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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach <a href="<a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a>" rel="nofollow"><a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a></a>
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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About Me social profiler tool | Creative Agency Secrets

About Me social profiler tool | Creative Agency Secrets | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Integrate your online profiles from social platforms into a single summary page using About Me.We’ve all got accounts on heaps of different social sites – here’s one that pulls together your wide range of accounts into a single page that is all “About Me“. Which is coincidently the name of the service. Tony Conrad – Founder of About Me Its service is a single page summary of your desired public profile, plus links to other places online where people can connect to you. Using a simple templated layout with strong graphics and use of imagery and customisable background colours, its easy to set up and create an unique, professional-looking page....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Don't forget About Me. It's a great way to coordinate and integrate your various social media profiles for easier search and presentation.

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8 of the Biggest Marketing Faux Pas of All Time

8 of the Biggest Marketing Faux Pas of All Time | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...What happens to those companies that make mistakes on a much greater scale and cost their company millions in clout or (gulp) dollars? They go down in history as the biggest marketing mistakes of our time. It's hard to move on when you're being cited as the example of what not to do, huh? We looked into the biggest mistakes from many popular brands -- but glossed over any smaller companies because we don't want to hurt the little guy ;-) Keep reading for a little entertainment, and some reminders of what you should never do to ensure you don't repeat these mistakes yourself....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Enjoy reading through some of the worst marketing mistakes big brands have made. Classic PR fails at that too...

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What You Need to Know About That Bloomberg News Snooping Scandal

What You Need to Know About That Bloomberg News Snooping Scandal | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Simon Dumenco deconstructs the culture of the global news conglomerate that billionaire Mike Bloomberg whimmed into being. Remember that time Bloomberg News got caught using subscriber information from Bloomberg data terminals to spy on the financial industry? Oh, right, that pretty much just happened. But conveniently for Bloomberg, a bigger journalism-related scandal -- the revelation that the Justice Department was spying on the Associated Press (a story that will haunt the Obama administration forever) -- broke, overshadowing the Bloomberg scandal.

 

You may have missed Bloomberg News Editor-in-Chief Matthew Winkler's admission and apology, titled "Holding Ourselves Accountable," that was published in the dead of the night last Monday -- at 12:11 a.m. ET. In it, he owned up to the fact that Bloomberg News reporters had access to "limited client information" for Bloomberg's financial-data-terminal business, a sibling division of the Bloomberg empire that serves more than 300,000 subscribers on Wall Street and beyond....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Accountability? Not so much.

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When a Successful Company Shrinks its Workforce | Harvard Business Review

When a Successful Company Shrinks its Workforce | Harvard Business Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

United Technologies is at the top of its game but recently announced big layoffs. Is this the new normal?...

 

... This growth was accomplished, however, without expanding its workforce much at all, and now UT believes it can continue to grow as it wants to while actually shrinking its employee base. It's planning to lay off 3000 workers this year, after shedding 4000 last year. Now, is this really anything new? After all, output has been going up and employment simultaneously going down in manufacturing around the world for several years now, and UTC is a big manufacturer.

 

But two things strike me as potentially novel here. First, the company does a lot more than just make things in factories. As its website says, "United Technologies... is a diversified company that provides a broad range of high-technology products and services to the global aerospace and building systems industries." Servicing elevators, security systems, and so on, in other words, is a big part of what UTC does, and services have historically been very labor-intensive. That could be changing....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

If this is a trend, it's both baffling and concerning. In addition to the need to rewrite the social contract, how can you communicate this situation without a reputation hit?

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Top Brands Face Dips In Favorability Scores | MediaPost

Top Brands Face Dips In Favorability Scores | MediaPost | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The Top 100 corporate brands experienced a general decline in 2012 favorability scores, according to CoreBrand, a brand consultancy and creator of the Corporate Branding Index.

 

The company, which provides benchmarking data, insights and corporate brand valuation for more than 1,000 companies across 54 industries, on Wednesday released its Sixth Annual Top 100 BrandPower Rankings Report, which ranks 100 corporate brands in terms of market reputation and awareness.

 

Favorability scores measure overall reputation, perception of management and investment potential. The decline indicates that in the current economic climate, consumers are evaluating corporate brands more harshly, and these brand criticisms are being amplified with the proliferation of social media and the 24-hour news cycles, says James R. Gregory, founder and CEO of CoreBrand.

