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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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How A Sandy-Related PR Nightmare Cost Startup Uber $100,000 In A Day | Business Examiner

How A Sandy-Related PR Nightmare Cost Startup Uber $100,000 In A Day | Business Examiner | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Amid accusations of price gouging, startup Uber started swallowing costs.

 

Uber, a company that makes an app you can use to summon a livery cab, had to deal with an extremely messy situation in New York yesterday.


Now it's having to deal with obnoxious punditry....

To get the drivers to pick up Uber customers, Uber had to start paying them 2X their normal rate.


At first, Uber passed this rate increase onto its customers through a program it calls "surge pricing."


But then customers and reporters started complaining, saying that Uber was "price gouging" in the middle of a disaster....

 

[Big challenge, bad PR hits small startup ~ Jeff]

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Content Marketing for Small Business, Part 2 | Paul Chaney

This is the second in a series on content marketing for small business.

 

These days I’m doing a lot of reading about and research on the topic of content marketing. One discovery I’ve made is that more and more companies – both B2C and B2B – are creating niche topic content rich sites for use as a marketing channel.


Here is a short list...

 

[Useful business examples ~ Jeff]

 

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The Worst Social Media Fails of Hurricane Sandy | Atlantic Wire

The Worst Social Media Fails of Hurricane Sandy | Atlantic Wire | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
During a major crisis like Hurricane Sandy, it's best for PR reps to keep quiet if they represent a company selling something frivolous like V-neck T-shirts. Unfortunately, not everyone has that kind of good sense.

 

There's been a small treasure of social media fails since the storm hit last night. Most notably, American Apparel are taking serious criticism for sending out an advisory last night for a 26 hour storm sale special: 20 percent off in all states affected by Sandy. That means sales in Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Maryland.

 

But American Apparel isn't the only company taking criticism for capitalizing on Sandy in name of capitalism. The Gap, the chino-peddling bastion of innocence, got caught up in the storm and tweeted this...

 

[Let's be clear here. These are marketing muckups. PR usually comes in after to apologize and try to clean up the reputation mess!  ~ Jeff]

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AT&T Loses Case; News Release Held Under Paid Advertising Laws | Spin Sucks

AT&T Loses Case; News Release Held Under Paid Advertising Laws | Spin Sucks | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Chuck Yeager recently won a lawsuit against AT&T for using his name in a news release, without consent, to sell their MACH 1 and MACH 2 Command Centers.

 

How many of you have ever referred to something historical in a news release?

 

I know we have. It helps you tell a story about something that might otherwise be boring.

 

That’s what AT&T (then doing business as Cingular Wireless) did when they issued a news release about their MACH 1 and MACH 2 command centers that allow them to quickly respond to natural disasters so their customers aren’t without service for very long.

 

They mentioned how Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier and achieved MACH 1 in a news release that was distributed via PR Newswire. And the General sued them over the use of his name....

 

[An eye-opener and a stern reminder to PR pros and DIY news release writers ~ Jeff]

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When newsjacking is in poor form and can damage your brand | Web Ink Now

When newsjacking is in poor form and can damage your brand | Web Ink Now | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

According to early news reports (I'm writing this early in the morning after the storm hit), Hurricane Sandy has caused $20 billion in economic damage and at least 15 people have lost their lives. A million people have been under orders to evacuate their homes and 7 million people are without power.

 

This is not the sort of story to promote cosmetics and fashion, two ideas on the HubSpot post.

 

These sorts of frivolous newsjacking ideas give the concept of newsjacking (and marketers in general) a bad name because it is a blatant attempt to exploit a tragedy....

 

[This message bears repeating: A disaster or tragedy is not the time for marketing ~ Jeff]

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14 things that must be in your social media policy | PR Daily

14 things that must be in your social media policy | PR Daily | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Your company’s social media policy needn’t be packed with legalese. Use this cheat sheet to make it simple and straightforward.

 

[14 excellent social media tips for your social media policy ~ Jeff]

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Transmedia Writing | Geoff Livingstone

Transmedia Writing | Geoff Livingstone | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Geoff Livingston:  "Stories told across multi-platform media environments — or transmedia stories as they are commonly called on the edge — require more complex writing. A story unfolds across diverse media with readers/viewers opting in to each layer."

 

[Excellent look at the challenge of writing for Transmedia ~ Jeff]


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New Research Shows 70% of Social Media "Buzz" on Controversial Topics is Either Fake or Unengaged | The Measurement Standard

New Research Shows 70% of Social Media "Buzz" on Controversial Topics is Either Fake or Unengaged | The Measurement Standard | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Just-released research by KDPaine & Partners shows most social media comments or posts on controversial topics are from bots, paid posters, or the uninterested. Most of what you think you know about social media buzz is wrong -- because most...

