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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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How to Self-Publish Your Book on a Budget | Mediashift

How to Self-Publish Your Book on a Budget | Mediashift | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

For many authors, self-publishing is a first option instead of a backup to traditional publishing. Two years ago I broke down the costs to self-publish a high-quality book. The costs covered how much a traditional publisher typically spends on a book.


The book publishing industry is one of the last industries to go digital, and things are constantly in flux. What worked yesterday might not work next week.


Putting together a quality book involves not just writing it, but getting it edited and formatted, designing a cover, and having a marketing strategy around it.


The rise of new tools, platforms, and new entrants to the publishing space have made it even easier and faster to get a book out into the world. As a follow-up to my first piece, I’ve written a piece on how to publish on a budget....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Nice checklist to help you plan to self-publish your next book project.

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, June 10, 5:54 AM

A lot of people are self publishing there books including me! I woul like to recommend self publishing to all my acquaintances! 

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How to Create Picture Ebooks for Kids

How to Create Picture Ebooks for Kids | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

While the KDP Kids’ Book Creator still has a few rough spots (which Amazon is presumably ironing out in response to user feedback), it’s a good start. Those of us who have worked in children’s publishing for years recognized this move for what it was: a game changer.

Just how much has Amazon’s new free software changed the game?

With the release of the Kid’s Book Creator, as well as the Kindle Fire HD Kids Edition tablet, Amazon is investing in illustrated ebooks. And they need content.

So now comes the big question. Are you ready to ride this wave?...

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Janika Puolitaival's curator insight, March 5, 8:18 AM

Something to do with visiting class? Start in the library and continue in the glassroom?

Jill M Roberts's curator insight, March 19, 7:01 PM

Perfect if you have ideas and want to publish children's lit!

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Reality Check: Sizing Up VC-Backed Publishers' Prospects

Reality Check: Sizing Up VC-Backed Publishers' Prospects | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Amid widening concerns that another startup bubble has formed, digital media remains a white-hot market among the private-investment community.


Last year, venture capital poured at least $683 million into digital media companies worldwide -- more than twice the $277 million invested in 2013, according to Preqin, which tracks venture-capital investments.


That investment comes as traditional media companies like The New York Times and Condé Nast cut staff, trim costs and turn over every possible rock in search of new revenue streams. Meanwhile, digital media companies -- which have a fraction of old media's revenue and even less of their profits -- are awash in investor cash....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Michael Sebastian posts a very interesting look at "new media" startups and the competitive landscape with "old" media. A must-read. 9/10

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Creating new forms of journalism that put readers in charge | Poynter.

Creating new forms of journalism that put readers in charge | Poynter. | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

… We began our New York meeting by trying to understand why media companies have largely failed to take advantage of the incredible power of the Web and mobile devices.


We identified four forces that have stymied innovation:

1.  Content Management Systems. They are designed to convert old media into new media and they provide little flexibility to experiment with new journalistic forms.

2.  Newsroom culture. The rhythm in most newsrooms is based on a well-established work flow that produces predictable content. It’s not easy to suggest a wholesale change.

3.  Product managers on the business side. They’re accustomed to selling the old recipe and often seem perplexed by new approaches.

4.  Editors/news directors. They’ve got other priorities — such as having to choose people for another round of layoffs — and often don’t have the resources for a new venture....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Bill Adair provides a really insightful analysis of news and journalism trends.

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Seven mobile statistics that should spur digital publishers to action | IJNet

Seven mobile statistics that should spur digital publishers to action | IJNet | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...What small and large digital publishers ought to learn from these figures is that the public is moving so quickly to mobile consumption of news and social sharing that they need to take action.


In this kind of environment that requires rapid shifts in tactics and strategy, small news organizations that live only on the web have an advantage. They can move faster without having to worry about generating revenue to service debt or other legacy costs.


The rise of mobile and the rise of social media sharing represent a huge opportunity for those who are ready for it. And a huge missed one for those who are not.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Can publishers, not to mention marketers, PR and advertising agencies catch their breath long enough to catch up to mobile consumers?

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aanve's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:41 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Diego Luengo's curator insight, February 26, 2014 3:21 AM

...empieza a ser raro ir por la calle y ver a alguien que no esté mirando el móvil...

