIT Technology Review

The Anatomy of the Occupy Wall Street Movement on Twitter | MIT Technology Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A study of the social network behind the Occupy movement shows that the most vocal participants were highly connected before the protests began but have now largely lost interest, say social network researchers....


The Occupy Wall Street movement began in September 2011 as a grass roots protest against the inequality, greed and corruption associated with the financial sector of the economy. The movement adopted the slogan: ”We are the 99%” which refers to the distribution of wealth in the US between the richest 1 per cent and the rest.


What was extraordinary about this movement was the speed with which it spread, passing rapidly between communities via social media and Twitter in particular.So an interesting question is how this movement became so big, so quickly and what has happened since to the most active participants....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

I guess they're Occupied elsewhere? ;-)

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Klaudia Lewis's comment, September 26, 2013 6:26 PM
Before discussing The Occupy Wall Street Movement in class I was unaware of this protest. I find it very fascinating that a movement of this sort spread rapidly through social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. Studies discussed in this article reveal that people who were interested and supported the Occupy Wall Street movement are no longer concerned. After selecting a small fragment of online users to study it showed that "the most vocal participants appeared to be highly connected before the movement began". After learning more about this movement in my tutorial it was apparent that The Occupy Wall Street protest had no specific goals and the protest was not planned properly, this explains its reasons for failure. I believe the power of social media can have a a large impact on events and contribute to the success of them.
Jeff Domansky's comment, September 26, 2013 7:15 PM
Klaudia & Sophie, I enjoyed your perspectives on OWS.
David Blomfield's comment, September 26, 2013 10:00 PM
Great article pick Sophie. Before class I also didn't have any knowledge of The Occupy Wall Street Movement protest. I found it hard to believe that it wasn't as popular today as it was when it was created until we looked at what went wrong with the movement such as the poor communication and organisation. Due to the unclear aim of the group many people had different ideas of what the group was actually protesting, when the media asked different people in the group each person had a different answer. The important aspect of this movement was the organisation through social media and how truly powerful it can be. I thought it was a great article and recommend it to all.
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Fake Exxon Twitter Account Mocks Arkansas Spill Response

Fake Exxon Twitter Account Mocks Arkansas Spill Response | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

An Exxon parody Twitter account is tweeting fake public relations updates about the oil company's ruptured Pegasus pipeline, which spilled at least 84,000 gallons of heavy crude oil into residential streets in Mayflower, Ark., last week. The account was inspired by @BPGlobalPR, a fake BP account that attracted tens of thousands of followers after the infamous Deepwater Horizon blowout. (The real BP Twitter account, @BP_America, has just 52,000 followers, compared with the parody account's 145,000.) Though it only began tweeting Tuesday, the parody Exxon account @ExxonCares has garnered more than 600 followers and has sent tweets mocking the company's response to the spill. ExxonMobil has more than 34,000 real Twitter followers....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Holy hacktivism Batman! Exxon is the target of of a phony Twitter account as it tries to clean up the environmental and reputation mass from an oil spill.

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Anonymous Hacktivists Choose Targets of Opportunity

Anonymous Hacktivists Choose Targets of Opportunity | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Hacktivism, as practiced under the name Anonymous, is about public relations opportunism and any organisation could become a target if a political rationale can be retro-fitted to the attack, according to a leading web security researcher.

 

"In hacktivism it's all about the PR impact," Tal Be'ery, web security research team leader at Imperva's Application Defense Center (ADC), told CSO Online. "It doesn't matter to the press whether a really significant site was taken down, DDoSed or whatever. It's all about being successful, no matter what."

 

From a PR point of view, the specifics of how the hacktivist affects the target don't matter. Whatever happens, the hack will generate media coverage for the cause....

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Human Microphones thwart heavy-handed bans

Human Microphones thwart heavy-handed bans | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

I've always been tempted to play with IABC's tagline, "Be Heard." Do we business communicators really want to be the noise makers and talking heads? Or do we rather want to be the 'inside voice' of business strategy?

 

That’s why when I first began paying attention to the ’Occupy” movement (OWS and its franchises Occupy Oakland, Occupy Denver, Occupy Phoenix etc) I argued that we shouldn’t be too hasty to think of them as a fringe movement craving just to be heard. Hard to pigeon hole, it was too easy to dismiss them because they didn’t fit the model of activist movements. I was reminded of something innovators have reminded us from time to time. Disruptive ideas do not stem from existing templates. Marshall McLuhan put it well when he observed “I don’t know who discovered water, but it wasn’t a fish.”

 

Watching OWS evolve, it is interesting to see how they are inventing a new template for being heard. Make that being taken seriously. They may be leaderless, but have found ways to have their own media team, financial system, and trademark bids. And I don’t mean media in the way we tend to think of it -the kind that come with a lens, a ‘like’ button, or segmented followers....

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New target for 'Occupy Wall Street' critics: Media - Keach Hagey

New target for 'Occupy Wall Street' critics: Media - Keach Hagey | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The Times and NPR distance themselves from freelancers accused of getting too close to protests.

