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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach <a href="<a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a>" rel="nofollow"><a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a></a>
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Terror and the template of disaster journalism | Reuters

Terror and the template of disaster journalism | Reuters | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Natural disasters, airline crashes — and yes, terrorist bombs — undercut the normalcy of everyday life by bringing death’s whammy to an unexpected place at an unforeseen time. In the hours and days following such catastrophes, journalists work to restore normalcy to the panicked population by explaining how and why the bad thing happened and how to prevent it from happening again.

 

Reporters have been normalizing the abnormal for so long that they’ve created well-worn catastrophe templates to convey their stories. Yesterday, while covering the Boston Marathon bombing, journalists leaned hard again on those templates. First came the sputtering dispatches over radio and television about the calamity. Next up were the on-the-scene broadcast reports, frequently marred by confusion and contradiction, as the press held out hope for survivors but prepared audiences for the worst. Video of the catastrophe was converted by the cable news networks into a perpetual loop, giving the talking heads a wallpaper background to talk over (and giving new viewers just tuning in something graphic to watch)....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Wall-to-wall coverage, a constant video "loop" and the proliferation of cell phone photos and footage show just how significantly news coverage has changed. It's a sign of the times and a notable contrast from coverage of past events like 9-11..

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Facebook users get news from family & friends, Twitter users get news from journalists | Poynter

Facebook users get news from family & friends, Twitter users get news from journalists | Poynter | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Today’s annual report on the State of the News Media shows that new technologies really are pressing journalists to do much more with much less. Last week, we learned that newspaper industry ad revenue was down 7.3 percent this year to its lowest level since 1984 (or 1954, adjusted for inflation). As a result, newsrooms continue to shrink. But The Project For Excellence in Journalism’s report shows us that the needs and demands of the audience are growing and fragmenting. Social media is an important source of news, the report says, but remains smaller and only “supplemental” to other discovery methods like directly visiting a news website, searching the Web or browsing an aggregator....
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Twitter and news: The canary down the mine | Simon Ricketts

Twitter and news: The canary down the mine | Simon Ricketts | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

“Twitter does its best work in the first five minutes after a disaster, and its worst in the twelve hours after that.” - @rolldiggity

 

There is a quiet that descends in a newsroom when a big story breaks.... Twitter has often been touted as the “first with news”. From the miniscule to the massive. From Stephen Fry being stuck in a lift, to the Arab Spring rippling across North Africa, it is the instant source of a story, the first gurgle from a tap. The only way to find out what’s really happening, according to some.

 

But I’m beginning to think that so-called truth is losing some of its polish. I follow about 700 people on Twitter. I actually “watch” about three times that amount. I have lists of people I don’t follow. In other words, I can see them, without having to follow them. News people, experts, specialists, comedians, doctors, police officers, bloggers and bohemians. I’ve been on Twitter for more than three years. I like to think I’ve found much of the gold within its mines. When the first tweets about the Boston marathon explosions popped up in my timeline, I went over to my newsroom colleagues. I told them what was happening. And the process began. And I watched Twitter....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

As social media and traditional news intersect, interesting challenges arise for journalism.

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News is bad for you – and giving up reading it will make you happier | The Guardian

News is bad for you – and giving up reading it will make you happier | The Guardian | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

... News is irrelevant. Out of the approximately 10,000 news stories you have read in the last 12 months, name one that – because you consumed it – allowed you to make a better decision about a serious matter affecting your life, your career or your business.

 

The point is: the consumption of news is irrelevant to you. But people find it very difficult to recognise what's relevant. It's much easier to recognise what's new. The relevant versus the new is the fundamental battle of the current age. Media organisations want you to believe that news offers you some sort of a competitive advantage. Many fall for that. We get anxious when we're cut off from the flow of news. In reality, news consumption is a competitive disadvantage. The less news you consume, the bigger the advantage you have....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is a very provocative essay and an enjoyable read.

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Three lists about BuzzFeed’s serious journalism | Poynter.

Three lists about BuzzFeed’s serious journalism | Poynter. | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A little more than a year ago, BuzzFeed made the leap into the realm of serious journalism. It hired some known journalists and a lot more hungry young writers, expanded its verticals, and announced a plan to create serious content to go alongside the site’s trademark clever lists. Now, with BuzzFeed creating a home for its long reads, building a business vertical and trying to figure out how to expand into breaking and international news, it’s a good time to assess....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good look at what makes Buzzfeed click...