 

of the conversation that you think is happening is not really there. Most posts on controversial topics are fake, or paid for, or they are from people who just aren't very interested.

 

The social media buzz that we're all so hyped on? A awful lot of it is not conversation at all, but a figment of unqualified data. (It is, of course, difficult to generalize from just one study, and these results may be specific to controversial topics.)

 

[Provocative report makes good reading for social media, PR and content pros ~ Jeff]

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Structure Your Presentation Like a Story | Harvard Business Review

Structure Your Presentation Like a Story | Harvard Business Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
To win people over, create tension between the status quo and a better way.

 

After studying hundreds of speeches, I've found that the most effective presenters use the same techniques as great storytellers: By reminding people of the status quo and then revealing the path to a better way, they set up a conflict that needs to be resolved.

 

That tension helps them persuade the audience to adopt a new mindset or behave differently — to move from what is to what could be. And by following Aristotle's three-part story structure (beginning, middle, end), they create a message that's easy to digest, remember, and retell....

 

[These are great tips for speaking or presentations ~ Jeff]


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Consumers Hungry for Brand Stories

Consumers Hungry for Brand Stories | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

An October 2012 survey by Edelman Berland and Adobe found that American consumers are looking for deeper brand engagement than banner ads and social media “like” buttons. 73% of the 1000 adults surveyed agreed with the statement, “Advertisements should tell a unique story, not just try to sell.”

 

Marketers are probably shaking their heads back and forth right now, thinking, “But we have been telling you stories all along!” Perhaps, but the beauty of story is in the eye of the beholder. Clearly, many customers are not feeling engaged and immersed in the brand stories they’re currently hearing. They’re hungry to connect with other users and share their experiences, whether positive or negative. Confident brands that can get comfortable with this loss of control are likely to move ahead, I believe....


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Jim Signorelli's comment, October 31, 2012 1:04 PM
thanks Gregg, great find!
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Tweeting fake news in a crisis -- illegal or just immoral?

Tweeting fake news in a crisis -- illegal or just immoral? | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A New York man who used Twitter to send fake news reports during Hurricane Sandy is one of the city's biggest jerks. But should he also face criminal charges?

 

 

[Unforgivable but a very interesting ethical question ~ Jeff]


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Reputation Management in an Era of Total Transparency | Business 2 Community

Reputation Management in an Era of Total Transparency | Business 2 Community | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
This year’s TrustBarometer from Edelman shows that trust in chief executives has plummeted: only four in ten people view CEOs as “credible...

 

spokespeople”. This finding underlines the enormous challenge that businesses face in achieving successful reputation management today.


The context in which leaders must communicate and manage reputation is very different to the one they faced five short years ago....

 

[A new leadership challenge ~ Jeff]

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Q: Can PR Pros Become brand journalists? A: No Q: Brand Champions? A: Maybe

Q: Can PR Pros Become brand journalists? A: No Q: Brand Champions? A: Maybe | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

I'm in Miami this week taking part in the Holmes Report's Global PR Summit and the topic of "Brand Journalism."

 

I know nothing about the subject but no one else does either because it's a made up term that is in the early stages of being defined. Nothing wrong in that, I do it all the time but I try to think of concepts that make sense and this one doesn't make any sense at all....

 

[Tom Forenski says "brand journalism" is NOT journalism. Is he right? ~ Jeff]

Marty Note
I see the need for rebranding. PR has imploded swept away by search engines and social networks. I can also understand a desire for an attachment to brands. Brands are perceived as the lasting core of marketing. I don't understand the concept of "brand journalists" since journalism is investigative and far ranging and sends shivers down the spines of most CEOs and CMOs I've worked with or for. 

Since brands are becoming more social, with much of this new work being done by brand advocates and supporters NOT people with a direct stake (employees in other words), I see a brand champion role that PR experts could help create and shape.

Perhaps the most important idea for our new PR brand marketers to understand is how much flux brands and branding are in. Take a look at this infographic about how brands are "socializing": http://www.scoop.it/t/curation-revolution/p/791811864/branding-is-changing-socializing-your-brand ;

 

Brands and companies are changing rapidly. Here are some important ways companies and brands are changing:

* Brands and companies are becoming publishers. 

* Brands and companies are becoming curators.

* Brands and companies are becoming entertainers (Meetups, Videos, etc..).

