Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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“If we run and they kill us, so be it. But we have to run now.” | Matter

“If we run and they kill us, so be it. But we have to run now.” | Matter | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Six months ago, 276 Nigerian schoolgirls were kidnapped by Boko Haram. The handful who escaped that night have never told the full story of their ordeal — until now.Near the classrooms in the dusty schoolyard of the Chibok Government Secondary School, the Whuntaku girls hold court beneath the green lele mazza tree. There is no sign on the tree, no discernible markings; everyone just knows it’s their spot — where they gathered in the mornings, between classes, and after school to hang out, talk about boys, whatever....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls tell their story for the first time. This is a powerful story that must be read and remembered. 10/10

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Journalism startup Latterly doesn't care about page views one bit

Journalism startup Latterly doesn't care about page views one bit | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Next month, an earnest journalism startup called Latterly will embark on a bold experiment: whether it’s possible to run a business solely based on releasing high-quality nonfiction stories to the world.


Based in Bangkok, Thailand, Latterly will publish four new elaborate works of narrative journalism — with characters, plot, conflict, resolution, and all — on its website every month. The startup will charge readers $3 per month or $8 for a three-month subscription....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Journalism startup Laterally is an interesting experiment. Let's hope it survives.

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Nathan Bachynski's curator insight, October 15, 2014 11:31 AM

Complete opposite end of the spectrum from a normal startup. It's an interesting take on developing a new product and getting the word out there.

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This Site Wants To Debunk Internet Rumors Before They Can Even Start To Spread

This Site Wants To Debunk Internet Rumors Before They Can Even Start To Spread | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

You can't trust everything you read on the internet. But a real-time rumor-tracking site is trying to change that.


It's called Emergent. And it's the brainchild of journalist and fellow at Columbia University's Tow Center for Digital Media, Craig Silverman.  "It's aiming to be a real-time monitoring of claims that are emerging in the press," Silverman told The Atlantic.


Silverman and a research assistant gather rumors that are being reported, which usually first crop up on social media and are then picked up by various news outlets.


They enter those stories into a database, and the stories that need to be debunked are assigned a "truthiness rating," according to GigaOm. That way they can track which stories claim to be true, which ones debunk the story, and which ones are just re-reporting the original story. ...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Craig Silverman: "That’s ultimately the goal of this research: to identify ways to help the truth emerge faster, and spread father than before."

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Ideo Helps Develop New Designed-Minded Journalism Degree

Ideo Helps Develop New Designed-Minded Journalism Degree | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Journalism + Design, the latest program at the The New School in New York City is teaching journalists how to think like designers, and designers how to think like journalists. With a curriculum co-developed by Ideo, the undergraduate program kicked off this semester teaching students how to harness design and design thinking in news.

This interdisciplinary collaboration between Parsons, the New School’s design college, and the liberal-arts-focused Eugene Lang College, will be the first-ever undergrad journalism program at the New School. “The idea was to combine the rigorous critical thinking of a great liberal arts college with the creative design thinking of a great design school,” Program Director Heather Chaplin tells Co.Design. The experimental new program was funded in part by a $250,000 grant from the Knight Foundation, which funds innovation in journalism.

The program--which the creators refer to as being in beta--launched with six classes on topics like “Visualizing Data,” though for the time being, students can also take applicable classes, like web design, at Parsons or at Eugene Lang. In addition to regular faculty, guest editors and designers participate in classes, and each semester more informal “pop-up classes” will taught by working journalists like John Keefe, a data news editor at WNYC who’s teaching a class--in the style of a cooking show--on how to make maps....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is an important initiative in journalism where design is badly needed as a skill if news is to survive in the future.

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6 Places Journalists Can Find Free Online Training | The Freelancer

As fall approaches, students head back to school. And while busy freelance journalists may not have the time or money to enroll in a college course, there are a number of free online training alternatives right at their fingertips, offering lessons on everything from understanding financial statements to covering healthcare reform.


Here’s a look at six of the top options to consider....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Excellent list of free online journalism training resources is not just for journalists. PR, content marketing and social marketing pros will also benefit.

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Alaska news reporter Charlo Greene quits live on air to campaign for marijuana legislation

Alaska news reporter Charlo Greene quits live on air to campaign for marijuana legislation | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A news reporter in Alaska dramatically quit her job live on air so she could campaign for the legalisation of marijuana in the US state.


Charlo Greene, a reporter for Alaska-based news channel KTVA-TV, revealed herself to be the owner of the Alaska Cannabis Club, a "medical marijuana collective" that serves patients throughout Alaska.


Greene has reported on the club several times without ever revealing her connection to it. However, during one segment of the news programme, she revealed herself to be the president of the pro-marijuana legalisation group before adding "f**k it, I quit".


Following her shock resignation, the camera cuts to a visibly stunned main anchor, who stumbles over an apology before adding "we'll...we'll be right back"....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Well, some days are like that. Job up in smoke... and the poor anchor left dangling.

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The invasion of corporate news - FT.com

The invasion of corporate news - FT.com | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A population of 100,000 is no longer a guarantee that a city like Richmond, California can sustain a thriving daily paper. Readers have drifted from the tactile pleasures of print to the digital gratification of their smartphone screens, and advertising revenues have drifted with them. Titles that once served up debates from City Hall, news of school teams’ triumphs and classified ads for outgrown bikes have stopped the presses for good.