 

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Readers don't draw a line between self-publishers and trad publishers

Readers don't draw a line between self-publishers and trad publishers | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Consumers don't make a distinction between traditional publishers and self-publishers when buying ebooks, according to a wide-ranging new study.


The Book Industry Study Group’s latest report, Consumer Attitudes Towards Ebook Reading, also shows that readers prefer ebooks over print books in 10 out of 14 subject areas, including all fiction genres.


Ebooks have a big lead over print in all areas of fiction, covering romance/erotic, mystery/thriller, general, religious, young adult, science fiction/fantasy and literary.


The ebook lead is narrower in non-fiction for business/finance and history/politics/social sciences and print takes over for how-to guides/manuals and travel while comics/graphic novels and cookbooks are preferred in print by a long way....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Valuable research for publishers and content marketers...

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Annika McGinley's curator insight, November 20, 2013 5:14 PM

This doesn't surprise me at all - without the tangible branding that screams out from the cover, ebooks level the playing field.

 

Tom Evans's curator insight, November 22, 2013 9:54 AM

Music to the ears of an author

Ica Iova's curator insight, November 24, 2013 2:52 PM

Opinions

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Kindle Singles: Growing, but Maintains Focus

Kindle Singles: Growing, but Maintains Focus | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The Kindle Singles store, according to its editor David Blum, is “like a bookstore where the manager also edits the books.” Blum is that manager-editor, and under his guidance the store has grown to feature nearly 400 works since launching in January 2011. When the store went live, its mission was to publish the kind of long-form journalism that has become harder to find as more magazines have shuttered and those still standing allocate fewer pages to in-depth pieces.


Since the Singles program started, it has gained enough respect to attract major names—among the many heavy hitters who’ve released Singles are Christopher Hitchens and Stephen King—and to delve into fiction.


Blum, a veteran of alternative weeklies—he worked at both the Village Voice and the New York Press, during the papers’ headier days—has gained a fair amount of attention since the store took off. In an April profile in the New York Times, Leslie Kaufman wrote that he has “transformed himself from doctor of the dying to midwife of the up-and-coming,” becoming “a man whom authors want to court.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Publishing and journalism Renaissance? Maybe...

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California newspaper defies industry wisdom to stay alive – and prospers

California newspaper defies industry wisdom to stay alive – and prospers | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

... It was an industry-wide response, and readers noticed, Brusic said. "Imagine it's your daily coffee. Each time you put down your money the cup gets smaller and the brew gets weaker. That's essentially what's happened to American newspapers. We took things away from people and at the same time gave content away free on the web. How crazy is that? The industry committed a kind of institutional suicide over time."Some, like the Rocky Mountain News, closed. Others, like the San Francisco Chronicle, limped on, feeble, malnourished versions of former selves....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Baffling newspaper survival story as the Orange County Register defies industry trends.

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The newsonomics of the mobile aggregator roundup

The newsonomics of the mobile aggregator roundup | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Flipboard, Zite, Pulse, and their peers are giving news companies a second chance at dealing with the rise of aggregators. Will they come out of this round any better than the last?. What are we to think when the aggregators start getting aggregated?...

 

...It’s absolutely clear why companies are (over-)spending on mobile aggregator plays. Mobile is the greenest field around. We — news consumers — are flocking there. The speed of our migration is breathtaking. About a third of all traffic to news sites now comes from mobile, up from just 25 percent a year ago. Tablet usage, as early adopters are joined by legions of others, keeps growing, and smartphones (which just officially passed dumb phones) are markedly increasing news audience consumption worldwide. (The New York Times debuted a new mobile site yesterday, with the promise of more mobile movement to come.)

 

The common belief: Mobile traffic will exceed web traffic within two to three years. But mobile monetization still gives everyone fits. Match up the 33 percent usage number for news publishers against ad monetization that amounts to no more than 10 percent of their overall digital advertising; for most, it’s considerably less than that....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Recommended reading...and a fresh perspective of the challenges of monetizing content.

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Social reader Flipboard’s new app lets you make your own magazines | memeburn

Social reader Flipboard’s new app lets you make your own magazines | memeburn | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Social reader app Flipboard has already gathered a substantial base of more than 50-million happy flipping users, who can subscribe to read beautiful magazines constructed from social media updates and RSS feeds. But it’s not finished with the community just yet: its app experience has now become even more personalised with the addition of new features which allow its users to make their own custom magazines.