 

While "Brand Journalism" may seem dissonant to what brands were and are becoming, brand curator or brand champion is a much needed missing set of marketing skills. PR skills such as building relationships with thought leaders, organizing disparate information into engaging communication, promoting engagement and connecting companies and brands to their supporters wrap around this idea quickly and well. 

PR pros could become the brand sherpas of a new more open, engaged and social branding.  Brand journalists as a concept just sends shivers down the CEOs and CMOs I've worked with (lol).  


Via LPM Comunicação SA, Jeff Domansky, Martin (Marty) Smith
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Jeff Domansky's comment, October 30, 2012 11:13 PM
Liked your take Marty, but PR as "brand Sherpas"? LOL. We already too much heavy lifting.
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You Suck At PowerPoint! | Slideshare

It's not the software, it's you....

 

[Excellent suggestions to improve every presentation ~ Jeff]


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The Magic of the Snowy Owl | Daily Infographic

The Magic of the Snowy Owl | Daily Infographic | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
HOOT! That's owlspeak for BOO! In honor of this spooky Halloween I found a nifty little infographic on the Ghost Owl, better known as the Snowy Owl in the States (and Hedwig for those attending Hogwarts)

 

[Most of all, a great design! Jeff].

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8 Scary Truths About Social Media Crises | Melissa Agnes

8 Scary Truths About Social Media Crises | Melissa Agnes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Social media crises are a scary reality that leave us all vulnerable. Discover the 8 ultimate reasons why you need to protect and prepare your brand.

 

[Excellent advice for handling social media crises ~ Jeff]

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American Apparel Angers Twittersphere With 'Hurricane Sandy Sale' | Mashable

American Apparel Angers Twittersphere With 'Hurricane Sandy Sale' | Mashable | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
An American Apparel ad for a "Hurricane Sandy Sale" has sparked backlash from the Twittersphere.

 

The retailer sent out an email blast Monday night, offering 20% off to customers for the next 36 hours “in case you’re bored during the storm.”

 

[Stupid marketers strike again and get continued well-deserved bad PR ~ Jeff]

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Brands Will Become Media: Here’s How | Edelman

Brands Will Become Media: Here’s How | Edelman | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
If your company doesn't have the below model in place a year from now, you may regret it.

 

You’ve probably felt it for some time, but now the roadmap is becoming clear—companies must build their own media empires. And if they don’t, they risk missing a window of opportunity that provides myriad benefits, whether it’s telling their own stories or becoming more efficient with the media dollars they spend.

 

Trends in media consumption point to the convergence of savvy marketing tactics combined with a real-time newsroom approach for brands to be seen and heard in a collectively social, digital and mobile world....

 

[David Armano shares the Social-Creative Newsroom model ~ Jeff]

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Organizations struggle to reach employees during Sandy | PR Daily

Organizations struggle to reach employees during Sandy | PR Daily | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Companies, hospitals, and government agencies had to be creative to reach staff when Hurricane Sandy swept in.

 

When a hurricane hits, land lines are overloaded and cell phone service drops. Power blacks out, and employees could be stranded in a dark, unheated house with a fallen tree across the driveway.
Yet communicators must find ways to pull off what almost nobody else can do: communicate.

Hurricane Sandy, which slammed into the Eastern Seaboard on Monday, forced organizations to find ways to check in on employees and let them know changes in work schedules....

 

[An excellent post with valuable crisis PR and communication tips ~ Jeff]

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Email Marketing Is All About The First Hour So Timing Is Key [infographic]

Email Marketing Is All About The First Hour So Timing Is Key [infographic] | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

What time do your readers normally browse through their inboxes? When are they most likely to open and click? Do they read messages that are more than 12 hours old? GetResponse set out to answer these questions in our latest research on open-and-click times and came up with some interesting conclusions.
 

This involved analyzing 21 million messages sent from U.S. email accounts during the first quarter of 2012 to determine the top result for the following metrics:
 

Open time Click-through time Recipients’ top engagement time


The really important finding was that all email messages, no matter what time they were scheduled for, get most opens within the first hour from delivery (up to 23%).
 

This means that if a message is sent too early (or too late) to top engagement times, it will miss the chance of reaching its maximum results. It simply cannot wait in the inbox for too long. The research confirmed that the subscribers are most engaged with their inbox content during the working hours: Scanning emails is the first thing they do when they start work — 8-10 a.m. Then, their inbox activity goes down, with the lowest results around lunch, and goes up again shortly before leaving work — 3-4 p.m. An interesting thing is that the average click rate also increases around 8 p.m., which might mean that this is the time when recipients read through their messages with more attention.
 

