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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach <a href="<a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a>" rel="nofollow"><a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a></a>
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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5 Elements of Powerful Stories

5 Elements of Powerful Stories | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Stories can create change, both in ourselves and in our organizations. In this guest post, Matt Ragland shares five elements of powerful stories.

 

[This was a great reminder of the most important elements in powerful stories. ~ Jeff]


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Gregg Morris's comment, November 17, 2012 10:05 AM
Matt really hit this one out of the park didn't he? I'm happy to read that you enjoyed it as much as I did Kathleen!
Kathleen Pooler's comment, November 17, 2012 10:13 AM
Yes, Gregg, he did! I have shared it all over and link in my blog post next week on building story structure for my memoir. His post was very well-timed for me.
Gregg Morris's comment, November 17, 2012 12:52 PM
Kathleen, have you read Charlotte Linde's Life Stories: The Creation of Coherence?
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The Future of The Visual Web and The Future of SEO [IMPORTANT article]

The Future of The Visual Web and The Future of SEO [IMPORTANT article] | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Level 343 Note
I’ve been doing a lot of thinking recently about the future of SEO. As I see Google moving into more and more areas and pushing organic below the fold, I wonder about the future of SEO. Check out this search, which has half of an organic result above the fold on my 15″ laptop monitor:

 

I see Google revoking data access by removing access to their AdWords API, and I see (not provided) climbing ever higher in every vertical in which Distilled has clients. I don’t see Google as being friendly to SEOs – Google is monetizing everything, and the only way they can monetize organic listings (even though that is what they built themselves on) is through ads, so they’ll increasingly be more aggressive with ads while also moving into other areas.

 

Marty Note
Added my comment to John's excellent article.  

 

[Totally agree that visuals are growing in importance for SEO. A good read.]


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Advice For A Twitter World: Demetri Martin On How To Be Succinct | Fast Company

Advice For A Twitter World: Demetri Martin On How To Be Succinct | Fast Company | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Demetri's Martin's philosophy translates to presentation development & delivery too! Size matters, for sure. Not every opus need be magnum, however, in order to make an outsize impact.

 

[Speaking? Keep it short, sweet. ~ Jeff]


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Is It Time For a New PR Approach To Sex Scandals? | Mr. Media Training

Is It Time For a New PR Approach To Sex Scandals? | Mr. Media Training | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Given that Americans are so used to seeing rather extraordinary sex scandals, are they less likely to be shocked by ordinary acts of marital infidelity?

 

...So all of that got me thinking: Given that Americans are so used to seeing rather extraordinary sex scandals on their televisions, are they less likely to be shocked by ordinary acts of marital infidelity?
And if so, does that mean that public figures who cheat in a rather ordinary manner can hang onto their offices and their reputations more easily?
I’m increasingly convinced that at some point soon, politicians caught cheating on their spouses will throw away the old PR playbook of holding a tearful press conference, admitting great sin, and pledging to be a better person. Instead, I suspect that otherwise-respected politicians will be able to turn to the camera during the heat of their crisis and say...

 

[Is there a new media training playbook coming for infidelity in the future?]

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15-Seconds Blog: 6 DO's & DON'Ts for Media Stake Outs

15-Seconds Blog: 6 DO's & DON'Ts for Media Stake Outs | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

There's much to learn from the Petraeus mess beyond the wisdom of having a homely man write your bio.

 

Among the other lessons: what to do and not do if you're in the center of a media storm and reporters stakeout your house. The Washington Post has a story today about the time-dishonored tradition of media camping out to capture a photo, some video, or perhaps a comment from someone at the heart of a big news story....

 

[Great media training advice.~ Jeff]

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The Media Business: Many journalists can't provide the value-added journalism that is needed today

The Media Business: Many journalists can't provide the value-added journalism that is needed today | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...Most journalists spend the majority of their time reporting what a mayor said in a prepared statement, writing stories about how parents can save money for university tuition, covering the release of the latest versions of popular electronic devices, or finding out if a sports figure’s injury will affect performance in the next match.

 

Most cover news in a fairly formulaic way, reformatting information released by others: the agenda for the next town council meeting, the half dozen most interesting items from the daily police reports, what performances will take place this weekend, and the quarterly financial results of a local employer. These standard stories are merely aggregations of information supplied by others.