 

Yep. If you’re bored with the seemingly endless Flipboard-curated categories covering everything from DIY to news, tech, travel and sport, you can now create your own magazine from whichever social media and online sources you wish. In a bid to make everyone an editor as well as a reader, the new version (which hit Apple’s App Store today) has introduced a new ‘+’ button which allows users to quickly add a video, article, photo or audio clip to their own magazines. Unfortunately, it just extends to individual posts at this stage, not entire feeds.

 

Capitalising on niche interests, these magazines can be set as public or private, and shared, subscribed to and commented on by other users. Flipboard is also helping to promote the shift to user-curated content by highlighting interesting new user-curated magazines through a new ‘By Our Readers’ section in its content discovery section....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Encouraging development for curators, marketers, PR and content pros. 

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Digital publishing is changing magazines, just don't call it 'content' | TheMediaBriefing

Digital publishing is changing magazines, just don't call it 'content' | TheMediaBriefing | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

One of the first things that crops up in conversation these days is the language of digital. The word content is over-used by marketers and publishers. The term does a disservice to the creative process behind it. I find it quite hard to think of stories as content – it’s so far removed from what it takes to do. In the digital age, journalism is still – just – clinging on by its fingernails and using the catch-all moniker of content is not helping its standing.

 

Content covers all players, from finely honed pieces by professional journalists and commentators, to rants by amateurs. However, just because everyone now has access to a publishing platform online, doesn’t meant quality editorial is a dying art, nor does it mean that those producing quality editorial should ignore the changes happening in the publishing world. On a site like xoJane – to which I contributed to for a short stint – you’re trying to connect with people. You’re no longer handing down stone tablets for them to read. I think that’s a very important – and good – part of what’s happened to communication....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

All about content, there I've said it!

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Mcommerce a top focus for publishers and readers | QR Code Press

Mcommerce a top focus for publishers and readers | QR Code Press | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Ebooks have become a high priority for both consumers and the authors of the latest publications. Authors, publishing houses, and consumers alike are all beginning to choose the digital copy ... ...

 

Many of these publishers are getting started with a number of controversial titles to draw attention to themselves. Though they may not be able to draw the big name authors, quite yet, these small mcommerce companies are including controversial titles among their offerings in order to help to help to build recognition.

 

For instance, one of the latest ebook launches that was meant to attract attention includes one written about Anne Hathaway, the actress, and how her popularity has generated considerable “hatred”. This was released by Entertainment Concepts Press.

 

Many of these publishers, including the one mentioned in the above example, are focusing exclusively on mcommerce. These books will not be published on paper, but will instead be sold over mcommerce as ebooks that can be read on ereaders, tablets, and even the occasional smartphone or laptop screen. All of the major bookstores that sell online are jumping on the digital bandwagon and have built up an extensive list of downloadable offerings. This is especially popular for the bookstores that have their own ereaders and tablets to sell, as well.

 

According to Jeff Bezos, the CEO of Amazon, when discussing the topic of ebooks over mcommerce, “We’re now seeing the transition we’ve been expecting.” This was a statement that was made in late December 2012. He added that “After five years, ebooks is a multi-billion dollar category for us and growing fast — up approximately 70 percent last year. In contrast, our physical book sales experienced the lowest December growth rate in our 17 years as a book seller, up just 5 percent.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

eBooka making powerful inroads with consumers and publishers and marketers are responding...

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Why digital natives prefer reading in print. Yes, you read that right.

Why digital natives prefer reading in print. Yes, you read that right. | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Textbook makers, bookstore owners and college student surveys all say millennials still strongly prefer print for pleasure and learning, a bias that surprises reading experts given the same group’s proclivity to consume most other content digitally. A University of Washington pilot study of digital textbooks found that a quarter of students still bought print versions of e-textbooks that they were given for free.

“These are people who aren’t supposed to remember what it’s like to even smell books,” said Naomi S. Baron, an American University linguist who studies digital communication. “It’s quite astounding.”
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Words worths!