“Now more than ever, it is important that companies improve the quality of their messages to the marketplace and focus on rebuilding trust, according to the company,” he says....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Interesting research study and trend. Can you spell antidisestablishmentarianism? ;-)

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:39 PM

Embrace Social Media Or DIP
This post reminds me of The Great Social Customer Service Race Study. We guest posted the Software Advice study, a Twitter based study where virtually every major brand (save one) FAILED to respond. 

Think this post about favorability being down and Software Advice's study results are related? I do to, the study is on Atlantic BT's blog:

http://www.atlanticbt.com/blog/social-service-how-social-media-is-changing-customer-service/  

 

Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, March 7, 2013 9:05 PM
No but I can spell DEAD if they don't wake up here soon. Sticking ones head in the sand only makes it hard to hear. This SMobile revolution is going to happen whether brands decide to lead, follow or get out of the way :).M
Jeff Domansky's comment, March 7, 2013 9:40 PM
Best line this week Marty: No but I can spell DEAD if they don't wake up here soon. Sticking ones head in the sand only makes it hard to hear.
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Klout Vs. Kred: Which, If Any, Is Better For Your Business? | Forbes

Klout Vs. Kred: Which, If Any, Is Better For Your Business? | Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

I’m often asked by companies who have hired us for Social media consulting “should we use something like Kred or Klout in our hiring process?” This question makes me cringe and my answer is always: absolutely not. But, and yes, there’s a but, you can use them to gain some insight as to what someone is about. It has always amazed me how quickly social media managers, HR managers and even CTO’s jump to adopt new measurement tools, analytics and data, just because someone comes out with it.

 

A brief look at a couple of the most well-known social media influence measurement tools and my opinion....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Influence or insouciance? 

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CEO’s Reputation Doesn’t Always Help | Institute for Public Relations

CEO’s Reputation Doesn’t Always Help | Institute for Public Relations | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
CEOs are often the face of a company, but having a visible, or even well liked, CEO may not help a company’s reputation in all situations.

 

This is a topic I explored over the summer with PRIME Research thanks to the Grunig PRIME Fellowship. Specifically, I looked at how the tone and visibility of CEO media coverage is related to the tone and visibility of overall organization coverage.

 

The first big takeaway is not all publicity is good publicity. Most public relations practitioners know this already, but if your CEO happens to be getting a ton of news coverage, it is probably a bad thing. CEOs often become visible during a crisis or because they say something particularly stupid. For example, Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary gained some visibility recently by saying “seatbelts don’t matter.” If he had said something reasonable like, “safety first,” media outlets probably wouldn’t have jumped on the story. Of course, these are just general relationships and there are exceptions to every rule.

 

The next takeaway is simply that there is a strong relationship between CEO media tone and overall company media tone. Public relations practitioners working for an organization where the CEO gains mostly negative media coverage would likely find it difficult to earn mostly positive coverage for the organization in general. The opposite is also true, if an organization is regularly bashed in the media, its CEO would likely struggle to maintain a positive reputation....

 

[Reputation research and reputation management dilemmas ~ Jeff]

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Meet The Billionaire Behind Red Bull's Death-Defying Corporate Culture | Forbes

Meet The Billionaire Behind Red Bull's Death-Defying Corporate Culture | Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The culture of risk-taking started early on for company, and is reflected in the personality of the billionaire behind Red Bull.

 

In one death-defying, record-shattering jump by Felix Baumgartner, Red Bull showed the world that corporate marketing can go well beyond normal, conservative advertising buys—in fact it can go to the stratosphere and beyond. But that culture of risk-taking started early on for company, and is reflected in the personality of the billionaire behind Red Bull.

 

You won’t be surprised to learn that Red Bull was founded by a former marketing executive. Austrian Dietrich Mateschitz graduated with a marketing degree from the University of Commerce in Vienna at age 28. Subsequently, he worked for Unilever and Germany’s Jacobs Coffeee, before becoming the international marketing director for Blendax, a German company (later bought by Procter & Gamble) that sold toothpaste, skin creams, and shampoo.

 

Mateschitz, who traveled around the world for his job, told Forbes’ Kerry Dolan in 2005 that it was on one of those trips to Thailand that he discovered a jet lag-cure in a type of syrupy tonic drink that was already successful across Asia. In 1984, Mateschitz quit his job and teamed up with Chaleo Yoovidhya, who owned a drink company in Thailand. Each invested $500,000 into the new business and took a 49% stake (plus 2% for Yoovidhya’s son Chalerm)....

 

[Interesting marketing profile in Forbes. ~ Jeff ]

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"People find it hard keeping up with their neighbours' lifestyles" says loans company

"People find it hard keeping up with their neighbours' lifestyles" says loans company | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Today’s generation is more obsessed with materialism and consumerism than ever before. This much, we know - it’s one of the truisms of our age, not least because of the unquestioning way the media parrots this very message on a regular basis. See, for example, the Daily Mail, July 23rd...