 

At one time these standard stories served useful purposes because newspapers were the primary information hubs of the community. Today such routine information has little economic value because the original providers are now directly feeding that information to the interested public through their own websites, blogs, and Twitter feeds. Additionally, specialist topic digital operators are now aggregating and organizing that information for easy accessibility....

 

[The challenge for news media with the proliferation of social media and self publishing by everyone from city councils and corporations to citizens? Finding less available news and adding more value to it.]

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Condé Nast's Digital Push

Condé Nast's Digital Push | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The publishing company said it’s raising the circulations of both Wired and The New Yorker by 25,000 each on the strength of their tablet businesses.

 

...The more notable development here is that Condé said it’s raising the circulations of both Wired and The New Yorker by 25,000 each on the strength of their tablet businesses. Two years after both magazines created iPad replicas, the publisher is starting to see results at many of its titles, Sauerberg said.

 

“The numbers are really starting to scale,” he said, adding that by the end of the year, digital subscriptions will be well more than 1 million.

 

Like most major publishers, Condé Nast took a while to create a digital business. “Prerecession, we didn’t have to fool around with the digital business because of the rate of growth in the print business,” Townsend explained at the Paley Center. But then the recession shaved off 40 percent of the company’s revenue, and it was time to reorganize. Sauerberg was brought in to find new business besides print. “The postrecession moment is really the introduction of alternative platforms that take the pressure off print, not replace it,” Townsend said....

 

[Are PR and marketing their approach to the new reality of many screens? ~ Jeff ]

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Twitter takes new steps to be even more like Instagram |CNET

Twitter takes new steps to be even more like Instagram |CNET | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The microblogging service rolled out a series of new features today that together make it more instantly visual and take it even further past 140 characters. 

 

With a flurry of new features unveiled this afternoon, Twitter appears to be aiming more than ever at mimicking some of the most visual elements of Instagram and Facebook.


The most interesting new feature is one that adds a palette of "top" photos and videos to search results. So, for example, if you search for "sunrise," you see a group of photos above the resulting column of tweets, as well as a row of video thumbnails off to the side.


Clearly, the idea here is that Twitter wants users to see more information than ever before, and far more than just the 140 characters of actual tweets. It's an acknowledgement by Twitter that, more than ever, the richest communications are visual, something that netted Instagram a high nine-figure payday (its acquisition by Facebook) and helps make Facebook so attractive to so many people. While a 140-character tweet can contain a wealth of information -- a new thought, a URL, a retweet -- Twitter is nodding to the fact that when someone is searching for something specific, there's a lot of value in giving them an instant visual treat, even one that dominates the screen....

 

[Early tests of the Twitter search tool showed inconsistency ~ Jeff]

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Radio news is tops for teenagers | The Guardian

Radio news is tops for teenagers | The Guardian | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
But newspapers rank low in usage for 12-18 year olds...

 

The rather unsurprising, if somewhat depressing, result of a new survey shows that not too many British teenagers are reading newspapers.

 

More surprisingly, their preferred news provider is radio rather than online. According to a survey conducted by the youth writing website Movellas.com, 61% (of the 30,000 12-18 year olds it polled*) said radio was the best way to keep up with the news.

 

Given a multiple choice list of preferences, second place went to television news at 58% with the social networks Twitter and Facebook following at 56% and 52% respectively. Printed paid-for newspapers came in at 26% while free daily papers managed just 22%....

 

[Interesting to note the news preferences of each demographic.~ Jeff]

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The future of the feature: Breaking out of templates to build customized reading experiences | Nieman Lab

The future of the feature: Breaking out of templates to build customized reading experiences | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
In print, decades of design language have helped publications draw extra attention of readers. But news web design has mostly been straitjacketed in rigid templates. A few news sites are trying to break out.

 

When it comes to reading long form, the web can be an ugly, distracting place. It’s the reason why services like Instapaper and Pocket (née Read It Later) exist: to strip content of its context — noisy site designs, advertisements, and other unnecessary elements. But perhaps we’re moving into a new era where more of the web is clean and readable. Maybe the future of web publications will be beautiful enough that the reading experience is more enjoyable in its natural habitat.

