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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach <a href="<a href="<a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a>" rel="nofollow"><a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a></a>" rel="nofollow"><a href="<a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a>" rel="nofollow"><a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a></a></a>
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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RepMan: An accident waiting to happen

RepMan: An accident waiting to happen | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
It came as no surprise to this blogger that GM fired its controversial CMO Joel Ewanick after just two years behind the wheel. As I reported when Ewanick arrived in Detroit, the guy has pursued a scorched earth policy that...

 

And, so, having decided it had been sideswiped one time too many by this road rage of a marketing executive, GM fired Ewanick, saying “...he'd failed to meet the expectations the company has of an employee."

 

Now, there's an interesting non-statement. Usually, when a Fortune 500 company terminates a high-profile C-suite executive, the press release indicates he or she “...left to pursue other interests.” Failing to meet the expectations the company has of an employee tells me there may be more to this dismissal than meets the eye (or exhaust pipe, if you prefer)....

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Olympic Lessons for Emergency Managers Using Social Media

There are numerous things emergency managers can learn from the Olympics regarding the use of social media.

 

Like millions around the world, I am obsessed with the Olympics. For two short weeks every four years, the summer Olympics come around and regale us with the highest form of athleticism and sportsmanship. They also are interesting markers for cultural and societal shifts.

 

For example, the uses and implications of social media since 2008 (the last Olympic Summer games) has changed exponentially. Cell phones with cameras and internet access are nearly ubiquitious with people utilizing these devices to routinely seek out and share information about a particular event.


Unfortunately, as many on Twitter have noted over the last three days, this change was not fully embraced by Olympic planners. For example, during the first day of actual events, the Olympic broadcasters were struggling with GPS and other wireless technologies that were supposed to aid in the delivery of information during the event (like the distance between bike riders). However, this was not a traditional failure of technology, but rather they blamed the public's overuse of social media (particularly Twitter and text messages). Consequently, Olympic observers have been asked to limit their use of social media to "urgent updates"....

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Ultimate Ebook - 100 Content Marketing Examples | Content Marketing Institute

Ultimate Ebook - 100 Content Marketing Examples | Content Marketing Institute | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The Content Marketing Institute is the leading resource for content marketing strategy and "how-to" advice/research for the content marketing industry.

 

This free e-book is a terrific resource and a must-read for content producers, marketers, storytellers and PR pros. It features 100 excellent examples in quick to read format. Here's a sample to whet your appetite:

 

8 Nike Better World Microsite

 

Company: Nike
Originally featured in: Fab 15 Content Marketing Projects by Jeremy Victor

 

Description:
The Nike Better World microsite uses HTML5 to present content in a hip storyboard-style that amasses all the goodness of the brand and delivers it in an unusual, scrolling format. Best of all? The attention-grabbing “Better World” video is made from “100% recycled advertising.” How green is that?” Example: Visit the microsite

 

What is a Microsite?
A microsite concentrates on a narrow topic or issue, featuring rich content developed by the sponsoring brand itself. Correctly executed, the microsite creates a gathering place that positions the brand as a contributing member of the community. To see five more examples of microsites done well, check out the “How to Develop a Microsite” blog post by Joe Pulizzi.

 

You can get your free copy here for a simple email sign up:  http://bit.ly/H4cuv1

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Mobile Marketing's Advantage Over Online Marketing [INFOGRAPHIC]

Mobile Marketing's Advantage Over Online Marketing [INFOGRAPHIC] | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Ninety-eight percent of all SMS and MMS messages are opened by users, according to a new infographic by MOGREET. 

 

Social media isn’t the new kid on the block anymore. Instead, mobile marketing is taking over, and many have hope that it will prove more effective than Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and even email.

 

Ninety-eight percent of all SMS and MMS messages are opened by users, while a whopping 84 percent of newsfeed aren’t read, 71 percent of tweets go unnoticed, and 88 percent of emails aren’t opened, according to a new infographic by MOGREET.

 

In addition, the total number of mobile device users is higher: 234 million people have cell phones, while 161 million people total are on Facebook, Pinterest, and Google+ in the United States.