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OJR gets reboot: Social gets the boots | The PR Coach

OJR gets reboot: Social gets the boots | The PR Coach | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The Online Journalism Review(OJR) has always been a valuable resource for insight into the transition from traditional into digital journalism.

 

It’s ironic their website relaunch suffers some of the same challenges as traditional media moving to digital....

 

...I like the new look and several of the new features. What’s baffling is the lack of social media best practices for this “online” journalism review.

 

What’s missing?...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Fresh new look without social engagement and currency so far.

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What makes journalism ‘innovative’? Lessons from this year’s Scripps Howard Awards | Poynter

The 44 entries in the “Digital Innovation” category we were judging were some help. But not as much we had hoped. The top of the list, thankfully, exemplified the award criteria of finding “fresh, engaging” ways to do great journalism. What does that look like?

 

Think Snow Fall from The New York Times, which ended up winning the award. Big data projects from ProPublica, narrated graphics from the Los Angeles Times, the killer iPad app by Reuters, Bloomberg’s infographics, and News 21’s interactive video trailer presentation also had the judges uttering words like “stunning,” “mind-blowing,” “amazing” and “powerful.”

 

What set them apart from the rest of the entries was the way that each one found a creative — and effective — way to use a digital technique or tool to tell a story or convey information. Here’s a quick look at this judge’s favorites...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good read if you're interested in journalism and news...

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The State of Online Journalism Today: Controversial | Jane Friedman

The State of Online Journalism Today: Controversial | Jane Friedman | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A look inside the operations of a major online publication—The Atlantic—and the evolving standards of how content is assigned, sourced, and paid for.

 

The post consists of an e-mail exchange between Thayer and an Atlantic editor, where Thayer is asked if he would repurpose a previously published piece for the Atlantic’s website. He is not offered any money, but is told he will gain exposure since Atlantic’s site enjoys 13 million readers per month.

 

For those familiar with the online world of publication, this exchange is hardly surprising or unusual. If you scan the posts at Who Pays Writers, you’ll see that $0 or maybe $50–$100 is common for very well-known sites. In fact, the more traffic a website gets, the more it can avoid payment by offering the carrot of exposure—which is indeed valuable and needed for some writers, but not all.

Thayer, in response to the offer of pay through exposure, says:

 

"Frankly, I will refrain from being insulted and am perplexed how one can expect to try to retain quality professional services without compensating for them. Let me know if you have perhaps mispoken [sic]."...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

A good exploration of the issue of how much to pay freelancers.

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Living in social times: the Financial Times discusses social media strategy | The Drum

Living in social times: the Financial Times discusses social media strategy | The Drum | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Striking the right balance on social media channels can be difficult enough, but what if your brand is behind a pay wall? The Drum chats to the Financial Times’s social media manager Rebecca Heptinstall and communities editor Sarah Laitner about why the brand is still with the times as it celebrates its 125th year.Is there a certain platform you prefer working on?
Rebecca Heptinstall: Twitter is very much the Financial Times’s favoured social network in sheer community size (2.75m) and traffic to FT.com.

That’s not to say that other social networks aren’t important, they certainly are – for example, we were the first newspaper to reach 1m followers on Google+ in July 2012. We’re also figuring out what platforms fit with the brand as and when they pop up – for us it’s less about being everywhere and more about being represented well in a few places....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lots of learning and valuable social media insight from an old-school newspaper that gets social.

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BuzzFeed and the double source | Wannabe Hacks

BuzzFeed and the double source | Wannabe Hacks | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
BuzzFeed stir up a storm with a single, anonymous sourced story. Why?

 

...But as BuzzFeed has proved, one anonymous source does not merit a story, especially around a tricky topic. Basically, they published a story that challenged the accusations made by Michael Moore on Twitter that an Oscar nominated director was held at LAX for an hour and a half, with an anonymous LAX source challenging that, saying it was standard procedure and only lasted around 25 minutes.


The whole thing lead to a clash between Moore, Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald, a few other new sites and BuzzFeed. Apparently, the anonymous source allows for wrong-doing to be covered up.

 

This kind of reporting is becoming more common place though. In a world of digital first you never know when someone else might scoop your story. This means organisations run with what they have, as they have it....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Three words on this reporting: sloppy, lazy, unethical.

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Through the Looking Glass | Story Matters

Through the Looking Glass | Story Matters | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...For the past few years, we as an industry have been asking (often with great consternation): What is a digital magazine? All of the magazine titles I mentioned are answering this question differently. Some have created a news feed. Others, a video channel. Many repurpose their print articles into blog posts. The smart ones have created a searchable archive of past issues. A few just beg you to download their app.