As the research shows: to achieve best possible results, you should schedule delivery of your email taking into consideration the following:
 

Emails reach the best results within 1 hour after landing in the inbox. If your recipients are occupied with other activities, they won’t be able to engage while it’s still fresh, and your message will be crowded out by more recent messages To optimize the engagement rates for your message, you should schedule it to hit the inbox no later than 1 hour before the top open times, when its chances of getting noticed are the highest. If your emailing's go to worldwide lists, make sure you use solutions that optimize delivery times in different time zones

 

Source. http://bit.ly/Tr6aq8
 


Marty Note
Great note from maxOz here about email marketing metrics and best practices. When I was a Director of Ecommerce email marketing consistently provided the best margins at over 30% net net. This is why your inbox is about to be beyond full from now until about 12.20 :).  

 

[Lots of valuable e-mail insight and practical tips. ~ Jeff]


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What Is The Secret Sauce In Good Content? | Search Engine Land

What Is The Secret Sauce In Good Content? | Search Engine Land | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

"What is 'great content' exactly?"

 

"The question is not as simple as it sounds.

 

"Defining great content depends on your point of view. What does it consist of, how is it used, and how to measure its value, are just some of the perspectives to be considered..."

 

Rick DeJarnette, in-house SEO at MSN.com, gives a good account of what makes great content from an SEO's point of view. Easily readable by humans, easily readable by robots, well-structured, well-tagged pages, plenty of links to it...

 

But the mechanics don't make great content. They just make it easier to find.

 

It needs to be interesting, compelling, useful, of the moment. All the SEO's in the world won't make a dreary article into a great one.

 

So what is the secret of great content?

 

Now if I told you that, it wouldn't be a secret.

 

[Terrific tips... and secrets to better ROI on content ~ Jeff]

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Storytelling versus Story Selling - Galvanizing the Nation to tell its many stories

We always seem to begin at the wrong end. It’s our settler story, which holds us back. We seem to be trapped in a time warp unable to express where to from here, invariably more comfortable in the past. This is the land that for most of its history has dominated its inhabitants. Its backbone was high, strong and forbidding. Its rivers crashed through canyons and exploded in flood. And at its center, it was still a living thing. Great eruptions and their legacy of lakes, streams and uncertainty are with us even now....

 

[Great reminder of storytelling without selling for stronger engagement ~ Jeff]


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Hurricane Sandy and Twitter as a self-cleaning oven for news | GigaOm

Hurricane Sandy and Twitter as a self-cleaning oven for news | GigaOm | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Critics of social media like to focus on how much fake news gets circulated during events like Hurricane Sandy, but Twitter and other services are also quick to correct those kinds of reports, and have become part of an expanding ecosystem of real-time news.


By now, most people have gotten used to the idea that Twitter becomes a kind of real-time newswire during events like Hurricane Sandy: a never-ending stream of news reports and photos, thanks in part to services like Instagram, and for some people at least a crucial lifeline of information during power outages. Can you believe everything you read during such an event? Clearly not, since there were innumerable false reports and fake photos circulating on Monday night. But what’s interesting isn’t that there was fake news — it’s how quickly those fakes were exposed and debunked, not just by Twitter users themselves but by an emerging ecosystem of blogs and social networks working together....

 

[Thoughtful post on news and Twitter. ~ Jeff]


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5 Free Tools for More Powerful Pinterest Marketing | Entrepreneur

5 Free Tools for More Powerful Pinterest Marketing | Entrepreneur | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Pinterest, the third most popular social network in the U.S., offers marketers a number of opportunities to extend the reach of their business through engaging visuals and a platform designed to make sharing quality content simple.

 

But marketers have limited time, especially when new social networks seem to pop up all the time. The good news is that there are several tools that can help you use time more efficiently on Pinterest. And many don't cost a penny to use.

 

Here's a look at five free tools that can make your marketing efforts on Pinterest more effective...

 

[Five, count 'em, five effective Pinterest tools ~ Jeff]

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Is Your Nonprofit Guilty of Myopic Marketing? | Business 2 Community

Is Your Nonprofit Guilty of Myopic Marketing? | Business 2 Community | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Because everyone is familiar with the “concept” of marketing, it’s easy to arrive at an incomplete or inaccurate view of what it is, how to use it, when to use it and what it can do to help you grow.
Is your nonprofit guilty of myopic marketing?


If so, you’re missing opportunities to deepen relationships, increase giving and build your reputation because of it.


To help you pressure test your current definition of what marketing really is, I’d like to share with you what it is NOT....

 

[How to avoid the shallow shoals of nonprofit marketing ~ Jeff]

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