 

This is how I felt, at least, when I came across ESPN.com’s “The Long Strange Trip of Dock Ellis,” a gorgeously designed feature about the Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher who threw a no-hitter while under the influence of LSD. It’s arguably one of baseball’s most colorful tales; this take on it is certainly one of the most ambitious web designs ever attempted by a traditional media company for a single article. The piece is generously adorned with accompanying visuals — photos of Ellis, memorabilia like trading cards, pull quotes, all moving and sliding while the reader scrolls. The reading experience is very comfortable on both desktop and tablet, thanks to a larger text size and generous amounts of white space. It’s feels like an experience instead of a block of words surrounded by the detritus of the web....

 

[This ESPN story is a fascinating design innovation for a news organization. ~ Jeff]

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About Infographics — Infographic Labs

About Infographics — Infographic Labs | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

What could be a better way to describe what infographics are than...

an infographic?

 

Really nicely done by the folks at Infographic Labs ~ Jeff

 

(Hat tip to Andy Bull for pointing this one out)

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Masterclass 53: Infographics for everyone | Multimedia Journalism

Masterclass 53: Infographics for everyone | Multimedia Journalism | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

You don't have to be a whizz at graphic design to create infographics anymore.

 

A number of free tools now let onyone turn dense information into an attractive, easily-read and absorbed visual story.


So this masterclass is about how to do that.

 

[Andy Bull's newest master class for multimedia journalism is on infographics. It's another in his great series and I'm working through his book and course now and it's terrific!]


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How Your Content Marketing Can Ignite a Movement | Content Marketing Institute

How Your Content Marketing Can Ignite a Movement | Content Marketing Institute | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Great content lies at the intersection of your company’s core values and the passions of your audience. Here's how your content marketing can ignite a movement.

 

If you haven’t seen Nirvan Mullick’s short (10-minute) film called “Caine’s Arcade,” watch it now. You’ll be glad you did — and the rest of this inaugural ContentVenn post is going to make a lot more sense. (If you have seen it, read on!)

 

The power of great content marketing
Caine’s Arcade is unbelievably powerful content. It is emotional, heart-warming, and inspired. Caine’s Arcade is so powerful, in fact, that it has spawned a movement. When Nirvan posted the video on April 9, 2012, viewers immediately began donating money towards a scholarship fund for Caine Monroy. Ten days after the release of the film, Caine’s scholarship fund hit the $170,000 mark. That’s powerful content. And it all could have ended there. But it hasn’t.

 

Creating a movement, creating content opportunities
Six months after Caine’s Arcade became a “viral success” it has become a real movement. It’s more than just a Vimeo success story. Today, that 10-minute film has spawned a full-fledged nonprofit with a real mission, real corporate underwriters, and tons more content. Go ahead, check out the Imagination Foundation, whose mission is to “find, foster, and fund creativity and entrepreneurship in kids.”

 

[Here's a powerful and inspiring story and how great storytelling and content can go viral. Lots to learn and potential ideas for nonprofits as well as corporations. Just jump in and enjoy! ~ Jeff]

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Darwin's Evolution Happening Now: Cisco's New "Listening Center"

Darwin's Evolution Happening Now: Cisco's New "Listening Center" | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Cisco, the leader in networking, is transforming how people connect and collaborate with social media.  Cisco has paved the way for employees, customers,...

 

Marty Note
My boss at Atlantic BT drew this idea on a napkin a year ago. What Jon Jordan's amazing entrepreneurial mind understood was the Network Operations Center we use to watch our servers has an even more lively and valuable application to social media marketing. By knowing what is being said NOW you can respond, make money and help shape the conversation. Being absent means you wield no influence and are subject to the tornado of sentiment and time, time and sentiment. 

 

[Listen up! More valuable reading. ~ Jeff]


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Gnowledge - Create, Share and Learn with a Global Repository of Tests

Gnowledge - Create, Share and Learn with a Global Repository of Tests | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Create tests and help others learn! Share tests with your students and peers to help them improve and accelerate their academic growth. Learn at your own pace by taking tests, quizzes and exercises at your convenience.

 

[Definitely a cool tool for PR, marketing and content producers ~ Jeff]


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RepMan: Hard-selling a soft-sell solution for Corporate America

RepMan: Hard-selling a soft-sell solution for Corporate America | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
I believe comedy is the next BIG thing for corporate and employee communications. Why? Because comedy is based on the two most fundamental criteria in any communications program: truth and authenticity.

 

Learn comedy's twin tenets and you'll become a better, more authentic storyteller. Period.

