Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Three lists about BuzzFeed’s serious journalism | Poynter.

Three lists about BuzzFeed’s serious journalism | Poynter. | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A little more than a year ago, BuzzFeed made the leap into the realm of serious journalism. It hired some known journalists and a lot more hungry young writers, expanded its verticals, and announced a plan to create serious content to go alongside the site’s trademark clever lists. Now, with BuzzFeed creating a home for its long reads, building a business vertical and trying to figure out how to expand into breaking and international news, it’s a good time to assess....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good look at what makes Buzzfeed click...

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OJR gets reboot: Social gets the boots | The PR Coach

OJR gets reboot: Social gets the boots | The PR Coach | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The Online Journalism Review(OJR) has always been a valuable resource for insight into the transition from traditional into digital journalism.

 

It’s ironic their website relaunch suffers some of the same challenges as traditional media moving to digital....

 

...I like the new look and several of the new features. What’s baffling is the lack of social media best practices for this “online” journalism review.

 

What’s missing?...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Fresh new look without social engagement and currency so far.

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What makes journalism ‘innovative’? Lessons from this year’s Scripps Howard Awards | Poynter

The 44 entries in the “Digital Innovation” category we were judging were some help. But not as much we had hoped. The top of the list, thankfully, exemplified the award criteria of finding “fresh, engaging” ways to do great journalism. What does that look like?

 

Think Snow Fall from The New York Times, which ended up winning the award. Big data projects from ProPublica, narrated graphics from the Los Angeles Times, the killer iPad app by Reuters, Bloomberg’s infographics, and News 21’s interactive video trailer presentation also had the judges uttering words like “stunning,” “mind-blowing,” “amazing” and “powerful.”

 

What set them apart from the rest of the entries was the way that each one found a creative — and effective — way to use a digital technique or tool to tell a story or convey information. Here’s a quick look at this judge’s favorites...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good read if you're interested in journalism and news...

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The State of Online Journalism Today: Controversial | Jane Friedman

The State of Online Journalism Today: Controversial | Jane Friedman | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A look inside the operations of a major online publication—The Atlantic—and the evolving standards of how content is assigned, sourced, and paid for.

 

The post consists of an e-mail exchange between Thayer and an Atlantic editor, where Thayer is asked if he would repurpose a previously published piece for the Atlantic’s website. He is not offered any money, but is told he will gain exposure since Atlantic’s site enjoys 13 million readers per month.

 

For those familiar with the online world of publication, this exchange is hardly surprising or unusual. If you scan the posts at Who Pays Writers, you’ll see that $0 or maybe $50–$100 is common for very well-known sites. In fact, the more traffic a website gets, the more it can avoid payment by offering the carrot of exposure—which is indeed valuable and needed for some writers, but not all.

Thayer, in response to the offer of pay through exposure, says:

 

"Frankly, I will refrain from being insulted and am perplexed how one can expect to try to retain quality professional services without compensating for them. Let me know if you have perhaps mispoken [sic]."...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

A good exploration of the issue of how much to pay freelancers.

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Living in social times: the Financial Times discusses social media strategy | The Drum

Living in social times: the Financial Times discusses social media strategy | The Drum | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Striking the right balance on social media channels can be difficult enough, but what if your brand is behind a pay wall? The Drum chats to the Financial Times’s social media manager Rebecca Heptinstall and communities editor Sarah Laitner about why the brand is still with the times as it celebrates its 125th year.Is there a certain platform you prefer working on?
Rebecca Heptinstall: Twitter is very much the Financial Times’s favoured social network in sheer community size (2.75m) and traffic to FT.com.

That’s not to say that other social networks aren’t important, they certainly are – for example, we were the first newspaper to reach 1m followers on Google+ in July 2012. We’re also figuring out what platforms fit with the brand as and when they pop up – for us it’s less about being everywhere and more about being represented well in a few places....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lots of learning and valuable social media insight from an old-school newspaper that gets social.

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BuzzFeed and the double source | Wannabe Hacks

BuzzFeed and the double source | Wannabe Hacks | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
BuzzFeed stir up a storm with a single, anonymous sourced story. Why?

 

...But as BuzzFeed has proved, one anonymous source does not merit a story, especially around a tricky topic. Basically, they published a story that challenged the accusations made by Michael Moore on Twitter that an Oscar nominated director was held at LAX for an hour and a half, with an anonymous LAX source challenging that, saying it was standard procedure and only lasted around 25 minutes.


The whole thing lead to a clash between Moore, Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald, a few other new sites and BuzzFeed. Apparently, the anonymous source allows for wrong-doing to be covered up.

 

This kind of reporting is becoming more common place though. In a world of digital first you never know when someone else might scoop your story. This means organisations run with what they have, as they have it....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Three words on this reporting: sloppy, lazy, unethical.