 

Of course, regular readers would have spotted that the ‘study’ was conducted by savviloans.co.uk - a personal loans company, who you might argue have a strong commercial incentive to emphasise the importance of keeping up with our neighbours, and buying things we can’t afford.

A quick google for ‘savviloans.co.uk press release’ finds us the source of the story - it really is that simple....

 

[Ah yes, churnalism. Arghhhhh - JD]

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Many Financial Services Firms Flunk PR, Survey Says | Institute for Public Relations

Many Financial Services Firms Flunk PR, Survey Says | Institute for Public Relations | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
While more than 77% financial industry communications professionals feel their company’s reputation will improve this year, many challenges remain, according to a survey of 150 communications executives at leading financial institutions.

 

Chief among the issues they face: negative public perception, which was cited by nearly eight in ten (78%). This is most likely the result of the lingering aftermath of the financial meltdown in 2008, which led to “The Great Recession.” This is borne out by the fact that nearly all of our respondents (96%) said that financial services companies invited negative public perception because of their actions or inactions.

 

I noted with interest that 74% of those we polled believe that increased regulations of the financial services industry will help their firms improve reputations and trust with customers faster....

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The Abominable Influencer

The Abominable Influencer | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...PR and marketing types alike dream of the influencer, the person who will trigger an online contagion (a.k.a. viral event). They desperately look for that powerful personality who will become their brand hero.

 

Finding the ultimate influencer eludes marketers in spite of modern theory. Regardless of measurable influence tools like Klout or the not so revolutionary definition of the influencer as someone who inspires action, today’s influencer theories and approaches still fail to identify the online bezerker....

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Looking behind the veil of Wikipedia, and who is pulling the levers | David E Henderson

Looking behind the veil of Wikipedia, and who is pulling the levers | David E Henderson | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

At the other end of the credibility scale from Encyclopedia Britannica is Wikipedia.org, which apparently has never had editors but rather administrators with enough latitude on their own for personal bias, anger, ignorance and lack of knowledge to influence decisions over what appears and what does not.

 

Worse yet, the administrators for Wikipedia.org have no journalistic or editorial training! But, they are the decision-makers for information that goes online that we – you and I – are supposed to assume is accurate. Are we being conned?...

 

[Cautionary post about trusting Wikipedia - JD]

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PR Dummies: How the Big Deals Get Done

PR Dummies: How the Big Deals Get Done | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Public relations encompasses a multitude of skills: audience analysis, persuasive communication, business savvy. There are those who do all of these things poorly.

 

These are the PR Dummies. The dumbest of the dumb, every week.

 

How do acquisitions for companies worth hundreds of millions of dollars get done? Generally not through unsolicited emails to the "tips" line of one of that company's media properties. Although you never know....

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Is Your Thought Leadership Strategy Using Research Wisely?

Is Your Thought Leadership Strategy Using Research Wisely? | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Is your thought leadership strategy using research wisely? It's not about proving your intelligence to customers, but rather about moving beyond "showing off" and actually providing something of value...


According to CMI, 57 percent of marketers feel publishing original research is an effective content tactic. But let’s be frank, much of what passes for “research” is just a small cut above a Survey Monkey experiment led by your summer intern (no offense to hard-working summer interns).


Tellabs happens to do original research well. Really well. And George Stenitzer, CMO of Tellabs, did not disappoint when we asked him to talk about Tellabs’ success using original, robust original research as part of its thought leadership strategy....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is an excellent post about building thought leadership. George Stenitzer's concept of thought-provoking content really resonates and should be the foundation for every thought leadership and curation strategy. Excellent read!

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13 issues management early warning tools to help protect reputation | Craig Pearce

13 issues management early warning tools to help protect reputation | Craig Pearce | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

There are many ways in which reputation-threatening and stakeholder relationship-threatening issues can be identified. Early identification and strategic action are key to dealing with issues successfully. So having tools in place which make it easy and intuitive for a public relations professional to identify issues are a boon for reputation protection and enhancement....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Craig Pearce has a list of 13 listening and monitoring tools to help you manage your reputation.

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PR Fail: Two Million Reasons Why Candy Does Not Make You Fat | Flack Me

PR Fail: Two Million Reasons Why Candy Does Not Make You Fat | Flack Me | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

... There's something more current, like the GOP hiring a PR strategist to educate America that it is not the "stupid party." Perhaps you remember the infamous case study of "Big Tobacco" hiring top-dog lobbyists to tell Congress that smoking doesn't kill people...stupid people jonesin' for a cigarette kill themselves.