 

I once again experienced this phenomenon yesterday. Along with Peppercomm's Chief Comedy Officer (and professional comedian) Clayton Fletcher, I led a three-hour stand-up comedy workshop for executives of America's top pharmaceutical companies.

 

You might be thinking: What do comedy and marketing drugs for deadly diseases possibly have in common? Having trained lawyers, rocket scientists, oncologists and just about every other serious occupation one can imagine (except tinker, tailor, soldier and spy), I can report that each profession shares the same fundamental needs...

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Twinkie Party: The Loss of 18,000 Hostess Jobs Is a Big Joke to ABC News | NewsBusters.org

Twinkie Party: The Loss of 18,000 Hostess Jobs Is a Big Joke to ABC News | NewsBusters.org | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The cast of Good Morning America on Friday treated the bankruptcy of Hostess and the loss of 18,500 jobs as a hilarious joke. Josh Elliott, George Stephanopoulos and others guffawed as they handed out Twinkies and ate them on set. [See video below. MP3 audio here.]

 

This is the same program that repeatedly spun Republican Mitt Romney as out of touch with the average American.

 

News anchor Josh Elliott highlighted the report for his final update of the 8am hour, a segment usually saved for humorous stories about puppies or funny videos. After referring to the mass firing as "troubling," the crew handed out treats. Elliott joked, "You know, I'm just going to save mine for 12 years when it will still be good." Co-host George Stephanopoulos mused, "So this is, like, one of our final Twinkies." Amy Robach mocked, "A toast to Twinkies."

 

In contrast, both CBS This Morning and NBC's Today treated the story seriously and offered more coverage. Hostess is going out of business after failing to reach a deal with a bakers union....

 

[PR fail: Hey ABC News. Can you say insensitive and out of touch?]

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Coca-Cola enter the world of brand journalism | Wannabe Hacks

Coca-Cola enter the world of brand journalism | Wannabe Hacks | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola have made the transition to brand journalism, using its corporate site as a digital magazine...

 

Journalism is currently going through a transition. As this transition takes place, advertising revenue has dropped off, PR has gone up and ‘churnalism’ has become a worrying issue of newsrooms.

 

But why would corporations go through all the hassle of press releases or creating stories for their products when they could just do it themselves? After all, according to Harry Evans, news is “something someone somewhere doesn’t want you to hear”.

 

Three days ago, Coca-Cola took the first step into the world of brand journalism. It has completely overhauled its corporate site, rebranded and repackaged it as a digital magazine, Coca-Cola Journey. This will allow it to produce ‘news’ to its own agenda.

 

Ashley Brown, director of digital communications and social media at Coca-Cola, said: “Our corporate site is our most trafficked online property, so we wanted to create an experience that would make this incredibly valuable digital real estate work harder for us.

“We want to make sure that as our brand becomes a publisher, we do so in the most beautiful and functional way possible.”...

 

[Journalism? Meet brand journalism.]

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Freelance Unbound» Blog Archive What skills do journalism students need to get a job in PR? (Clue: social media) |

Freelance Unbound» Blog Archive What skills do journalism students need to get a job in PR? (Clue: social media) | | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
At a recent talk to journalism students at UCA in Farnham, Paul Marinko, media and public affairs manager at Surrey County Council, revealed the key skills...

 

required for journalism students who want to work in local government PR and public affairs. In short:

- Social media
- Video editing and package making*
- Content is king – you need storytelling skills
- Good writing – it’s amazing how many people in PR can’t write effectively


Crucially, you don’t just need technical ability in social media software and platforms – you need the communications judgement to know how to handle interaction on social media. Does something need an apology or a slap down? How important are the comments and commentators? How do you develop followers and engagement?...

 

[Seems practical, though research skills and some PR knowledge are critical ~ Jeff]

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NBC's Vivian Schiller: social media has made live TV essential again

NBC's Vivian Schiller: social media has made live TV essential again | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The war for the living room will ultimately be won not by gadget manufacturers, but by content companies — the people who make and distribute TV itself. But it’s a two-way street: the...

 

...internet is changing how even the largest producers of television think about their products.

 

Vivian Schiller has been on the front lines of change for years. She was the first general manager of what has become the Investigation Discovery channel, then the senior vice president of NYTimes.com, and then the CEO of NPR. Now she’s the Chief Digital Officer for NBC News, overseeing the company’s online efforts — including the newly-acquired MSNBC.com, which is now simply NBCnews.com.