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Teresa Levy's curator insight, March 5, 10:09 AM

the pleasure of reading comes first, so much you can hug it, smell ie, hear the pages and all sorts of things you cannot with a digital plataform

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, March 5, 9:46 PM

I guess, millennials will continue to favour the print format of textbooks, journals and other reading materials. Somehow, it is easier to make annotations in the print format than in the digital format. As a millennial myself, I prefer to go for the print format than the digital format, although I have just completed reading 'She' by Sir Henry Rider Haggard on my I-Pad! Added to this is the fact that because of the advent of the digital version ( The couple of books I have published are also available in the digital version), one gets to buy a lot of printed books really cheap. It is a steal, but then I wonder how long this will go on, for surely one day or the other we will run out of printed books! One saving grace  for the print format is however, that according to Naomi, some young students, "who aren't supposed to remember what it's like to even smell books" are the ones who still prefer the print format, although I guess this was strongly because they were offered the print formats for free!

Michael Jongen's curator insight, March 8, 7:28 PM

This confirms what I hear anecdotaly when I speak to colleagues 

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What Happens When (Virtually) No One Buys Your Book

What Happens When (Virtually) No One Buys Your Book | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Last week, my seventh book, Philadelphia, was released. In many ways it is the best writing I have ever done, particularly in terms of fiction, and I thought the concept — a collection of short stories, a few op-ed essays, quotes, and lists, all relating to my beloved city of Philadelphia in one way or another — was interesting and appealing.

Clearly, very few people agreed because, well, it didn't exactly do Harry Potter numbers.Don't get me wrong. I'm not naive. This is my seventh time going through this process of self-publishing a book, so it's not like I wasn't prepared. I know the figures. I know that the average U.S. book is now selling less than 250 copies per year and less than 3,000 copies over its lifetime and that over 60% of self-published authors make less than five thousand dollars per year from their writing....
Jeff Domansky's insight:
You spent all that time and energy on your book. Then, crickets. Now what?
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Marco Favero's curator insight, February 22, 8:19 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Kym Reinstadler, SCN Feature Writer's curator insight, February 22, 12:11 PM

Several of my dearest friends have written and self-published books. They are not novice writers. Yet, marketing the titles rivals the amount of time writing them. All sell books, but find it very difficult to get noticed by readers you don’t already know. You can pay 101 cottage industries for help to teach you how to self-publish in “underserved” genres. Do it if you want, but don’t expect to get rich. Write because you have a passion to share what you know about a subject. Sorry to be the goddess of cold showers, but if your satisfaction is measured in book sales, you won’t want to put finger to keyboard again. Truth in numbers is that you can count a book-writing endeavor a success if you can cover publication and promotional costs. Please write. But don’t expect the star treatment. It almost never happens, even if the content is good.

Kym Reinstadler, SCN Feature Writer's curator insight, February 22, 12:15 PM
Kym Reinstadler, SCN Feature Writer's insight:

Several of my dearest friends have written and self-published books. They are not novice writers. Yet, marketing the titles rivals the amount of time writing them. All sell books, but find it very difficult to get noticed by readers you don’t already know. You can pay 101 cottage industries for help to teach you how to self-publish in “underserved” genres. Do it if you want, but don’t expect to get rich. Write because you have a passion to share what you know about a subject. Sorry to be the goddess of cold showers, but if your satisfaction is measured in book sales, you won’t want to put finger to keyboard again. Truth in numbers is that you can count a book-writing endeavor a success if you can cover publication and promotional costs. Please write. But don’t expect the star treatment. It almost never happens, even if the content is good.

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What It's Like Competing With VC-Fueled Media Startups

What It's Like Competing With VC-Fueled Media Startups | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

It's an eye-opening report that looks beyond the hype surrounding these companies. Some of them are profitable (or at least claim to be), some aren't, but all of them have raised serious cash from starry-eyed investors (e.g., $96.3 million for BuzzFeed, $110 million for Vox).


The business press tends to regard such hefty sums as implicit evidence of success and/or promise -- why would venture capitalists risk so much scratch if there was no there there? -- but Michael reminds us that all of these companies rely, somewhat harrowingly, on advertising for revenue....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

New-media startups face the same business goal (eyeballs!) as legacy publishers. so why, asks Simon Dumenco, are venture capitalists so smitten with digital?

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The Big Shift in Newspaper Revenue - AJR.org

The Big Shift in Newspaper Revenue - AJR.org | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Newspapers aren't losing as much money as a few years ago, thanks to a small uptick in reader payments from digital paywalls and higher circulation prices....