 

As Gene Sigalov of Content Marketing Institute points out, text message marketing is a form of active engagement — unlike social media sites, where people aren’t reached in a one-on-one fashion. The infographic calls it ”narrowcast.”...

 

[Mobile's marketing power and some data to back it up - JD]

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Insecure reporters need to stiffen their backbone | Washington Post

Insecure reporters need to stiffen their backbone | Washington Post | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Reporters wrong to share drafts with sources.

 

Should reporters allow their sources to alter a quote after it has been spoken, or even to review drafts of their stories before publication?

 

In the former, I say usually no. In the latter, I say “Hell, no.”

 

...After a reporting trip to Austin, de Vise shared two drafts of his article with UT officials prior to publication. They didn’t like the first version, saying that its tone and thrust were unfair to the university. Among the more embarrassing e-mails was one by de Vise that accompanied his second draft, saying, “I’d like to know of any phrases in the piece that you think are too harsh or over-hyped. . . . Everything here is negotiable.”

 

De Vise is a fair-minded, conscientious and thorough reporter. But he made a mistake.

 

He forgot that Post reporters write for readers, not for sources....

 

[Great conversation around sources, ethics and journalistic integrity which apply to business too - JD]

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SoundCloud expands its effort to become the YouTube of public radio and podcasts

SoundCloud expands its effort to become the YouTube of public radio and podcasts | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
On the web, audio has long been video's neglected little brother.

 

SoundCloud is arguably the biggest music-sharing community since MySpace, but now the company is eyeing a different kind of audio: the spoken word.

 

The website was founded five years ago by two sound guys who wanted to make it easier for musicians to share their work. After a series of smart moves — releasing robust public APIs, building partnerships with the likes of Facebook, Tumblr, WordPress — SoundCloud has attracted audience (20 million registered users, according to the company) and money (including a reported $50 million investment round in January). SoundCloud’s “freemium” model charges heavier users for extra storage capacity and deeper analytics.

 

Now, as part of its effort to “unmute the web,” SoundCloud is courting radio news professionals, podcasters, and indie storytellers. A year-old team of about a half-dozen people is focused on spoken-word content. The company just hired Jim Colgan, formerly a producer and digital experimenter for WNYC public radio, to manage partnerships with audio providers....

 

[Interesting effort to focus on top audio. It has powerful potential if not corrupted by commercialism - JD]

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Holding Up a Mirror to Journalism - The Media Equation | David Carr

Holding Up a Mirror to Journalism - The Media Equation | David Carr | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The hacking scandal in Britain has mostly been treated as a malady confined to an island, rather than a signature event in a rugged stretch for journalism worldwide.

 

Imagine this chain of events: a division of a large multinational company is accused of a pattern of corporate misconduct that includes surveillance, hacking into phones and bribery of law enforcement officials....

 

It sounds improbable, like a John Grisham legal thriller about a corrupt law firm or a fast-and-loose brokerage house, but it actually happened at a newspaper company, of all things. Last week seven former executives at News International, the British newspaper division of News Corporation, including Andy Coulson and Rebekah Brooks, were charged in connection with the phone hacking investigation, after years of denials.

 

If this happened in any other industry — the banking sector during the financial crisis, the oil companies after the BP spill, or Blackwater during the Iraq war — you would expect to see a full-court press by journalists seeking to shine a light on a corrupt culture allowed to run amok....

 

[David Carr reminds journalism that it should be judged by the same ethical standards of any business - JD]

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It's Hard Out There for a Plagiarist

It's Hard Out There for a Plagiarist | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Jonah Lehrer saw his career as a New Yorker writer end today for fabricating Bob Dylan quotes, but there is an interesting side note for this Internet age: the lifespan of a plagiarist appears to be getting shorter.

 

When the news came out that Jonah Lehrer had resigned from the The New Yorker over fabricating quotes from Bob Dylan in his recent book, Imagine, the journalism world went into a state of shock for a moment. Weren't we just dealing with Lehrer and plagiarism-related issues a month ago? The update: Sunday night, Lehrer confessed to Michael Moynihan, who'd three weeks ago found the Dylan quotes suspicious and confronted him about them, as Moynihan wrote at Tablet magazine. Lehrer followed his confession with a resignation, and today, statements from him and from New Yorker editor David Remnick, who defended his writer a month ago, also followed.