 

We spoke about the future of distribution, how Twitter and Facebook are changing NBC’s audience, and the challenges of developing real-time news across different platforms and mediums....

 

[Good read on media trends- ~ Jeff]

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Gallup is very upset at Nate Silver | Salon

Gallup is very upset at Nate Silver | Salon | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The polling firm complains operations like FiveThirtyEight could spoil polling for everyone...

 

Did Gallup just blame Nate Silver for ruining the art and science of polling?

 

You don’t have to read too far between the lines of a statement from Gallup’s editor in chief, Frank Newport, published on Friday, to get that impression.

 

Newport first attempts the formidable task of defending Gallup’s polling accuracy during the 2012 campaign. Perhaps he was anticipating Silver’s Saturday column, which labeled Gallup the most inaccurate pollster of all the firms that measured voter sentiment this year. But Silver was hardly alone in wondering why Gallup regularly reported numbers much more favorable to Romney than anyone else in 2012. We deserve an explanation a little less lame than Newport’s: what’s the big fuss? Gallup wasn’t really off by that much....

 

[Suck it up Gallup and do a better job. ~ Jeff]

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The new propaganda: Armies take war to Twitter in Gaza conflict

The new propaganda: Armies take war to Twitter in Gaza conflict | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

As Israeli and Palestinian forces clash in Gaza this week, those same armies are engaging in a real-time battle of hashtags and twitpics, trying to win the hearts and minds of watchers around the globe.

 

Propaganda used to be about full-color posters and dropping leaflets from airplanes. Now, the Israel Defense Forces and the Hamas military Al Qassam Brigades are taking to Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Flickr, instantly sharing photos, videos and granular news bites in English, so that they can reach the broadest possible audience.

 

"What is happening here is that both Israel and Hamas are using social media to communicate over to the other side in the conflict and the broader international community," Charles Ries, former ambassador to Greece and vice president of the international division of the RAND Corporation, told NBC News....

 

[War for the words and minds on social media? ~ Jeff]

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The newsonomics of thin ice, from the BBC and FT to The New York Times and The Washington Post

The newsonomics of thin ice, from the BBC and FT to The New York Times and The Washington Post | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Some of the world's biggest news organizations, once rocks of stability, are showing signs of unstable foundations.

 

The cracks got a little louder this week.

 

For most of a decade, news companies have been operating on thinning ice. This week, events on both seaboards of the Atlantic displayed anew just how thin the foundations on which many major news operations operate are. With each crack comes a new sense of mortality and, thankfully, motivation.

 

Here’s a quick chart to demonstrate what’s at stake, just with the companies most lately in the news....

 

[Struggling for survival at BBC, Financial Times, New York Times and Washington Post ~ Jeff]

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Your LinkedIn Intervention: 5 Changes You Must Make - Forbes

Your LinkedIn Intervention: 5 Changes You Must Make - Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

I don't know you, but me I've longtime put aside LinkedIn, because I thought it's a boring and uninteresant business tool. But, today I know it's not the case. This excellent post explain in a perfect way what's going on LinkedIn, what everybody should know about the art of use it, and few other interesting things, a great post who's worth the time you would invest. [note Martin Gysler]

 

PS: I'll make the five changes right now, and you?

 

LinkedIn is, far and away, the most advantageous social networking tool available to job seekers and business professionals today. Far and away.

 

So why is it that so many of us stink at LinkedIn etiquette?

 

That’s right, folks. We stink at it.

 

We send out lazy, generic connection requests. We ask people we barely know for recommendations.

 

We ambush people, asking for favors before we’ve ever spent even two seconds of time building rapport. We shove our Tweets through our LinkedIn feeds, even though half the people on LinkedIn could care less about Twitter.

 

Read more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/dailymuse/2012/07/06/your-linkedin-intervention-5-changes-you-must-make/

 

[This is really sound LinkedIn advice. Make sure you follow it ASAP. ~ Jeff]


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6 tips for effective crises management | Janine Lloyd

Those who have handled crises situations before know very well that we can�t control every possible incident that may affect company reputation and share value. Often a crisis comes out of left field and usually the business is not ready for it.

 

[Practical crisis PR tips shared by Janine Lloyd ~ Jeff]


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