Revenue continued to fall at newspapers last year as modest increases in circulation revenue failed to offset bigger declines in advertising, according to the latest earnings reports from the nation’s large, publicly traded newspaper companies.


Analysts say the good news—if there is any—is that the revenue decline is not as steep as a few years ago, thanks to a small uptick in reader payments from digital paywalls and increased subscription prices.


“I wouldn’t call it a renaissance for newspapers, but I would definitely call it a stabilization,” said Gordon Borrell, a media analyst and CEO of Borrell Associates....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good analysis of newspaper trends and revenue.

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Six Steps to Take Before You Write An eBook

Six Steps to Take Before You Write An eBook | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Most writers simply begin writing the moment they come up with an ebook idea they feel is worth pursuing. However, it’s best to wait a moment…or a few moments…to focus and evaluate that idea. This helps your book have a chance of succeeding in the ever-more competitive ebook market. To give your book a good start, take the following six steps before you write an ebook...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Six practical tips and a starting point for authors and writers.

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IOANNIS APOSTOLOU's curator insight, January 19, 2014 3:36 AM

A little research has never been harmful!

Denise Gabbard's curator insight, January 19, 2014 1:52 PM

Writing an ebook can build credibility for you as an expert in your field--IF your ebook offers value to readers! These tips are great ones to take before you start writing! 

Marie Clement's curator insight, January 20, 2014 8:30 AM

eBooks are a great way to position yourself as an expert in particular areas.  They are by design quick, easy to distribute and fantastic to use as lead magnets for PPC or social media campaigns. This is a good artilce that takes you through the "is it a good idea" to getting it written.

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ToyotaVoice: How Print-On-Demand Is Transforming Self-Publishing

ToyotaVoice: How Print-On-Demand Is Transforming Self-Publishing | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Thanks to the advent of self-publishing, crowdfunding and e-commerce, indie artists of all kinds are launching their creative careers as solopreneurs...


...“When you make something easier to do, people do more of it,” wrote Thompson. “‘Print-on-demand’ publishing is about to do the same thing to books. It’ll keep them alive—by allowing them to be much weirder.


”By ‘weirder’ Thompson means more individualized and diverse. And he was correct. Bowker has reported increases in the numbers of book titles published overall for years, despite decreases in titles published by traditional publishers. The bibliographic information clearinghouse reported the growth has been ”driven almost exclusively by a strong self-publishing market.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Maybe ebooks aren't killing publishing after all? Weird huh? 

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, August 10, 2013 1:57 AM

Weird is beautiful. ...Profitability, well... Perhaps the beautiful worry less about such things.

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Why Media Companies Are Struggling (And How Inbound Can Help)

Why Media Companies Are Struggling (And How Inbound Can Help) | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

On top of the shifts in time spent with media and the fragmentation of audience engagement, media companies are also challenged with shifts in revenue. More traditional media companies like newspapers, radio, local TV stations, direct mail, and directories experienced a total decline in revenue ranging from $25 million to $1.7 billion from 2012 to 2013 according to Borrell Associates 2013 Local Advertising Outlook.


All of these factors are taking a big toll on media companies, forcing leaders at media companies to face their challenges head on. As I speak with more and more consultants, General Managers, VPs of Sales, and Directors of Marketing they tell me that if their companies don’t adapt to accommodate their audience and their advertisers, they’re going to fall behind. Here are the top challenges these media companies have shared with me, and how we believe inbound marketing can help them meet and defeat those obstacles....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Learn what the four biggest problems plaguing media companies are, and how inbound marketing can help address those issues.

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What You Can Learn From Profitable New Media Companies | 10,000 Words

What You Can Learn From Profitable New Media Companies | 10,000 Words | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

What You Can Learn From Profitable New Media Companies....

 

It ain’t easy being in the media business these days, or so they say. There are in fact lots of people allegedly, or actually, raking in digital dollars, according to this article from Fortune. They’re all content producers with a journalistic twist. They are all different in their own ways, but you can parse out some ingredients for financial success in the industry. Not surprisingly the top, profitable companies are: The Huffington Post, Gawker Media, The Awl, Business Insider, SAY Media, Vox Media, and BuzzFeed. So what sets them apart?...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

There are some valuable business lessons from these digital marketing success stories.