 

It's ultimately a sad story—making things up seems a pointless risk in journalism—but one with an interesting side plot for this Internet age. Is it possible that the lifespan of a plagiarist is getting shorter? While it's true that we don't know how far fabricating goes back with Lehrer (surely some journalists are on the case to find out if it extends beyond this and the cases in The New Yorker?), we do know that he was only at The New Yorker for two months, following his role at Wired. We also know that the murmurings about plagiarism started about a month ago. Recently, in another plagiarism case, a Wall Street Journal intern was caught fabricating quotes after just three weeks on the job....

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New Yorker Writer Resigns After Being Caught Fabricating Bob Dylan Quotes For New Book | Mediaite

New Yorker Writer Resigns After Being Caught Fabricating Bob Dylan Quotes For New Book | Mediaite | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
New Yorker staff writer Jonah Lehrer has officially resigned from his position after admitting to fabricating several quotes attributed to Bob Dylan in his latest non-fiction book, Imagine: How Creativity Works.

 

An article posted to Tablet Monday morning by Reason contributing editor Michael Moynihan exposed Lehrer’s quote fabrications and subsequent admission of guilt. In response, Lehrer released the following statement:

   Three weeks ago, I received an email from journalist Michael Moynihan asking about Bob Dylan quotes  in my book Imagine. The quotes in question either did not exist, were unintentional misquotations, or       represented improper combinations of previously existing quotes. But I told Mr. Moynihan that they were   from archival interview footage provided to me by Dylan’s representatives. This was a lie spoken in a       moment of panic. When Mr. Moynihan followed up, I continued to lie, and say things I should not have       said.
  The lies are over now. I understand the gravity of my position. I want to apologize to everyone I have let down, especially my editors and readers. I also owe a sincere apology to Mr. Moynihan. I will do my         best to correct the record and ensure that my misquotations and mistakes are fixed. I have resigned       my position as staff writer at The New Yorker....

 

[Predictable outcome for a serial plagiarist - JD]

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New Research on Why CEOs Should Use Social Media | Harvard Business Review

New Research on Why CEOs Should Use Social Media | Harvard Business Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
For CEOs who are trying to decide whether participating in social media is worth their time, there's new research that could help tip the balance.

 

For CEOs who are trying to decide whether participating in social media is worth their time, there's new research that could help tip the balance.

 

The new report from CEO.com and business intelligence firm DOMO
notes that social media is more pervasive than ever among consumers: 50% of the population currently uses Facebook, and more than 37% use Twitter. Yet among Fortune 500 CEOs, the report says, only 7.6% are present on Facebook, only 4% use Twitter, and less than 1% use Google Plus. LinkedIn is the only social network where CEOs are slightly ahead of the general populace, the study concludes: Twenty-six percent of CEOs surveyed use LinkedIn, compared to 20.15% of the population at large.

 

However, another recent report shows CEOs' reluctance may be changing: When IBM recently surveyed 1,709 CEOs, it found just 16% currently participating in social media. However the study predicts the percentage will likely grow to 57% within 5 years — and, in fact, social media will become one of the two most important forms of engagement with employees and customers, second only to face to face interactions.

 

Why the change? Corporate leaders — and especially large company CEOs — are finally realizing what their employees and customers already know: That using social technologies to engage with customers, suppliers, and even with their own employees enables their companies to be more adaptive and agile....

 

[Valuable research to convince the C-suite to jump in - JD]

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Conversation Agent: Doing Something Hard, Making Hard Choices

Conversation Agent: Doing Something Hard, Making Hard Choices | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
We're confronted with a myriad choices in business and in life. There is much discussion around making smart moves, picking one thing over another, optimizing the effective use of attention, time, and resources.

 

Challenging the mental models that drive those selections is considered too nuanced -- and just plain hard.