 

When we ask the question that way, we open the floodgates to all sorts of slop that is decidedly un-magazine. The typical guru’s answer involves heavy-handed social media. And push notifications. And monetizing your online channel by paginating just below the fold, capitalizing on viral lift, and recalibrating expectations to include a mix of advertorial content and strategically placed calls-to-action powered by a new algorithm to maximize synergistic opportunities.


Gross....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Very thoughtful reflections on magazines, digital.

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Anita Dunn Says Fox News’ “Alternative Universe” Is Crumbling | AIM

Anita Dunn Says Fox News’ “Alternative Universe” Is Crumbling | AIM | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

On Wednesday, during an interview with HuffPo Live, former White House Communications Director Anita Dunn said that the departure of Dick Morris and Sarah Palin from Fox News signals that the network’s “alternative universe” is crumbling. Dunn created a controversy in 2009 when she told Time magazine that Fox News is “opinion journalism masquerading as news,” and followed that up on CNN by saying that the network “often operates as the research arm of the Republican Party.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good read for media hounds... grrrrr.

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Social media editors: Do you have a robot deputy? | Nieman Lab

Social media editors: Do you have a robot deputy? | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...As more people in any given newsroom are publishing to social platforms — andas more people bypass the homepage and instead use Twitter and Facebook as the entry point to any given news site — analytics companies see new opportunities to help media companies leverage real-time social data. 

 

Visual Revenue, a predictive analytics firm that focuses exclusively on media companies, is this morning rolling out a bundle of tools to help editors measure the effectiveness of social publishing in real time.

 

“So, if you push a story right now on Nieman Lab, 40 clicks into it you might see 17 retweets, two favorites, some manual retweets and that’s all great, actually,” Visual Revenue CEO Dennis Mortensen told me. “But how do you really add all of it up?”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Ch-ch-ch-changes. Very thoughtful look at what's ahead for newsrooms and social media...

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Boston explosions a reminder of how breaking news reporting is changing | Poynter.

Terrible events such as yesterday’s bombings at the Boston Marathon have always meant “all hands on deck” for news organizations, with staffers pulled off their regular beats to contribute. But the endpoint of the newsgathering and reporting is no longer a front-page package of stories explaining — the best one can — what happened, why it happened and what might be next. Now, there is no endpoint — events are reported in real time, with stories in constant motion, and the front page is a snapshot of an organization’s reporting at the moment when the presses needed to roll. Boston was a reminder of that, and a look at what’s changing in real-time journalism. Through Twitter and various live blogs, I found myself looking over my shoulder at the Boston Globe, the New York Times, Reuters and other news organizations, and was able to make some observations and draw some conclusions....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Compelling reading from Poynter on the evolution of media...

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What the Pulitzers Tell Us about Successful Storytelling Strategies | Sarah Skerik

What the Pulitzers Tell Us about Successful Storytelling Strategies | Sarah Skerik | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The Pulitzer Prizes for journalism were announced this week, and the winning stories represent a variety of different angles, techniques and tools that provide good ideas – and more than a little inspiration – for public relations and marketing communicators.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Great stories well told by talented journalists.

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Edvina Babic's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:25 AM

Personal Branding gaat voor een groot deel over het ontdekken van jouw unieke code, het schrijven van jouw verhaal en het delen ervan 'right time, right place'. Nog nooit tevoren hebben we beschikking gehad over zo veel mogelijkheden, tools en platformen voor het delen van ons verhaal. Dit artikel laat zien hoe krachtig de integratie van verschillende middelen, zoals beeld, video, design en tekst, bij kan dragen aan het overbrengen van de beleving. In Personal Branding dient de inhoud van je verhaal als leidraad voor het overbrengen van beleving op je publiek. 

 

Zie hier hoe JOHN BRANCH een verhaal tot leven brengt: 

http://www.nytimes.com/projects/2012/snow-fall/#/?part=tunnel-creek

 

Welke beleving wil jij op je publiek overbrengen?

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TV, Twitter coverage of Boston bombings | Denver Post

TV, Twitter coverage of Boston bombings | Denver Post | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

TV and social media coverage of Boston bombings was repetitive and speculative. The story will unfold in coming days....

 

The Steve Silva boston.com footage of the Boston marathon finish line explosion is the new World Trade Tower plane implosion is the new Zapruder tape. Another national horror leaves a scar. We know the drill: The moment of violent disruption, the sense of shock oddly mediated by the screen, replayed endlessly — now on every platform. The repeated images become mere images, first shocking then numbing. At some point, perhaps to distance ourselves from the pain, we focus on the conflicting reports of the smallest detail: how many seconds elapsed between the first explosion and the second? First we heard “a few.” Then a more definitive “13 seconds.” Then “between 10 and 20.”