 

And now there's this, brought to us by the National Confectioners' Association. This is the proud D.C.-based organization that is breaking open its big piggy bank to the tune of $2 million (put your pinky up to your mouth when you say that) to tell D.C. — wait for it — that candy doesn't make you fat. ...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Let the BS begin with this ill-conceived public affairs program. 

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The Fallacy of Social Media Transparency | Danny Brown

The Fallacy of Social Media Transparency | Danny Brown | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Social media and transparency are two words that often go hand in hand. But how true is social media transparency? ...

 

The thing is, this whole “transparency thing” in social media isn’t actually happening, because we’re essentially not allowing it to happen. There’s this unwritten rule in social media that it’s best to focus on what you can achieve versus calling out fakes and bad practices.

 

It’s the way the social web works best, folks say. And that may be true – but then that approach also dilutes the whole transparency argument too.

 

For example, there’s a very well-known blogger-turned-author in the U.S. that talks a lot about community and how humble he is to have one of the best. Yet the same blogger is quick to send nasty emails to people who don’t gush over his book(s)....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Straight talk on transparency from Danny Brown.

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Phantom Interview with Groupon CEO Andrew Mason on His Resignation Letter | Lou Hoffman

Phantom Interview with Groupon CEO Andrew Mason on His Resignation Letter | Lou Hoffman | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Andrew Mason’s resignation letter last week reflected the best of storytelling in business communications.

 

With this in mind, I tried to track down Mr. Mason to take us behind the curtain in how the letter came about.

 

Unfortunately, he proved elusive.

 

If Mason had agreed to an interview, I suspect the exchange would have gone something like this:...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lou Hoffman shares a very creative "what if" interview and story.

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All Apologies | PR Verdict

All Apologies | PR Verdict | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The two Australian DJs who made the prank call to Prince Edward hospital have broken their silence with an explanatory interview with Australian media.

Solemn and deeply apologetic, Michael Christian and Mel Greig, the two DJs behind the Kate Middleton-related hospital prank call that led to the suicide of the nurse who put them through, say they are “incredibly sorry” for what transpired. Speaking on behalf of the pair, Christian said both were “gutted, shattered, heartbroken.”

The fourteen-minute interview covered the predictable: Whose idea was it? Was this terrible outcome ever anticipated? What was their reaction on hearing about the suicide? And what happens now? At every turn, both gave a good interview. Prank calls have been around for years, they said, and they had no idea how this could happen. The call was meant to be nothing more than a funny routine prank. And, of course, they said they were very sorry....
Jeff Domansky's insight:

A forthright apology helps in a sad situation but this tragic case is not yet over for all involved. 

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Tom George's comment, December 11, 2012 4:59 PM
I didn't follow the story, but it sounds tragic. What did they say in the prank, if you don't mind me asking
Jeff Domansky's comment, December 11, 2012 7:10 PM
Prank call to hospital nurse where Princess Kate was for morning sickness. Nurse later committed suicide
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Big Risk, Big Reward: Felix Baumgartner and Red Bull Deserve All The Marketing Buzz They Get | Forbes

Big Risk, Big Reward: Felix Baumgartner and Red Bull Deserve All The Marketing Buzz They Get | Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Felix Baumgartner-and the Red Bull logo--in training. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife) Ask an ad guy: In this cynical, media-soaked age it's tough to get anyone's attention anymore. What it takes to really break through: authenticity.

 

...In the apex of the age of consumerism, we’re just drowning in pitches to buy.

 

Then comes today, with Red Bull. Yeah, as one friend just said to me, “I thought it was just some stunt,” — and it was. But what a stunt. Jumping from a balloon in near-space to fall more than 23 miles while breaking the sound barrier, risking his life, setting records, Heroic Stuff! The Right Stuff! And all brought to you by Red Bull.

 

In this new age of attempted authenticity (just act natural! CEOs Tweeting! People Like my new product!) they just absolutely killed it by being absolutely, totally, truly, over-the-top authentic. They backed a guy in an insanely risky, old-school kind of venture that was elegantly simple in its principles (go higher than anyone else, jump, live) yet so hair-raisingly sophisticated in its execution (pressure suit, capsule, hours of countdown, etc.) that it grabbed the world’s attention and kept a good part of it on pins and needles for a week, and talking about their brand. Why’d we watch, why’d we care? ‘Cause it was, in the words of Van Morrisson circa 1971, really, really, really, real (Lord have mercy).