 

Yet, it is when we challenge the reality we have constructed around the recurring situations in our lives that we have breakthroughs.

 

Doing something hard, making hard choices...

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Terrible PR pitches: Why I write about terrible PR pitches

I've been a journalist for more than 16 years. So I've experienced my share of PR pitches. There have been, as much as I hate to admit it, some really good, useful PR pitches. These have come from PR professionals who understand news, know what makes a compelling story and who understand the company they represent and the products that company produces. They also understand what my paper does, who our audience is and where our market is.

 

Then there are the majority of PR professionals: like the woman who recently pitched me on a story on how interesting it was that their no-name startup had decied to locate in GASP! GET this! The same city where a bajillion other startups have located over the last 30 years! OMG! In other news from this firm: The sun will come up tomorrow! Can I set you up with an invterview with one of our experts to discuss this?

 

This woman is, unfortunately, not alone. I have to say, the large majority of PR pitches I receive are pretty bad. Terrible even....

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The Anatomy of a Killer Content Marketing Strategy | Mashable

The Anatomy of a Killer Content Marketing Strategy | Mashable | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Refinery29 has become a publishing force. Here's how this company makes people want to buy clothes.

 

Smart content marketers will tell you that brands need plenty of their own content published on their own sites. But that’s not the only option. One very effective new tactic is custom branded content campaigns that appear not on the brand’s site but on the sites of popular niche publishers.

 

At a recent talk, Chris Ahearn, the former president of Reuters Media, said that while the big publishers are still alive, they’re bleeding badly. Meanwhile “small” digital publications are doing brilliantly thanks to a stranglehold on a niche audience....

 

So what do these branded content campaigns look like and what can marketers learn from them? Here are a few of their best....

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Reputation, Not Image Management

Reputation, Not Image Management | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A new reputation study by Pam Cohen, a behavioral economist for Dix & Eaton, was recently released.

 

It appears that they are looking at various industries and chose the financial sectoras the first one. For this analysis, she drew on over two dozen data sources, government statistical information and industry rankings and surveys.

 

Of the nine drivers of reputation, the top five that impacted corporate reputation in this industry were shareholder investment (ROI), CSR, transparency, sustainability and image. Cohen remarked: “While it is no surprise that ROI shows up among the top drivers of financial institution reputation, more telling is that corporate social responsibility is the number-two driver, and sustainability number four.

 

This, of course, highlights our culture’s return to grass roots despite – or perhaps because of – the downturn in the economy. Values are viewed as being critical to organizational success and acceptance.” Cohen also mentions her surprise that “image” rose back into the top ranks of reputation drivers, a spot it has not held since a decade ago....

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How To Respond When Digital Social Activists Have You In Their Crosshairs | Fast Company

How To Respond When Digital Social Activists Have You In Their Crosshairs | Fast Company | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Three tactics for turning social-media fueled haters' antics against them.

 

Social activists are upgrading their approach to pressuring the companies they see as less than socially responsible. Take what’s happened to Shell this summer. As the global energy giant moves forward with plans to drill in the Arctic Ocean, Greenpeace, the Yes Men, and the Occupy movement have teamed up to take their efforts to another level....

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“Why’s this so good?” No. 52: Joshua Davis and the diamond heist

“Why’s this so good?” No. 52: Joshua Davis and the diamond heist | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
You could argue that a writer has no business critiquing the work of one of his closest friends. Knowing the person behind the words influences the reading experience, making it impossible to approach the writing with fresh eyes.

 

Yet proximity also offers advantages when it comes to thinking about craft.

 

Knowing Joshua Davis, I can tell you that one of the keys to his success with stories like “The Untold Story of the World’s Biggest Diamond Heist” is that the man thinks in scenes. This isn’t necessarily a prerequisite for good narrative nonfiction; certain writers can sculpt compelling stories out of nothing more than their cognitive firepower. But more often than not, writing is enhanced by scenes: those sequences of action that, when enriched with the right detail, enable readers to do more than merely digest information about what took place. It lets them feel as if they’re there.