 

Every network had a different count. At some point we started counting ourselves, timing the moments with every replay. Could’ve been 13, but the speed of sound is faster than the speed of video, isn’t it? We were told that cell service was disrupted so as not to set off additional bombs. That report was then retracted. We heard the JFK Library had a third bomb. That report later knocked down. A suspect was held at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Authorities later said not so. More unexploded bombs? Maybe, maybe not. Information moves faster than knowledge and still the finish-line explosion footage rolls....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Confusion in the midst of a crisis spilled over into news and social media coverage too.

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7 great reads: this year’s ASME finalists in feature/profile writing | Nieman Storyboard

7 great reads: this year’s ASME finalists in feature/profile writing | Nieman Storyboard | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Awards season continues with the announcement of the American Society of Magazine Editors’ finalists for the National Magazine Award. The organization this week honored 62 publications in 23 categories, with winners to be revealed in New York on May 2. The National Magazine Awards have long honored the best of narrative journalism, especially in the Feature Writing category. This year, ASME combined the features bracket with the Profile category. Here are short excerpts from each of the seven finalists in “Feature Writing Incorporating Profile Writing:”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

If you love journalism and superb storytelling, you won't want to miss these seven finalists from the ASME National Magazine Award. Must-reads all!

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Verifying Social Media Content: The Best Links, Case Studies and Discussion

Verifying Social Media Content: The Best Links, Case Studies and Discussion | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

... Since I began covering journalist arrests and press suppression in real-time via social media I have developed a healthy obsession with verification. As the tools we use to report online continue to shift, we need verification to keep up.

 

A great example of this is how Instagram filters or Vine jump-clips might hinder efforts to verify images and video from breaking news. Below is my directory of links and resources for verifying social media content – it is a work in progress. I have been collecting these links for awhile, but a recent study profiled over at Poynter inspired me to post my list here.

 

The study showed little consistency in how journalists approach assessing the accuracy of social media content. The links below are presented in no particular order, but are organized into three categories: How-To Guides, Case-Studies, Discussions and Studies. A note on scope: The resources below are specifically and purposefully limited to verifying social media and user generated content. General reporting accuracy is not covered in depth here....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Great reminder that verification matters and some resources PR and marketing can also use..

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Reporters say they’re ‘now being required to do entirely too much work for free’ | Poynter.

The recent dustup between Nate Thayer and The Atlantic concerning payment (or lack thereof) for freelance writers has highlighted a fact obvious to many working in newsrooms across all platforms: Writers, as a profession, don’t make very much, especially considering the volume of work they perform on any given project.

 

Charles Pierce said as much in a post for Esquire last week, chastising the Washington Post’s Ezra Klein for writing that much of the quality copy for news organizations is already being written for free by professionals who aren’t journalists, but rather “academics and business consultants and market analysts and former politicians.”

 

These sources, Klein argues, “have the expertise that makes editors — and readers — trust them.” This is a defensible position, Klein argues, because most journalists are simply repackaging their sources’ point of view, and the sources aren’t paid for their contributions. But as Pierce notes, there’s much more to being a writer than expressing a point of view for the Opinion section...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good read for PR and journalism pros...

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Matthew Keys’ legal defense in face of hacking indictment: He was an undercover journalist | The Next Web

Matthew Keys’ legal defense in face of hacking indictment: He was an undercover journalist | The Next Web | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When Reuters now-suspended deputy social media editor Matthew Keys was indicted over allegedly helping members of Anonymous deface the LA Times, using credentials that he provided, it was a surprise.

 

How Keys intends to defend himself is now in the open: His lawyers claim that he was an undercover journalist. As reported by the Huffington Post, his lawyer said the following: “This is sort of an undercover-type, investigative journalism thing, and I know undercover — I’m using that term loosely [...] This is a guy who went where he needed to go to get the story. He went into the sort of dark corners of the Internet. He’s being prosecuted for that, for going to get the story.”.--

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This story has more twists and turns than the Magic Mountain ride at Six Flags...

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Andrew Sullivan Says His Blog Made $611,000 in Less Than 2 Months | Mashable

Andrew Sullivan Says His Blog Made $611,000 in Less Than 2 Months | Mashable | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In the beginning of this year, Andrew Sullivan made the bold decision to part ways with The Daily Beast and turn his popular political blog The Daily Dish into a stand-alone business. As part of that move, Sullivan announced that the blog would forego ads and generate revenue through a metered paywall and an annual subscription fee for those who wished to pay.