 

You can’t tell immediately how many views this live stream of the jump on their site pulled in, but over on the YouTube live stream, at the peak of coverage, there were 8 million concurrent viewers from around the world watching. The walkup videos in the months ahead of today pulled in more than 5 million views, and got shared, of course, like crazy. Red Bull hasn’t said what all this cost, and it couldn’t have been cheap, but it certainly would be in line with a couple minute spots on the Super Bowl....

 

[Good insight into Red Bull's marketing grand slam ~ Jeff]

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What’s the Best Way to Measure Influence? DIY Not Klout!

What’s the Best Way to Measure Influence? DIY Not Klout! | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

I recently stumbled across the Infographic of Who’s Who of Social Influence Measurement and while it’s no surprise to see the social influencer industry growing, it’s a little worrisome....

 

No influencer app can ever accurately measure sentiment by running keywords through a program, because it can’t account for the different contexts of human conversations. Only a human being can do that. And heck, that can even be challenging for humans to determine when they are solely reading words and aren't able to see people’s facial expressions and body language as they speak.

 

But as organizations try and continue to justify the ROI of social media, there is a lot of pressure to produce lengthy reports to illustrate how they are preforming – thus the growth of influencer apps and products. My advice? Take influencer scores and reports by Klout, Kred, Twitalyzer, etc. with a grain of salt. If you are really engaged with your community, you will manually see how influential you are within your niche community....

 

[Good reminder that apps can't do it all -JD]

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RepMan: Consumers to brands: We are SO over you!

A new Corporate Executive Board survey of 7,000 consumers showed that less than one in five have a relationship with a brand.

 

According to CEB researchers, consumers reserve the word relationship for friends, family and colleagues (and, in my case, dogs). One typical response opined, “It's just a brand, not a member of my family.” Yes but, truth be told, I have a better relationship with BMW than with some members of my extended family.

 

To make matters worse, brands are exacerbating the dating and mating game by totally overwhelming us with their nonsensical messaging (aka advertising). CEB spokespeople say the survey's overarching message is this: stop bombarding consumers who DON'T want relationships “…through endless emails or complex loyalty programs.” Amen, brothers and sisters....

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Wrong to Focus on Reputation? Really? The Economist Thinks So | Arthur W. Page Society

The Economist, the global establishment’s weekly dose of instant insights, has fired one of its occasional dirty spoiler shots.

 

A few years ago, the magazine sent the whole CSR world into fits of righteous indignation when it said corporations should eschew any ambitions for social purpose beyond a focus on decent governance, good products and services, perhaps laced with a dose of philanthropy.

 

Now, with essentially the same argument, The Economist’s Schumpeter column

http://www.economist.com/node/21553033 says it is wrong for companies to aim at leveraging its reputation – or even to regard reputation as a corporate asset....

 

WRONG!

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America's Most Reputable Companies - Forbes

America's Most Reputable Companies - Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When you browse the aisles of your grocery store, fill up your tank at the gas station, or book a flight online, chances are, when you make a decision to choose one brand over another, you're influenced more by the company's reputation than by any particular product it offers.

 

...In the first quarter of 2012, Reputation Institute conducted an online study among 10,198 consumers. It measured consumers’ perceptions of those companies among the 150 largest in the U.S. that they were “somewhat” or “very” familiar with. Each company earned a “RepTrak Pulse” score of 0 to 100, representing an average measure of people’s feelings–or reputation–for a company. The scores were statistically derived from four emotional indicators: trust, esteem, admiration, and good feeling.

 

Reputation Institute then analyzed what it calls the seven dimensions of corporate reputation. That’s where it found that perceptions of the enterprise (workplace, governance, citizenship, financial performance and leadership) trumped product perceptions (products and services plus innovation) in driving behaviors....

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Has PR Become a ‘Lightning Rod of Mistrust’?

Does the public relations industry have a trust and reputation issue? Lord Bell, head of Bell Pottinger, thinks so, saying that PR has become a lightning rod of mistrust.

 

...Lord Bell sees “no solution to [the] issue,” of public relations’ reputation challenges, he tells The Holmes Report’s Arun Sudhaman, believing that “We [have] become the lightning rod for that mistrust. It is something we have to learn to live with. That makes us an easy target for the media.”

 

Lord Bell would know. As we have pointed out in this blog and in other forums, he and his firm have a way of attracting unwanted attention. Last March, PRSA wrote in The London Evening Standard that Lord Bell’s assertion that “everyone is entitled to representation so long as it does not involve doing anything illegal” should be placed in further context — that a public relations professional’s work also must not involve doing anything unethical....

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