To pull this off with events you never witnessed, thorough back-reporting is a must. It’s the writer’s ticket to material about prior action and dialogue – to resurrecting the past on the page so that you’re sharing a yarn, not delivering a bunch of facts....

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10 Big Business Blog FAQs | Technshare

10 Big Business Blog FAQs | Technshare | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
So you’re interested in starting a business blog. You should be!

 

Social media and blogs have become powerful marketing tools that can help improve customer service, build your company brand and drive traffic to your website, whether you are a plastic mold service company or Web design firm. Getting started is tough, though, especially if you don’t know where to begin – or if a blog is even a smart move for your business in the first place.

 

Here are 10 frequently asked questions about starting a business blog....

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Hactivists Spoof the New York Times, Mainstream Media Miss the Point

Hactivists Spoof the New York Times, Mainstream Media Miss the Point | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
It was the New York Times op-ed that wasn’t. After months of careful planning, Internet activists hailing from WikiLeaks, Anonymous and Yes Men quietly unfurled a very convincing New York Times web page on a lazy Sunday morning.

 

The article fooled everyone for several hours as readers shared it widely via social media, and then enjoyed a second life as media commentators caught on and fulminated over the injustice of it all. Lost in the media kerfuffle, however, was the prank's point - which counterintuitively supported the New York Times.

 

The bogus article, attributed to columnist and former New York Times executive editor Bill Keller, was published on July 29 under a URL similar to that of New York Times opinion articles and tweeted from a Twitter handle that looked nearly identical to Keller's. In 2010, Keller had helped the New York Times publish secret documents procured by WikiLeaks, but later he distanced himself from the organization's methods, drawing a sharp line between leaking and journalism. Titled "WikiLeaks, a Post Postscript," the fake article stated, "I find myself in the awkward position of having to defend WikiLeaks," and asserts the organization's First Amendment rights. Keller's fans were surprised by the turnaround and shared the article extensively.

 

At first, Keller himself appeared to accept the article as his own work. A link to the article appeared in his real Twitter stream, only to be deleted hours later. Keller called the shenanigans “childish” and “immature satire;” in short, he didn't find it funny. As word of the hoax spread, journalists made it clear that the stunt rubbed them the wrong way, going as far as to criticize the writing in the fake op-ed (some of which was cribbed from Keller's own work). “I wonder if WikiLeaks might be mounting a stealth campaign to keep copy editors employed,” Andrew Beaujon mused on Poynter....

 

[Fascinating look at journalism, ethics, freedom of speech and a quirky campaign by badvocates and hacktivists. Interestingly, journalists were not amused - JD]

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The Psychology of Storytelling: 10 Proven Ways to Create Better Stories (and Why Stories Sell) | Sparring Mind

Stories are a very integral part of being persuasive.

 

You’d think that as a guy that loves research and data, I’d be averse to storytelling as a whole.

 

As a marketer though, I can’t be: those in sales and marketing have known for a long time that stories trump data when it comes to persuasion because stories are easier to understand and relate to.

 

Are you incorporating stories into your copy? Are you utilizing them on your blog?

 

If you’re anxious to understand and tap into the power of storytelling, get ready to jot down some notes!...

 

[Greg Ciotti's post is a great read on art and science in storytelling - JD]

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5 ways to explain to your boss why Wikipedia matters | Social Fresh

5 ways to explain to your boss why Wikipedia matters | Social Fresh | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The biggest reason marketing and Wikipedia’s editorial community often find the relationship contentious is because companies haven’t invested the intellectual capital in meeting Wikipedia’s content needs.

 

...When marketing leaders establish priorities based on data, instead of buzz, they often find that Wikipedia is more important than they think.

 

But investing in doing Wikipedia properly means convincing your boss it’s important. So here’s five reasons Wikipedia is more important than… other stuff....

 

[David King raises a great point for PR strategists - JD]

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9 Pinterest Board Ideas for Content Marketers | Content Marketing Institute

9 Pinterest Board Ideas for Content Marketers | Content Marketing Institute | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Not on the Pinterest bandwagon? Try these 9 Pinterest board ideas for content marketers and start creating valuable content for customers.