 

Some questioned whether Sullivan would be able to make enough money from this model to support the business, which includes a team of writers and editors. On Monday, however, Sullivan revealed that he is already more than two-thirds of the way towards his goal for the year — after less than two months.

 

The Dish has brought in approximately $611,000 to date, the vast majority of which came before the paywall went up on Feb. 1 as many generous readers paid more than the $19.99 annual subscription fee to help Sullivan get the website on firm footing. In the three weeks that the paywall has been up, Sullivan says The Dish has brought in $93,000 in subscriptions thanks to the metered model. Sullivan's goal for the entire year was $900,000 in order to avoid pay cuts or other significant changes to the operation.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Will this paywall-funded blog be sustainable once the novelty wears off? Stay tuned.

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These Five Astonishing Headline Writing Secrets Will Make You Cry, Or At Least Click | Forbes

These Five Astonishing Headline Writing Secrets Will Make You Cry, Or At Least Click | Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
You'll never believe Peter Koechley's OUTRAGEOUS headline writing tips.
For most of us in the online journalism business, writing headlines basically amounts to guesswork. Will people click on this? Are there enough nouns in here for Google to find it? Does this line break look weird? Should I use a question mark? An exclamation point?
For Upworthy, it’s more akin to a science — and not one of those mushy sciences like anthropology or psychology, either. We’re talking straight-up particle physics.
For every article they publish, its writers come up with 25 headline options. They then A/B test the four most promising before settling on a winner. 

The result: In just 11 months, with a smallish staff and not much original content, Upworthy has built a sizable audience (8.7 million monthly unique visitors as of last November) for its socially progressive message, plus a Facebook following of more than 1 million fans....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Forget page view journalism. Learn how Upworthy applies science to the art of headline writing. Five headline tips that will have your content rocking and rolling.

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Traditional News Media Bring Traditional Values to Information Society | WAN-IFRA

Traditional News Media Bring Traditional Values to Information Society | WAN-IFRA | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When everyone has the ability to blog, tweet and publish, traditional media have a greater responsibility to provide ethical, credible journalism.

 

That was a message that emerged from the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) conference taking place this week at UNESCO headquarters in Paris.

In the context of the Summit’s discussions on ethics, the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) and the World Editors Forum (WEF) panel focused on the role of traditional media in the digital age.

In the digital environment, when the source of information is often unknown, it becomes more difficult to determine credibility. Is the source supporting a hidden point of view? Is the blogger offering to promote products for a fee? Does the ethical culture transfer to the online environment? The panelists explored how the tenets of traditional media - quality editorial, credibility and ethical reporting, and investigative journalism – translate in the new media landscape....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lofty ideals and the challenge of who will pay remains.

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Why LinkedIn is a Sleeping Giant of Publishing | Digiday

Why LinkedIn is a Sleeping Giant of Publishing | Digiday | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Let’s say you were to construct the ideal business publisher from scratch. It would have a strong tech platform that doesn’t slow down because of too many users or ads. It would foster direct connections. It would also have writers who were the most influential people in their industries. It would be digitally native. And it wouldn’t be overly reliant on ads.


Now look at LinkedIn. Back to the ideal business publisher. Now back to LinkedIn.

 

Over the last four months, LinkedIn, always living in the shadow of the sexier social platforms, has quietly built out a publishing platform. It is now a publisher in its own right, under former Fortune editor Dan Roth, with LinkedIn Today feeding aggregated articles from more than 1 million publications to LinkedIn’s 200 million users based on their preferences. It complemented that with an original publishing effort around “influencers,” recruiting a who’s who of business like Richard Branson, T. Boone Pickens and Ari Emanuel, and about 250 others....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Really great article on the emergence of LinkedIn as publisher. The lines keep blurring between traditional and native publishers

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Italian journalist gets Pope scoop because she knew Latin | The Raw Story

Italian journalist gets Pope scoop because she knew Latin | The Raw Story | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

An Italian journalist who beat the world’s media on Pope Benedict XVI’s decision to resign got the scoop on the utterly unexpected news thanks to her knowledge of Latin.

 

“Our Vatican expert Giovanna Chirri was listening to the pope’s speech,” the ANSA news agency’s head of information Luigi Contu told AFP.

“At one point, the pope stopped talking about the consistory. Chirri understood he was saying he was tired, that the pressure was too much, and that he was going to stop,” he said....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Nice story and great lesson...

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