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Through the Looking Glass | Story Matters

Through the Looking Glass | Story Matters | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...For the past few years, we as an industry have been asking (often with great consternation): What is a digital magazine? All of the magazine titles I mentioned are answering this question differently. Some have created a news feed. Others, a video channel. Many repurpose their print articles into blog posts. The smart ones have created a searchable archive of past issues. A few just beg you to download their app.

 

When we ask the question that way, we open the floodgates to all sorts of slop that is decidedly un-magazine. The typical guru’s answer involves heavy-handed social media. And push notifications. And monetizing your online channel by paginating just below the fold, capitalizing on viral lift, and recalibrating expectations to include a mix of advertorial content and strategically placed calls-to-action powered by a new algorithm to maximize synergistic opportunities.


Gross....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Very thoughtful reflections on magazines, digital.

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Anita Dunn Says Fox News’ “Alternative Universe” Is Crumbling | AIM

Anita Dunn Says Fox News’ “Alternative Universe” Is Crumbling | AIM | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

On Wednesday, during an interview with HuffPo Live, former White House Communications Director Anita Dunn said that the departure of Dick Morris and Sarah Palin from Fox News signals that the network’s “alternative universe” is crumbling. Dunn created a controversy in 2009 when she told Time magazine that Fox News is “opinion journalism masquerading as news,” and followed that up on CNN by saying that the network “often operates as the research arm of the Republican Party.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good read for media hounds... grrrrr.

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Social media editors: Do you have a robot deputy? | Nieman Lab

Social media editors: Do you have a robot deputy? | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...As more people in any given newsroom are publishing to social platforms — andas more people bypass the homepage and instead use Twitter and Facebook as the entry point to any given news site — analytics companies see new opportunities to help media companies leverage real-time social data. 

 

Visual Revenue, a predictive analytics firm that focuses exclusively on media companies, is this morning rolling out a bundle of tools to help editors measure the effectiveness of social publishing in real time.

 

“So, if you push a story right now on Nieman Lab, 40 clicks into it you might see 17 retweets, two favorites, some manual retweets and that’s all great, actually,” Visual Revenue CEO Dennis Mortensen told me. “But how do you really add all of it up?”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Ch-ch-ch-changes. Very thoughtful look at what's ahead for newsrooms and social media...

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Traditional Media Trusted More Than Owned, Social Media For News Info

Traditional Media Trusted More Than Owned, Social Media For News Info | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Traditional media and online search engines are the most trusted general news information sources around the world, trusted by 58% of respondents to the “2013 Edelman Trust Barometer.” But trust is certainly not homogeneous, differing by age and country. For example, among 18-29-year-olds, search engines have the edge (61% vs. 59%), while traditional media gets the vote from the 65+ crowd (54% vs. 49%). Among all age groups, traditional media and online search engines are more trusted than hybrid media, social media, and owned media. Interestingly, younger respondents are generally more trusting of all media sources than their older counterparts....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Interesting media trust research...

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Reflections of a Newsosaur: Most newspaper stories are still too long

The news cognoscenti gasped when the Columbia Journalism Review recently reported that the nation’s leading newspapers aren’t writing as many long stories as they used to. But I think most stories are still way too windy. In a moment, I’ll tell you why, as briefly as I can. First the background:  Tallying yarns topping 2,000 words on Factiva, CJR found the number of long-form stories at the Los Angeles Times dropped by 86% between 2003 and 2012.  In the same period, stories of similar heft fell by 50% at the Washington Post, 35% at the Wall Street Journal and 25% at the New York Times. “When it comes to stories longer than 3,000 words, three papers showed even sharper declines,” said CJR. The number of super-sized stories dropped everywhere but the NYT, which actually had a 32% increase in articles of 3,000 words or more.  Remember the epic Snowfall?...
Jeff Domansky's insight:

This was a really thoughtful post about newspapers, issues and the future of news.

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Inside a serial narrative: A story is ‘a promise that the end is worth waiting for’ | Poynter

Inside a serial narrative: A story is ‘a promise that the end is worth waiting for’ | Poynter | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In April 2011, Kelley Benham gave birth four months early. Her daughter Juniper’s birth was supposed to be a joyous occasion. Instead, it was marked by physical and emotional pain, shock, and uncertainty about whether the micro preemie, who weighed just 1 pound 4 ounces, would survive.

 

Benham and her husband, journalist Tom French, were faced with a pivotal question: Fight for their daughter’s life or let her go? In a recent three-part series in Poynter’s Tampa Bay Times, Benham wrote about how she and French confronted this question and how the answer they sought has changed their lives.

 

“A story is a promise,” French said to her as they read to Juniper. “It’s a promise that the end is worth waiting for.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Inside look and a powerful and deeply personal series of stories by journalist Kelly Benham.

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Social media and the rolling news vacuum | The Media Blog

Social media and the rolling news vacuum | The Media Blog | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When a helicopter crashed in a densely populated part of London around 8am today, next to one of the busiest trainlines in Europe and a large bus station, the news was always going to be broken, within seconds, by members of the public on Twitter, armed with camera phones.