 

As a content marketer, how do you make sure your time on Pinterest pays off, especially since your content might not be image driven? And what’s the best way to connect with others and form those relationships that are so critical to social media success? The answer lies in your Pinterest “boards” and “pins.”

 

On Pinterest, you set up boards around specific topics, and then add images or videos (also known as “pins”) to your boards. For example, you can create a board around specific vacation spots, cities you’ve visited, and even your favorite colors. Other Pinterest users can follow your boards, but the main difference between Pinterest and other social media networks is that on Pinterest users can choose to follow only one or a few of your boards or all of your boards. The goal is to provide relevant content so that other users follow ALL of your boards, not just a few of them.

 

As a content marketer, the best way to do this is to think about your customers and ideal clients and create boards around what they would be interested in. So while you may want to use Pinterest to share your best organic smoothie recipes or to gather ideas for decorating your baby’s room, try to stay away from creating boards that focus only what you are personally interested in.

 

Here are nine Pinterest board ideas for content marketers; ways they can create valuable content for their customers on Pinterest...

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Public Relations Disasters Are a Lot Like a Horror Movie | Shelly Palmer Digital Living

Public Relations Disasters Are a Lot Like a Horror Movie | Shelly Palmer Digital Living | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Whether you’re watching Freddy Krueger or an Alfred Hitchcock movie, there’s a typical 4-step approach that filmmakers take to scaring you half to death.

 

Now, let’s assume that you, your company or your client is involved in something that’s controversial, inappropriate, dangerous, stupid or even illegal.


The story quickly grows into a disaster when an allegation is made via social media, given credibility by newspapers and then mishandled.

Typically:
1. Most allegations could have been predicted, but weren’t.
2. The story (tension) builds while the accused tries to avoid the issue.
3. The story (tension) keeps building until the accused feels forced to make a poorly thought-through denial or weak apology.
4. The tension eases momentarily, while the “subject” believes they’ve skated past the potential disaster.
5. The story (tension) surprisingly explodes since the press is now looking for blood. (I couldn’t resist tying closely back to the horror movie premise.)


Understanding this sequence, you had better...

 

[Shelley Palmer shares solid crisis management tips - JD]

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The Future of Media is Currently in Production | Brian Solis

The Future of Media is Currently in Production | Brian Solis | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Broadcast journalism evolves with every new medium that emerges. Social media certainly opened the doors to new forms of content and distribution channels, but in the end, value, consistency and engagement separates those who find a long-term audience from those flail in obscurity. The market for relevant and compelling content is infinite, regardless of medium.


While traditional media learns to adapt, new visionaries arise to push the boundaries and possibilities of media and design fresh business models to support it. Such is true for my next guest on Revolution. Shira Lazar is not only a good friend, she’s also one of the practicing pioneers of new journalism....

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Doc Searls Weblog | The final demographic

Doc Searls Weblog | The final demographic | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

I started working in retailing, wholesaling, journalism and radio when I was 18-24. I studied Nielsen and Arbitron ratings for radio and TV when I was 25-34. The radio station I did most of that work for was an album rock station, one of the first. It’s a country station now, target demographic, 25-54. Other “desirable” demographics are 18-49 and 25-49. The demographic I entered between the last sentence and this one, 65+, is usually regarded by marketers as the edge beyond which no concern is worthwhile, unless you’re selling the cushy human equivalent of parking lots. Cruises. Golf. “Lifestyle” communities. Gack.

 

For individuals, demographics are absurd. None of us are an age, much less a range of them. We’re animals who live and work and have fun and do stuff. Eventually we croak, but if we stay healthy we acquire wisdom and experience, and find ourselves more valuable over time. Though we’re less employable as we climb the high end of the demographic ladder, it’s not because we can’t do the work. It’s mostly because we look old and our tolerance for bullshit is low. Even one’s own, sometimes....

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Colson Whitehead’s Rules for Writing

Colson Whitehead’s Rules for Writing | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Simple rules for becoming a better writer, from the author of “Zone One.”...

 

Colson Whitehead says the art of writing can be reduced to a few simple rules. He shares 11 rules to help you be a better writer....

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