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Business Insider Just Told College Students Their Secrets of Success | MediaShift

Business Insider Just Told College Students Their Secrets of Success | MediaShift | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A bit more than four years after its launch (and six years after the launch of its smaller predecessor Silicon Alley Insider), BI has become one of the boldest business news sites in the world. Its coverage base has expanded from tech and Wall Street to areas such as politics, retail, advertising, sports, science, and military and defense. It boasts roughly 100 staffers and 25 million monthly unique visitors (though Compete.com pegs uniques at 3.8 million last October). Amid jabs at its editorial and aggregation practices, it is regularly held up as a digital news success story -- with hopes its profits will match its web hits in the years to come. As 24/7 Wall St. shared last summer, "Operators of traditional sites are left to wonder if they have to copy some of BI's editorial tactics and give up decades-old values or be trampled by BI as it scrambles to increase its audience and expand into new operations ... BI has given readers what few sites do -- almost no reason to go elsewhere to get information." During the recent Spring National College Media Convention staged by the College Media Association (CMA), Weisenthal and Carlson, two of BI's chief operators, shared advice with student attendees about web writing, audience building, social media mechanics, and a few old-school journalism fundamentals.... Below is a top 10 sampling of their tips and perspectives....
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My Amazon bestseller made me nothing | Salon

My Amazon bestseller made me nothing | Salon | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

My novel shot to the top of the site's bestseller list last summer. You won't believe how little I got paid...

 

This past summer, my novel, “Broken Piano for President,” shot to the top of the best-seller lists for a week. After Jack Daniel’s sent me a ridiculously polite cease and desist letter, the story went viral and was featured in places like Forbes, Time magazine and NPR’s Weekend Edition. The New Yorker wrote one whole, entire, punctuated-and-everything sentence about me! My book was the No. 6 bestselling title in America for a while, right behind all the different “50 Shades of Grey” and “Gone Girl.” It was selling more copies than “Hunger Games” and “Bossypants.”

 

So, I can sort of see why people thought I was going to start wearing monogrammed silk pajamas and smoking a pipe. But the truth is, there’s a reason most well-known writers still teach English. There’s a reason most authors drive dented cars. There’s a reason most writers have bad teeth. It’s not because we’ve chosen a life of poverty. It’s that poverty has chosen our profession. Even when there’s money in writing, there’s not much money....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

As an author, I can identify with this writing reality... but I'll do it again ;-)

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Meredith, the Publishing Company That Beat the Internet | Businessweek

Des Moines-based Meredith, best known for Better Homes and Gardens, has discovered the secret to keeping magazines profitable...

 

Meredith has profited from a few key strategies. They are experts at repurposing their content across multiple platforms (magazines, books, websites, mobile devices, tablets, etc.) and aggressively look beyond advertising and circulation for revenue. In print, they stay as far away from the news as possible. They are particularly successful at licensing their magazine titles’ names to major national businesses selling branded products; they also run their own marketing agency.

 

Meredith hasn’t been immune to the forces battering the industry. But over the past decade, by strategically tweaking their portfolio, they’ve managed to maintain steady profits and reliable margins year after year in spite of the turbulence. (Lacy declined to comment.)

 

In February, Meredith published one of its signature editorial products—a “bookazine” called Chicken Dinners. It was flush with ads, co-branded under the Better Homes and Gardens imprimatur, and sold with no expiration date. In theory, it could live on a newsstand—or a coffee table or a kitchen counter—for many months. “Chicken Dinners is Chicken Dinners whether you buy it in May, June, or July,” says Samir Husni, the director of the Magazine Innovation Center at the University of Mississippi. Some 88 years after Harold Ross launched The New Yorker with the pitch that it was “not edited for the old lady in Dubuque,” Iowa is turning into a surprising seat of power....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Interesting success story of an unlikely traditional and digital publishing powerhouse.

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Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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Update on Mark Staufer’s The Numinous Place – The Evolution of Storytelling

Update on Mark Staufer’s The Numinous Place – The Evolution of Storytelling | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Britta Reque-Dragicevic:  "‘The Numinous Place’ is the world’s first truly multidimensional work of fiction – technology and creativity merge harmoniously to create a uniquely experiential new medium" ...

 

[I enjoyed this look at Transmedia storytelling. It provided some valuable insight and reflections on innovation and technology in stories. ~ Jeff]


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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