Twitter user Craig Jenner was one of the first to put a picture on Twitter which was shared far and wide.


What happened next is indicative of the way the media are increasingly playing catch-up on such stories, moving from reporting to aggregating (or curating, if you must) - images, eye-witness accounts and videos. Journalists were asking to use the picture with a credit and were trying to get Jenner on the phone...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is a really interesting story about a news story and how mainstream media were chasing  citizen journalists to get eyewitness accounts and reports. the Twitter feed provides a nice sense of reality. Lots of lessons for PR pros too.

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Professor Sanabria's curator insight, January 17, 2013 11:12 PM

Este es un artículo muy interesante sobre el rol del público en el quehacer noticioso. Agradezco a Jeff Domansky el haber añadido esta noticia a Scoop.it!

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Verifying Social Media Content: The Best Links, Case Studies and Discussion

Verifying Social Media Content: The Best Links, Case Studies and Discussion | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

... Since I began covering journalist arrests and press suppression in real-time via social media I have developed a healthy obsession with verification. As the tools we use to report online continue to shift, we need verification to keep up.

 

A great example of this is how Instagram filters or Vine jump-clips might hinder efforts to verify images and video from breaking news. Below is my directory of links and resources for verifying social media content – it is a work in progress. I have been collecting these links for awhile, but a recent study profiled over at Poynter inspired me to post my list here.

 

The study showed little consistency in how journalists approach assessing the accuracy of social media content. The links below are presented in no particular order, but are organized into three categories: How-To Guides, Case-Studies, Discussions and Studies. A note on scope: The resources below are specifically and purposefully limited to verifying social media and user generated content. General reporting accuracy is not covered in depth here....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Great reminder that verification matters and some resources PR and marketing can also use..

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Reporters say they’re ‘now being required to do entirely too much work for free’ | Poynter.

The recent dustup between Nate Thayer and The Atlantic concerning payment (or lack thereof) for freelance writers has highlighted a fact obvious to many working in newsrooms across all platforms: Writers, as a profession, don’t make very much, especially considering the volume of work they perform on any given project.

 

Charles Pierce said as much in a post for Esquire last week, chastising the Washington Post’s Ezra Klein for writing that much of the quality copy for news organizations is already being written for free by professionals who aren’t journalists, but rather “academics and business consultants and market analysts and former politicians.”

 

These sources, Klein argues, “have the expertise that makes editors — and readers — trust them.” This is a defensible position, Klein argues, because most journalists are simply repackaging their sources’ point of view, and the sources aren’t paid for their contributions. But as Pierce notes, there’s much more to being a writer than expressing a point of view for the Opinion section...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good read for PR and journalism pros...

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Matthew Keys’ legal defense in face of hacking indictment: He was an undercover journalist | The Next Web

Matthew Keys’ legal defense in face of hacking indictment: He was an undercover journalist | The Next Web | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When Reuters now-suspended deputy social media editor Matthew Keys was indicted over allegedly helping members of Anonymous deface the LA Times, using credentials that he provided, it was a surprise.

 

How Keys intends to defend himself is now in the open: His lawyers claim that he was an undercover journalist. As reported by the Huffington Post, his lawyer said the following: “This is sort of an undercover-type, investigative journalism thing, and I know undercover — I’m using that term loosely [...] This is a guy who went where he needed to go to get the story. He went into the sort of dark corners of the Internet. He’s being prosecuted for that, for going to get the story.”.--

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This story has more twists and turns than the Magic Mountain ride at Six Flags...

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Andrew Sullivan Says His Blog Made $611,000 in Less Than 2 Months | Mashable

Andrew Sullivan Says His Blog Made $611,000 in Less Than 2 Months | Mashable | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In the beginning of this year, Andrew Sullivan made the bold decision to part ways with The Daily Beast and turn his popular political blog The Daily Dish into a stand-alone business. As part of that move, Sullivan announced that the blog would forego ads and generate revenue through a metered paywall and an annual subscription fee for those who wished to pay.

 

Some questioned whether Sullivan would be able to make enough money from this model to support the business, which includes a team of writers and editors. On Monday, however, Sullivan revealed that he is already more than two-thirds of the way towards his goal for the year — after less than two months.

 

The Dish has brought in approximately $611,000 to date, the vast majority of which came before the paywall went up on Feb. 1 as many generous readers paid more than the $19.99 annual subscription fee to help Sullivan get the website on firm footing. In the three weeks that the paywall has been up, Sullivan says The Dish has brought in $93,000 in subscriptions thanks to the metered model. Sullivan's goal for the entire year was $900,000 in order to avoid pay cuts or other significant changes to the operation.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Will this paywall-funded blog be sustainable once the novelty wears off? Stay tuned.