 

Conservatives looking to delegitimize the Occupy Wall Street protests have a new tactic — targeting journalists.

 

The criticisms are a kind of conservative twofer, allowing them to hit old targets like NPR and The New York Times by raising questions about their objectivity, while at the same time undermining the grass-roots claims of the new protest movement by suggesting it has professional help — or at least professional cheerleaders....

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Of PR and protest: The Times They Are A-Changin’

Of PR and protest: The Times They Are A-Changin’ | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

‘Occupy Wall Street’ teaches PR lessons — and risks of rushing to judgment

 

Walking past the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest in New York City, as I did last week, it would be easy to dismiss its relatively small size, incoherent message, and messengers who (for the most part) don’t look and sound like mainstream America. To do so would be a mistake. There’s a level of public relations sophistication at work here that could have unpredictable consequences.

 

Case in point: following the October 1st arrests of some 700 protesters on the Brooklyn Bridge, a PR battle ensued...

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5 Online Tools For Activists, By Activists

5 Online Tools For Activists, By Activists | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Why are social networks powerful tools for causes and campaigns? Many times, people begin to engage in activism only after they’ve been attracted by the fun stuff in a campaign — connecting with old friends and sharing photos, for example. When they witness others participating, they’ll be more likely to join the cause. With socializing as the primary draw, it’s become easier for organizers to attract more and more unlikely activists through social media.


But once a campaign reaches its critical mass, activists might think about moving to other platforms made with their needs — especially digital security — in mind. Platforms like Facebook and Twitter will remain standard fare for online activism. But the time is right for niche-oriented startups to create tools that can supplement these platforms. Here are a few worth investigating....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

There's some interesting points made about activism for public affairs and PR pros. These five sites are also worth monitoring to keep the pulse of what's going on in activism.

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Fired Social Media Editor Shares Reuters’ Twitter Guidelines; Demonstrates Professional Risks One Takes On Twitter | AllTwitter

Fired Social Media Editor Shares Reuters’ Twitter Guidelines; Demonstrates Professional Risks One Takes On Twitter | AllTwitter | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

... You may have heard of Matthew Keys. He’s a journalist who was indicted by the Department of Justice (DoJ) for allegedly “giving hackers access to the servers of his former employer, the Tribune Company. Tribune owns the Los Angeles Times, which the Anonymous hacker subsequently defaced.”

 

Keys was also, until recently, the social media editor for Reuters. After being let go today, he shared the news organization’s Twitter guidelines – and they demonstrate the dangers of combining personal and professional tweets online. In a blog post, Keys shares reasons why Reuters was mad at him (and fired him) and that list includes the following:

 

"Reuters said it had a problem with the perceived relationship between my Twitter account and their news organization. A Reuters manager said it was troublesome that several people associated my work on Twitter with the company, pointing to my Twitter bio that said I was a Reuters journalist. Reuters’ Twitter Guidelines, which you can read here, states that Reuters journalists are always expected to identify themselves as such"....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

More insight into an interesting case of journalism, activism and social media.

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Issues Management: Activism on the Menu for Kraft | The PR Coach

Issues Management: Activism on the Menu for Kraft | The PR Coach | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Never underestimate the influence of two Mommy bloggers and the power of online activism.

 

A recent online petition at Change.org, has gathered more than 278,000 supporters protesting against food dyes added to several popular Kraft macaroni and cheese products....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

A classic grassroots activist campaign against Kraft food dyes gains momentum. Lots of lessons.

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Will the #Occupy movement have a second act? | Argyle Communications

Four possible futures for a movement built through successful public relations

 

This week’s media stories are filled with speculation about the future of the international movement ignited by the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ demonstrations in September. The question is a compelling one: has the protest movement passed its peak, or does it have a ‘second act?’

 

It’s easy to see the media’s interest in this question; the narrative of rise, setback and either downfall or comeback is a familiar one — not just in news but also in literature and film. And setbacks often involve flashpoints — such as the tragic death of a Vancouver protestor last weekend. Such incidents, along with colder weather across the northern hemisphere, will give rise to debates about whether authorities should work toward an orderly shutdown....

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Anonymous threatens Fox News Web site over Occupy coverage

Anonymous threatens Fox News Web site over Occupy coverage | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Hacker group says in a new video it will take down the network's Web site on November 5 for what it calls biased coverage of the Occupy Wall Street protests.

 

The group said it is targeting the network for what it called biased news coverage of the Occupy Wall Street protests occurring in cities across the country.

 

The network's "continued right-wing, conservative propaganda against the occupations" is the group's catalyst for its intention of "destroying the Fox News Web site," a digitally generated voice on the video explains. "Since they will not stop belittling the occupiers, we will simply shut them down."...

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Everything The Media Told You About Occupy Wall Street Is Wrong

Everything The Media Told You About Occupy Wall Street Is Wrong | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
I finally made it to Occupy Wall Street on Tuesday and had a chance to see for myself what's going on. My conclusion: almost everything the media told me about the protest is wrong.

 

Based on my observations, here's what I consider the Top Ten Myths About Occupy Wall Street....

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