Last January, however, a site called the Richmond Standard launched, promising “a community-driven daily news source dedicated to shining a light on the positive things that are going on in the community”, and giving everyone from athletes to entrepreneurs the recognition they deserve. Since then, it has recorded the “quick-thinking teen” commended by California’s governor for saving a woman from overdosing; the “incredible strength” of the 5ft 6in high-school freshman who can bench-press “a whopping 295lbs”; and councilman Tom Butt’s warning about the costs of vacating a blighted public housing project.


The Richmond Standard is one of the more polished sites to emerge in the age of hyper-local digital news brands such as Patch and DNAinfo.com. That may be because it is run and funded by Chevron, the $240bn oil group which owns the Richmond refinery that in August 2012 caught fire, spewing plumes of black smoke over the city and sending more than 15,000 residents to hospital for medical help....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Are corporate interests winning at the expense of objective journalism and community interest? It's a sobering question and one worth debate and discussion.

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Antoine Peters's curator insight, September 21, 2014 5:30 AM

Life is changing as fast as the way we do business.

JOSE ANTONIO DIAZ DIAZ's curator insight, September 21, 2014 4:29 PM

agregar do visión ...

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Today's Faves: Apple Watch, "glance journalism" and the new "neutron of news"

...I misjudged -- I didn't think nearly radically enough. The quick-hit stream of Twitter or the Facebook News Feed is giving way to a largely agnostic, mostly opt-in "notification layer" on top of the phone screen.

And yet even that notification layer feels larded in the context of the single-most-interesting media-industry detail from yesterday's Apple presentation:

We are about to enter the era of "glance journalism."

"Glance" is the name of the feature of the Apple Watch that let Watch-wearers skim through a series of not-quite-notifications. Maybe they are notifications, but only as a subset of a new class of ultra-brief news.

"Atomic unit" was a helpful metaphor, but we're now talking about the "proton/neutron" level.

"Glance journalism" makes tweets look like longform, typical news notifications (and even innovative atomized news apps) look like endless scroll and Seward's list of essential Things (chart, gif, quote, stat) look unresponsive.

What a wonderfully evocative word: "glance." Apple's capital-G appropriation of it -- and the primordial display on the keynote screen -- is what set my mind spinning yesterday afternoon.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

"Glance journalism"! What a wonderful phrase from Dan Shanoff. If that doesn't capture the age, I don't know what does. Recommended reading. 9/10

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What Fox News can teach us about how the Internet works

What Fox News can teach us about how the Internet works | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The definition of "all the news that's fit to print" has changed on the Internet.


It’s not only Jon Stewart. Over time, it’s become abundantly clear  to  many that Fox News doesn’t always do the best with living up to the slogan “Fair and Balanced.”


But occasionally, Fox steps over the line from being blatantly partisan to just plain wrong. Such was the case recently, when they picked up a story from the Washington Free Beacon on an Indiana University program calledTruthy, and spread it all around their website and network.


According to Fox, Truthy was designed so the government can monitor hate speech and other suspicious patterns onsocial media. As the network’s Megyn Kelly put it, Truthy amounts to “some bureaucrat deciding whether you are being hateful or misinforming people.


”Except that in this case, it was Kelly who was doing the misinforming. Truthy has actually been around for three years, so it isn’t some new weapon the government is trying to implement without our knowledge. Moreover, the project’s goal is not surveillance, but examination....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lessons in bad news from Fox and the Internet.

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CNN's Don Lemon Laments "Media Spectacle" At Michael Brown's Funeral (While Broadcasting From Funeral) - Daily Surge

CNN's Don Lemon Laments "Media Spectacle" At Michael Brown's Funeral (While Broadcasting From Funeral) - Daily Surge | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

As Their Ratings Skyrocket, CNN's Don Lemon Laments: Michael Brown Funeral Should Be More than "Media Spectacle"


Today was Michael Brown’s funeral. #MikeBrownFuneral was a top trend on Twitter. Multiple media outlets live streamed the service. Al Sharpton eulogized. At least three Obama administration officials attended. The Nation of Islam covered crowd control. Countless celebrities and entertainers were in attendance, and t-shirts were sold.


One thing is clear: Trumped by the politics of self-interest and ratings-boosting media narratives, Michael Brown’s death stopped being about Michael Brown almost immediately after he was pronounced dead....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

"Don Lemon tweeted about taking a “break from twitter today in respect for parents & lives lost. Not choosing sides.” He tweeted that with a picture of him hugging Michael Brown’s motherHashtag: #FAIL ", writes Jerome Hudson. 


Loaded with bitter irony, this post is recommended reading for those who follow journalism.

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Turns out plenty of readers think that payola in news is just peachy

Turns out plenty of readers think that payola in news is just peachy | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...Imagine, though, if it turned out that serious news consumers didn’t care about that stuff. Not just teens or those who get all their news from Buzzfeed lists and trending hashtags — but if actual, grown up readers didn’t give a flying toss about church and state.


If that were the case there’d be nothing to stop every financially-challenged newsroom (i.e. every newsroom in the world) from joining the race to the bottom: Selling every headline to the highest bidder, giving every book a positive review (with an affiliate link at the bottom, of course, or even becoming a full-fledged ecommerce company. News organizations, after all, are supposed to serve their readers, and if readers want a completely bought-and-paid-for news agenda, how long will it be until they get their wish?


Judging by the depressing reaction to the Bezos-owned Washington Post’s move to insert giant Amazon affiliate buttons into its news stories, that future might not be far off....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Paul Carr wrestles with Amazon links on the Washington Post book reviews page online. Valid concern, but here's my response:

"Paul, I understand your concern about journalistic integrity. In the digital age are links any different than print ads for a bookstore on the reviews page of a newspaper or the banner ad for Braintree at the top of your post? If it's transparent to readers, it seems legitimate here and in the Washington Post."

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